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Arts: Art, Dance, Drama, Music

DANCE - PERFORMING ARTS

Introduction to the study of Dance as a Performing Art: technique, performance, composition and appreciation as an audience.

If you have ever wanted to learn how to dance, this is your opportunity! By the end of year 7, students will have the chance to learn various styles of dance including Hip Hop, Contemporary and Cultural Dance. Through practical workshops and theoretical lessons students will:

  • Apply the “Elements of Dance” and choreographic devices to create their own compositions in groups
  • Evaluate how different cultures from around the world and throughout time communicate and express themselves through Dance
  • Analyse Dance company performances to identify how technical and production elements create aesthetic appeal
  • Perform their own choreographed sequences and learn the technical and expressive skills appropriate to various dance styles

 

ASSESSMENT

Participation in workshops, group composition tasks, performance, process journal and written reports using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

 

Course
Semester Elective

DRAMA - PERFORMING ARTS

By the end of Year 7, students will have explored mime, voice, improvisation and movement in a practical learning environment. They will also be introduced to the technical side of theatre and gain a basic insight into stagecraft elements such as lighting, sound, costume and set design. Students will have the opportunity to apply this knowledge in drama to make and perform. They will also explore different cultures, times and places and communicate their understandings through drama. Students will collaborate with one another to devise, interpret and perform drama. Students will manipulate the elements of drama, narrative and structure to express and communicate meaning. They will apply different performance styles and conventions to convey status, relationships and intention. Performance skills and design elements will be applied to shape and focus theatrical effect for an audience.

ASSESSMENT

Workshops, mime, improvisation, performance, written reviews, reflective journals and written reports using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

 

Course
Semester Elective

MUSIC- PERFORMING ARTS

Music in Year 7 provides an opportunity to explore and play a variety of musical instruments through practical workshops and equips students with the fundamentals of music theory and history. A range of music technology is used as a part of the composition component of the course and students will enjoy the satisfaction of creating their own pieces. Students will also have the opportunity to rehearse and perform songs as a class and in small groups. This course caters for students of all ability levels and experience.

Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

ASSESSMENT

Participation in group composition tasks, performances, tests and written assignments using IBMYP criteria and aligned with the Australian curriculum.

Course
Semester Elective

VISUAL ARTS*

Students explore how Artists communicate through Visual Arts and Media Arts.

Knowing: the Elements of Art, artworks from different cultures/times/places, communication techniques.

Developing Skills: using a range of media- painting, drawing, mixed media, printing. Exploring techniques and processes.

Thinking Creatively: plan their art making in response to exploration of techniques, and creating meaning.

Reflecting: responding to artist’s works, and their own works.

ASSESSMENT

Finished art pieces, written and oral responses that demonstrate a student’s specialized vocabulary, IBMYP process journal.

 

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Design & Technology: Health & Home Economics

DESIGN: DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY*

Digital Technologies empowers students to shape change by influencing how contemporary and emerging information systems and practices are applied to meet current and future needs.

This subject is an integrated approach to teaching technology. The Digital Technologies Curriculum is introduced to students via the following:

· Block Coding using Web-based Learning Tools – lightbot.lu & code.org

· General-purpose Programming Language – Python

· Pseudo Code – Plain English planning using both Written & Graphical means

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the ‘Design Cycle’ approach to projects, design, make, evaluate using IB

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

DESIGN: HOME ECONOMICS*

The main two areas of study are:

Food: Students are introduced to issues related to safety and hygiene in the food area. Fundamental food preparation techniques are used during practical lessons to design, plan and produce quality healthy herb-garden based food.

Textiles:  Students will have the opportunity to use appropriate techniques and sewing machine equipment to create a textile item. They will learn compare and evaluate similar textile products, draw patterns, concepts and design as well as an appreciation of textiles and its uses.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment in each area is based on the Design Cycle using IB Criteria:

  • Inquiring and analysing
  • Developing Ideas
  • Creating the solution
  • Evaluating

Assessment Types include:

Assessment tasks, practical work and analysis of work completed.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

DESIGN: MATERIAL SOLUTIONS*

The course develops familiarity with a range of materials, tools, machines and processes as well as skills in design, problem solving, decision-making, researching and the application of information.

Students are given experience in working with various materials and systems (wood, metal, plastics, electrical circuits and Computer Aided Design). Students design and make projects as well as learning about tools, processes, materials and electricity. Working cooperatively and safely is emphasised.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed in the areas of the design cycle, practical skills and knowledge as well as environmental concerns and safety.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

English

ENGLISH*

In Year 7 English, students will read, view and analyse a range of texts eg Poetry, Prose, Drama, Visual, Short Pieces, Multimedia and Electronic texts

Listen to, evaluate and produce a range of spoken texts, eg Anecdotes, Debates, Multimedia Presentations, Poetry Performances, Formal Speeches and Social Issue Reports

Compose a range of texts – written and multimedia for particular audiences, purposes and contexts.

The nature of the texts students study and produce will begin as a transition from primary style texts and gradually increase in complexity to prepare students for year 8 texts. There will always be an emphasis on exploring issues relevant to adolescents and an approach that allows students to engage with aspects of our society including its diverse cultural aspects. At each year level, students will develop skills in understanding the language of different texts and acquire strategies to help them compose their own texts.

Study will also include a reading program aimed at increasing student literacy and reading proficiency. This will be supported by programs such as Tactical Teaching Reading and Literacy Pro.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will:

  • Listen to spoken texts, examine spoken texts and produce spoken texts
  • Read and view texts
  • Compose written and multimedia texts
  • Engage in associated language activities

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Individuals and Societies

INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES*

Individuals and Societies is a Humanities subject that combines History, Geography, Civics and Citizenship and Economics and Business.

In Year 7 Students will engage in the following topics:

History: Students will history from the time of the earliest human communities to the end of the ancient period, approximately 60 000 BC (BCE) – c.650 AD (CE). They will explore the ways we investigate the ancient past, Ancient Egypt, Ancient China and Ancient Aboriginal Culture.

Geography: The course adopts an inquiry-based approach to the importance of Water and the place it has in our world as well as the concepts of Place and Liveability. A strong emphasis will be placed on global thinking but local action.

Civics and Citizenship: This course will explore how the diversity of Australia, the role of the constitution and the ways that we safeguard the rights and responsibilities of our people. A strong focus will be placed on action and active engagement in being a community.

Economics and Business: This unit will have students explore the concept and value of work, how we can be entrepreneurs and the relationship between customer and producers. A strong focus will be put on practical application of these concepts.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will complete Source and Data Analyses, Investigative reports, Immersive Assignments, Imaginative and Analytical Essays, Visual and Oral Presentations.

 
Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Indonesian

LANGUAGE ACQUISITION*

“You can never understand one language until you understand at least two.” – Geoffrey Willans (Author and Journalist)

Anyone can learn another language!  This course aims to give students a chance to have fun using Indonesian to communicate on topics relevant to them.  We open their eyes to the possibility of being bi-lingual or even multilingual, depending on languages they already know. Previous knowledge of Indonesian is valued but certainly not essential.

Through developing their ability to speak, listen, read, and write in Indonesian, students will grow in confidence and skill.  As a bonus, they will strengthen their understanding of English and gain insights into how English works.

Students will experience Indonesia’s culture through a variety of interesting cultural experiences.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the IBMYP Criteria in the following areas:

  • Comprehending spoken and visual text
  • Comprehending written and visual text
  • Communicating in response to spoken, written and visual text
  • Using language in spoken and written form

 

indo 2

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Mathematics

MATHEMATICS*

In Year 7 Mathematics, students solve problems involving the comparison, addition and subtraction of integers. They make the connections between whole numbers and index notation and the relationship between perfect squares and square roots. They solve problems involving percentages and all four operations with fractions and decimals. They compare the cost of items to make financial decisions. Students represent numbers using variables. They connect the laws and properties for numbers to algebra. They interpret simple linear representations and model authentic information. Students describe different views of three-dimensional objects. They represent transformations in the Cartesian plane. They solve simple numerical problems involving angles formed by a transversal crossing two lines. Students identify issues involving the collection of continuous data. They describe the relationship between the median and mean in data displays.

Students use fractions, decimals and percentages, and their equivalences. They express one quantity as a fraction or percentage of another. Students solve simple linear equations and evaluate algebraic expressions after numerical substitution. They assign ordered pairs to given points on the Cartesian plane. Students use formulas for the area and perimeter of rectangles and calculate volumes of rectangular prisms. Students classify triangles and quadrilaterals. They name the types of angles formed by a transversal crossing parallel line. Students determine the sample space for simple experiments with equally likely outcomes and assign probabilities to those outcomes. They calculate mean, mode, median and range for data sets. They construct stem-and-leaf plots and dot-plots.

CONTENT

The Year 7 Maths curriculum is taught using the BitMaths online program. The BitMaths program covers mathematical concepts, problem-solving skills and reasoning through scaffolded teaching sequences and differentiated activities to ensure all students have success.

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 7 Mathematics:

  • Number and Place Value
  • Fractions, Decimals and Percentages
  • Real Numbers
  • Financial Maths
  • Area, Volume and Shape
  • Probability
  • Introduction to Algebra
  • Introduction to Data
  • Linear relationships
  • Geometry and Transformations

 

ASSESSMENT

Evidence of student achievement will be gathered through tests, investigations and other assessment tasks.

In semester 1 students investigate, compare and graph measures of average (mean, median and mode) from numerical and categorical data collected from other students. They will calculate area and volume of a range of quadrilaterals and composite shapes and draw and design 3D prisms. Students will be tested on their knowledge and understanding of fractions, decimals, percentages, rates and ratio.

In semester 2 students investigate algebraic notation, patterns and rules and draw conclusions based on relationships between weight and volume. They will construct sample spaces from equally likely outcomes, calculate and determine the probability of events occurring from a given sample space and compare theoretical and experimental data sets. Students will be tested on their knowledge and understanding on orders of operation, variables and substitution in algebra, the Cartesian plane, transformations and angles.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowing and understanding

Criteria B: Investigating patterns

Criteria C: Communicating

Criteria D: Applying mathematics in real-life contexts.

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Physical Education and Specialist Football - Soccer

HEALTHY LIFESTYLES*

The Healthy Lifestyle unit is the first unit students have in engaging with the compulsory Physical and Health Education curriculum at Le Fevre High School. Students will continue to build on their knowledge, understanding and movement skills to achieve successful outcomes in classroom, leisure, social, movement and online situations. Health and Physical Education is compulsory for one semester in years 7 to 10, however students can have the opportunity to further experience Physical Education with an additional elective semester offered to students in Year 8 to 10.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. This course will provide students with opportunities to learn about and experience aspects of health and physical activity. The focus is on developing skills and improving performance in games and sports, understanding movement skills, challenge and adventure activities, active play and minor games, rhythmic and expressive activities and a lifelong healthy lifestyle.

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Active/Minor Games
  • Invasion Games
  • Striking/Fielding Games
  • Net/Wall Games
  • Rhythmic & Expressive Movement
  • Challenge & Adventure
  • Safety & Risk
  • Food & Nutrition
  • Relationships & Sexuality (Shine Program)

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

SPECIALIST FOOTBALL - SOCCER

The Specialist Football unit of Physical and Health Education is a selected unit for one semester for any Year 7 student wishing to elect to do a unit of Physical Education with a specialist element of Football at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to extend student’s knowledge and understanding of movement skills with relation to Football, which will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in the Football program in Year 11. Students will be required to complete the compulsory elements of Health and Physical Education of the Australian Curriculum in Years 7 to 10 throughout this subject.

 CONTENT

The Specialist Football program enables students with a passion for soccer to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in all aspects of football including playing, rules, and fitness components and training principles. Students within the program are given the opportunity to receive specialist skills coaching, fitness development and access to quality training facilities. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Skill and Performance development
  • Performance Analysis
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition for Football
  • Injury Prevention and Management

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher. There is no course fee for Football in Year 7, however students wanting to represent the school are also encouraged to pay the Sports Program Fee ($95 in 2023), which covers all sport fees for the year, otherwise individual competition fees will apply.

IMG_9942 (Medium)

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

Science

SCIENCE*

In Year 7 Science, students describe techniques to separate pure substances from mixtures. They represent and predict the effects of unbalanced forces, including Earth’s gravity, on motion. They explain how the relative positions of Earth, the sun and moon affect phenomena on Earth. They analyse how the sustainable use of resources depends on the way they are formed and cycle through Earth systems. They predict the effect of human and environmental changes on interactions between organisms and classify and organise diverse organisms based on observable differences. Students describe situations where scientific knowledge from different science disciplines and diverse cultures has been used to solve a real-world problem. They explain implications of the solution for different groups in society.

Students identify questions that can be investigated scientifically. They plan fair experimental methods, identifying variables to be changed and measured. They select equipment that improves fairness and accuracy and describe how they considered safety. Students draw on evidence to support their conclusions. They summarise data from different sources, describe trends and refer to the quality of their data when suggesting improvements to their methods. They communicate their ideas, methods and findings using scientific language and appropriate representations.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 7 Science:

  • Separating Mixtures
  • Water
  • Classification of Living Things
  • Food Webs and Food Chains
  • Forces and Simple Machines
  • Cycles of the Earth, Moon and Sun

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed through a range of tests, assignments and practical reports. Students use the scientific method to conduct investigations, collect, analyse and communicate results.

In semester 1 students study chemical and biological sciences. In chemical sciences, students will use a range of separation techniques to separate a dry heterogenous mixture and explore the environment and economic effects of wet wipes on the environment. In biological sciences, students investigate how different factors, such as temperature and environment, affects rates of decomposition. Students will also be tested on their knowledge and understanding of classifications of animals and plants.

In semester 2 students study physical and earth and space sciences. In physical sciences, students explore a range of balanced and unbalanced forces, investigate the relationship between changing friction and work and investigate how simple machines can also be used to reduce work done. In earth and space sciences, students investigate the impacts of space science careers or how scientists have helped changed our understanding of space sciences. Students will be tested on their knowledge and understanding of forces in space.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowledge and Understanding

Criteria B: Inquiring and Designing

Criteria C: Processing and Evaluating

Criteria D: Reflection on the Impact of Science

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes
Print

Subject

Arts: Art, Dance, Drama, Music

DANCE - PERFORMING ARTS

Introduction to the study of Dance as a Performing Art: technique, performance, composition and appreciation as an audience.

If you have ever wanted to learn how to dance, this is your opportunity! By the end of year 8, students will have the chance to learn various styles of dance including Hip Hop, Contemporary and Cultural Dance. Through practical workshops and theoretical lessons students will:

  • Apply the “Elements of Dance” and choreographic devices to create their own compositions in groups
  • Evaluate how different cultures from around the world and throughout time communicate and express themselves through Dance
  • Analyse Dance company performances to identify how technical and production elements create aesthetic appeal
  • Perform their own choreographed sequences and learn the technical and expressive skills appropriate to various dance styles

 

ASSESSMENT

Participation in workshops, group composition tasks, performance, process journal and written reports using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

 

Dance

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

DRAMA - PERFORMING ARTS

By the end of Year 8, students will have explored mime, voice, improvisation and movement in a practical learning environment. They will also be introduced to the technical side of theatre and gain a basic insight into stagecraft elements such as lighting, sound, costume and set design. Students will have the opportunity to apply this knowledge in drama to make and perform. They will also explore different cultures, times and places and communicate their understandings through drama. Students will collaborate with one another to devise, interpret and perform drama. Students will manipulate the elements of drama, narrative and structure to express and communicate meaning. They will apply different performance styles and conventions to convey status, relationships and intention. Performance skills and design elements will be applied to shape and focus theatrical effect for an audience.

ASSESSMENT

Workshops, mime, improvisation, performance, written reviews, reflective journals and written reports using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

 

DSC_0857

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

MEDIA ARTS & DESIGN

Media arts involves creating representations of the world and telling stories through communications technologies such as television, film, video, newspapers, radio, video games, the internet and mobile media. Media arts connects audiences, purposes and ideas, exploring concepts and viewpoints through the creative use of materials and technologies.

Students will develop their knowledge of how ideas and intentions are communicated through media arts. They will build on and refine their knowledge, understanding and skills through media arts practices such as film and photography.

ASSESSMENT

Finished Media Arts works and process journal, folio of skill development on Photoshop and Adobe Creative Cloud, and written reviews using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

Course
Semester Elective

MUSIC- PERFORMING ARTS

Music in Year 8 provides an opportunity to explore and play a variety of musical instruments through practical workshops and equips students with the fundamentals of music theory and history. A range of music technology is used as a part of the composition component of the course and students will enjoy the satisfaction of creating their own pieces. Students will also have the opportunity to rehearse and perform songs as a class and in small groups. This course caters for students of all ability levels and experience.

Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

ASSESSMENT

Participation in group composition tasks, performances, tests and written assignments using IBMYP criteria and aligned with the Australian curriculum.

music

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

VISUAL ART*

Students explore how Artists communicate.

Knowing: the Elements of Art, artworks from different cultures/times/places, communication techniques.

Developing Skills: using a range of media- painting, drawing, mixed media, printing. Exploring techniques and processes.

Thinking Creatively: plan their art making in response to exploration of techniques, and creating meaning.

Reflecting: responding to artist’s works, and their own works.

ASSESSMENT

Finished art pieces, written and oral responses that demonstrate a student’s specialized vocabulary, IBMYP process journal.

NOTE: This subject is chosen as 1 Term elective.  Two Terms of Arts Electives build a Semester of Art in Year 8. Students must choose two different electives with two reserve choices.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Design & Technology: Health & Home Economics

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY*

The course develops familiarity with a range of materials, tools, machines and processes as well as skills in design, problem solving, decision-making, researching and the application of information.

Students are given experience in working with various materials and systems (wood, metal, plastics, electrical circuits and Computer Aided Design). Students design and make projects as well as learning about tools, processes, materials and electricity. Working cooperatively and safely is emphasised.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed in the areas of the design cycle, practical skills and knowledge as well as environmental concerns and safety.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

DESIGN: DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY*

Digital Technologies empowers students to shape change by influencing how contemporary and emerging information systems and practices are applied to meet current and future needs.

This subject is an integrated approach to teaching technology. The Digital Technologies Curriculum is introduced to students via the following:

· Block Coding using Web-based Learning Tools – code.org

· General-purpose Programming Language – Python

· Pseudo Code – Plain English planning using both Written & Graphical means

· Data & Networks – Binary Code & Data Transfer within Networks

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the ‘Design Cycle’ approach to projects, design, make, evaluate using IB

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

DESIGN: HOME ECONOMICS*

The main two areas of study are:

Food: Students are introduced to issues related to safety and hygiene in the food area. Fundamental food preparation techniques are used during practical lessons to design, plan and produce quality healthy lunches and incorporate principles of the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

Textiles:  Students will have the opportunity to use appropriate techniques and sewing machine equipment to create a textile item. They will learn compare and evaluate similar textile products, draw patterns, concepts and design as well as an appreciation of textiles and its uses.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment in each area is based on the Design Cycle using IB Criteria:

  • Inquiring and analysing
  • Developing Ideas
  • Creating the solution
  • Evaluating

Assessment Types include:

Assessment tasks, practical work and analysis of work completed

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

English

ENGLISH*

In Year 8 English, students will read, view and analyse a range of texts eg Poetry, Prose, Drama, Visual, Short Pieces, Multimedia and Electronic texts

Listen to, evaluate and produce a range of spoken texts, eg Anecdotes, Debates, Multimedia Presentations, Poetry Performances, Formal Speeches and Social Issue Reports

Compose a range of texts – written and multimedia for particular audiences, purposes and contexts.

The nature of the texts students study and produce will become more complex from Year 8 to Year 9. There will always be an emphasis on exploring issues relevant to adolescents and an approach that allows students to engage with aspects of our society including its diverse cultural aspects. At each year level, students will develop skills in understanding the language of different texts and acquire strategies to help them compose their own texts.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will:

  • Listen to spoken texts, examine spoken texts and produce spoken texts
  • Read and view texts
  • Compose written and multimedia texts
  • Engage in associated language activities.

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Individuals and Societies

INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETY*

In year 8 students will study one semester of History and one semester of Geography:

History: The course consists of an overview and 3 in-depth studies. Students will study the Ancient to the Modern World (c.650 – c.1750) including Medieval History, Feudal Japan and the Spanish Conquest of the Aztecs. A strong emphasis will be placed on bringing history alive and examining relevancy of how the past informs the present.

Geography: The course adopts an inquiry-based approach to Landscapes and Personal and Community Geographies. A strong emphasis will be placed on the interactivity of geography and the way we live in and with the world.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will complete Source and Data Analyses, Investigative reports, Immersive Assignments, Imaginative and Analytical Essays, Visual and Oral Presentations.

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Indonesian

LANGUAGE ACQUISTION*

“Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things.” – Flora Lewis (Journalist)

Speaking another language is possible for everyone!  This course provides opportunities for students to further develop their confidence and fluency in Indonesian through a range of topics that build on their previous year’s learning. Prior knowledge of the language is valued but not essential, with a range of language-learner backgrounds and experience being catered for.

Students’ increase their ability to speak, listen, read, and write in Indonesian, as well as their skills in English and problem-solving.  This strengthens and reinforces learning from their other subjects.

A variety of cultural experiences are also provided which, along with their language skills, create inter-cultural competence for our learners – a highly sought-after attribute in the world today.

 ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the IBMYP Criteria in the following areas:

  • Comprehending spoken and visual text
  • Comprehending written and visual text
  • Communicating in response to spoken, written and visual text
  • Using language in spoken and written form

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Mathematics

MATHEMATICS*

In Year 8 Mathematics, students solve everyday problems involving rates, ratios and percentages. They describe index laws and apply them to whole numbers. They describe rational and irrational numbers. Students solve problems involving profit and loss. They make connections between expanding and factorising algebraic expressions. Students solve problems relating to the volume of prisms. They make sense of time duration in real applications. They identify conditions for the congruence of triangles and deduce the properties of quadrilaterals. Students model authentic situations with two-way tables and Venn diagrams. They choose appropriate language to describe events and experiments. They explain issues related to the collection of data and the effect of outliers on means and medians in that data.

Students use efficient mental and written strategies to carry out the four operations with integers. They simplify a variety of algebraic expressions. They solve linear equations and graph linear relationships on the Cartesian plane. Students convert between units of measurement for area and volume. They perform calculations to determine perimeter and area of parallelograms, rhombuses and kites. They name the features of circles and calculate the areas and circumferences of circles. Students determine the probabilities of complementary events and calculate the sum of probabilities.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 8 Mathematics:

  • Integers and Indices
  • Fractions, Decimals and Percentages
  • Rates and Ratios
  • Algebra
  • Measurement
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Linear Graphs and Equations
  • Geometric Reasoning

 

ASSESSMENT
Evidence of student achievement will be gathered through tests, investigations and other assessment tasks.

In semester 1 students will complete a research task on integers and indices and how this relates to units of temperature, represent statistical data using fractions, decimals and percentages, and use algebra to calculate doses of medicine to be administered at different ages. Students will be tested on their knowledge and understanding of integers and indices, fractions, decimals and percentages, and algebra.

In semester 2 students will complete a research investigation into the value of pi. They will also be tested on their knowledge and understanding of measurement, statistics and probability, linear graphs, and ratio and rates.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowing and understanding

Criteria B: Investigating patterns

Criteria C: Communicating

Criteria D: Applying mathematics in real-life contexts.

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Physical Education and Specialist Football - Soccer

HEALTHY LIFESTYLES*

The Healthy Lifestyle unit of Physical and Health Education is a compulsory curriculum for one semester for all Year 8 students at Le Fevre High School. Students will continue to build on leisure and social knowledge, understanding of movement skills and take positive action to enhance their own and others’ health, safety and wellbeing. Students will continue a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Years 9 and 10 as well as have the opportunity for further Physical Education experience by selecting an additional elective semester of Physical Education in Years 8 to 10.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. This course will provide students with opportunities to learn about and experience aspects of health and physical activity. The focus is on developing skills and improving performance in games and sports, fundamental movement challenges, tactical learning and spatial awareness as well as a lifelong healthy lifestyle. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Active/Minor Games
  • Striking/Fielding Games: Avoid getting out
  • Tactical Development: Moving to Space & Defending space
  • Skill Development: Data collection
  • Safety; Smoking and Vaping
  • Health Benefits of Physical Activity
  • Relationships & Sexuality (Shine Program)

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

This unit of Physical and Health Education is an elective unit for one semester for any Year 8 students wishing to select a second unit of Physical Education at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to extend student’s knowledge and understanding of movement skills, which will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in Physical Education in Year 11 and Year 12. Students will still be required to complete a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Years 8 to 10 in addition to this elective subject.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. This course will provide students with opportunities to learn about and experience aspects of health and physical activity. The focus is on developing movement skills and improving performance in games and sports, fundamental movement challenges, tactical learning and spatial awareness as well as a lifelong healthy lifestyle. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Active/Minor Games
  • Invasion Games: Create Space & Defend Space
  • Tactical Development: Moving to Space & Defending space
  • Skill Development: Data collection
  • Maintaining & Regaining Possession

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

Course
Semester Elective

SPECIALIST FOOTBALL - SOCCER

This unit of Physical and Health Education is an elective unit for the year for any Year 8 students wishing to select a second unit of Physical Education with a specialist element of Football at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to extend student’s knowledge and understanding of movement skills with relation to Football, which will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in the Football program in Year 11. Students will remain in this class to complete the compulsory elements of the Health and Physical Education curriculum in Years 8 to 10 in addition to this elective subject.

 CONTENT

The Specialist Football Program enables students with a passion for soccer to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in all aspects of football including playing, rules, and fitness components and training principles. Students within the program are given the opportunity to receive specialist skills coaching, fitness development and access to quality training facilities. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Skill and Performance development
  • Performance Analysis
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition for Football
  • Injury Prevention and Management

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher. There is a $100 (plus GST) course fee for Football in Year 8, which will include the purchase of a School Football uniform which will be worn during lessons and competitions throughout the five years.

 

Course
Semester Elective

Science

SCIENCE*

In Year 8 Science, students compare physical and chemical changes and use the particle model to explain and predict the properties and behaviours of substances. They identify different forms of energy and describe how energy transfers and transformations cause change in simple systems. They compare processes of rock formation, including the timescales involved. They analyse the relationship between structure and function at cell, organ and body system levels. Students examine the different science knowledge used in occupations. They explain how evidence has led to an improved understanding of a scientific idea and describe situations in which scientists collaborated to generate solutions to contemporary problems. They reflect on implications of these solutions for different groups in society.

 

Students identify and construct questions and problems that they can investigate scientifically. They consider safety and ethics when planning investigations, including designing field or experimental methods. They identify variables to be changed, measured and controlled. Students construct representations of their data to reveal and analyse patterns and trends and use these when justifying their conclusions. They explain how modifications to methods could improve the quality of their data and apply their own scientific knowledge and investigation findings to evaluate claims made by others. They use appropriate language and representations to communicate science ideas, methods and findings in a range of text types.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 8 Science:

  • Life Under a Microscope
  • Functioning Organisms
  • Making Things Happen
  • The Nature of Matter
  • Making New Substances
  • The Changing Earth

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed through a range of tests, assignments and practical reports.

In semester 1, students research nuclear power and whether it should be used in Australia. Students observe different types of chemical reactions, and measure the energy found in different foods. They investigate how enzymes aid digestion. Students research organ donation and how cancer may be treated or cured in the future.

In semester 2 students investigate how changing temperature affects rates of reactions and the causes of different crystal sizes in rocks. They research an element from the Periodic Table and how its uses have changed over time.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowledge and Understanding

Criteria B: Inquiring and Designing

Criteria C: Processing and Evaluating

Criteria D: Reflection on the Impact of Science

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes
Print

Subject

Arts: Art, Dance, Drama, Music

DANCE

By the end of year 9, students develop knowledge, understanding and skills of dance as an art form through choreography and performance. They make and respond to dance works, working in small groups to manipulate the elements of dance to communicate intent. They discover new movement possibilities and develop proficiency as they refine technical and expressive skills to convey different dance techniques, such as Hip Hop, Jazz and Contemporary.

Technique: Developing skills in jazz, contemporary/traditional and hip hop dance styles.

Composition: Students learn skills to create their own dance choreography pieces by exploring movement through a variety of tasks based on themes, ideas and choreographic devices.

Performance: Students have the opportunity to perform at various school and community events, as well as ongoing presentations in class.

Appreciation: students develop evaluative skills as they reflect on their own and other choreographers’’ use of the elements of dance to communicate intent. They investigate dance in Australia and make connections to international contexts.

 

ASSESSMENT

Participation in workshops, technique execution, composition tasks, performance or presentation, process journal and written responses using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

DRAMA - PERFORMING ARTS

By the end of Year 9 students will be familiar with various styles of theatre and theatre conventions. They will have undertaken practical workshop activities to develop their understanding of theatre styles. Students will collaborate with one another to apply this knowledge to devise, interpret and create performances to share in class. Students will attend live theatre and analyse the various stage craft and performance elements both in verbal discussion and in written reviews. This greater understanding will be applied to their performances of scripted drama in the development of various roles and characters and in the manipulation of the performance space.

Students will collaborate with others to plan, direct, produce, rehearse and refine performances. They will select and use the elements of drama, narrative and structure in directing, blocking and acting in order to engage audiences. They will refine performance and expressive skills in voice and movement to convey dramatic action.

ASSESSMENT

Workshops, improvisation, performance and small group production, written reviews, reflective journals and written reports using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

MEDIA ARTS & VISUAL DESIGN

This subject is for students who enjoy being creative and would like to explore the exciting and varied world of Design in the context of Graphics and Digital Media.

  • Students use the Design Process to produce a range of products like logos, posters, and packaging
  • Students explore creative thinking processes and the elements and principles of design
  • Students develop skills with Photoshop and other digital technologies

 

ASSESSMENT

Finished Design works and process journal, folio of skill development on Photoshop, and written reviews using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

Course
Semester Elective

MUSIC - PERFORMING ARTS

Music in Year 9 provides students with the opportunity to extend their musical knowledge through workshops, performances, composition tasks and theoretical classes. By the end of Year 9 music, students will be able to read and write music using basic notation and will begin to use this knowledge to form their own original compositions. Students will be taught analytical skills and begin to interpret the different elements of music including aural analysis, pitch, notation, rhythm defining characteristics from different musical styles and cultures.

Students will be asked to focus on their instrument of their choice for practical lessons and performances, both in class and publicly at school assemblies. To assist with this, it is highly advisable that students have their own instrument so they can practice at home. Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

This course caters for students of all ability levels and experience and provides an excellent foundation for further music study in later school years.

ASSESSMENT

Performances, tests and written assignments using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

 

music

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

VISUAL ART

In year 9, students evaluate how visual art form communicates artistic intentions in artworks that the students make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. Students analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others ideas. They identify influences of other artists’ on their own artworks.

Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine these to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks.

ASSESSMENT

Finished Art pieces, written and oral responses that demonstrate a student’s specialized vocabulary, IBMYP Process journal.

Course
Semester Elective

Design & Technology: Health & Home Economics

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY / METAL

This course will introduce students to aspects of engineering, construction and maritime shipbuilding industry. Students will learn welding, fabrication and machining skills and processes. Students use the design and realisation process to engineer solutions for the development of products or systems.

Students will be given the opportunity to:

  • Learn to create a design brief that provides the basis for the development of potential solutions to design problems.
  • Review design features, processes, materials and production techniques to assist with the realisation of the solution. A solution in this subject is an outcome of the design and realisation process in relation to the chosen context.
  • Analyse influences on a product or system including ethical, legal, economic, and/or sustainability issues.
  • Consider the practical implication of these issues on society or design solutions.
  • Use new and evolving technologies.
  • Apply appropriate skills, processes, procedures and techniques whilst implementing safe work practices in the creation of the solution. Learn to use the industry standard Autodesk Inventor software to design, create, model and assemble 3-dimensional objects.

 

Assessment:

Students are assessed against the MYP Design Cycle and Australian Curriculum Standard 9/10.

Course
Semester Elective

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY / TIMBER

Technologies aims to develop creative and innovative problem solving. Students will analyse problems, design and create solutions and evaluate their outcomes. Students will engage in contemporary and emerging technologies using design thinking strategies.

Students will be given the opportunity to:

  • Produce designed solutions using a variety of material options (wood/metal/plastic/paper) within a workshop environment
  • Work independently and collaboratively to develop innovative solutions using the Design Cycle.
  • Analyse influences on a product or system including ethical, legal, economic, and/or sustainability issues.
  • Engage in the product development process using design thinking
  • Design products using industry standard 3D modelling software

 

Assessment:

Students are assessed against the MYP Design Cycle and Australian Curriculum Standard 9/10.

Course
Semester Elective

DESIGN: DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

Digital Technologies provides students with practical opportunities to use design thinking and to be innovative developers of digital solutions and knowledge. The subject helps students to become innovative creators of digital solutions, effective users of digital systems and critical consumers of information conveyed by digital systems.

This subject is an integrated approach to teaching technology. The Digital Technologies Curriculum is introduced to students via the following:

· Programming Structures – Sequence, Selection & Iteration

· Excel Spreadsheets – Performing Simple Coded Functions

· Text-based Game Design & Construction using a General-purpose Programming Language – Python

· Pseudo Code – Plain English planning using both Written & Graphical means

· Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Robotics – LEGO Mindstorms

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the ‘Design Cycle’ approach to projects, design, make, evaluate using IB criterion (A,B,C,D)

Course
Semester Elective

DESIGN: ENTERPRISE EDUCATION

Students to use entrepreneurial capabilities and the design cycle to create their own small business concept and product.

Student will design, create, brand and market a product. Products could have a social issues focus or recycle/new focus. Products created could come under the headings of jewellery, home solutions/decor, fashion, textiles, wood, metal or mixed materials.

2 Full Design cycles in the semester. 1 for product design – 1 for branding/marketing.

End of semester showcase/ market afternoon of products to school community.

Course
Semester Elective

DESIGN: HOME ECONOMICS

The main two areas of study are:

  • Food Preparation enables students to extend their skills introduced in Year 8. Students will work in a team environment and share equipment and resources. Gourmet breakfast meals, vegetarian and cereal-based dishes will be prepared by the students. Health risks associated with take away, high fat, sugar and low fibre diets are also researched and discussed
  • Textiles, design and construction enables students to extend their knowledge of textiles and practical skills developed in Year 8. Use of commercial patterns and construction of a designer bag to save the environment is the main focus. A major research assignment on a man-made fibre of choice is undertaken to extend the student’s understanding of construction and design concepts.

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed on the design cycle using IB criteria

A: Inquiring and analyzing

B: Developing Ideas

C: Creating the solution

D: Evaluating; assessment tasks, practical work and evaluations.

Course
Semester Elective

English

ENGLISH*

In Year 9 English, students will read, view and analyse a range of texts eg Poetry, Prose, Drama, Visual, Short Pieces, Multimedia and Electronic texts

Listen to, evaluate and produce a range of spoken texts, eg Anecdotes, Debates, Multimedia Presentations, Poetry Performances, Formal Speeches and Social Issue Reports

Compose a range of texts – written and multimedia for particular audiences, purposes and contexts.

The nature of the texts students study and produce will become more complex from Year 8 to Year 9. There will always be an emphasis on exploring issues relevant to adolescents and an approach that allows students to engage with aspects of our society including its diverse cultural aspects. At each year level, students will develop skills in understanding the language of different texts and acquire strategies to help them compose their own texts.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will:

  • Listen to spoken texts, examine spoken texts and produce spoken texts
  • Read and view texts
  • Compose written and multimedia texts
  • Engage in associated language activities

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Individuals and Societies

INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES*

In Year 9 students will study 2 terms of History and 2 terms of Geography:

History: The course consists of an overview and 3 in depth studies. Students will study the Modern World (1750 -1918) including Making a Nation, Industrial Revolution and World War 1. A strong emphasis will be placed on bringing history alive and examining the relevance of how history informs the present. Issues in present day society that have their roots in these time periods will be analysed.

Geography: The course adopts an inquiry based approach to Biomes and Food Security and Global Connections. A strong emphasis will be placed on interactivity and creative ways of exploring the world around us.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will complete Source and Data Analyses, Investigative Reports, Immersive Assignments, Imaginative and Analytical Essays, Visual and Oral Presentations

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Indonesian

LANGUAGE ACQUISITION*

“You live a new life for every new language you speak. If you know only one language, you live only once.” ‒ Czech Proverb

Being able to communicate in another language is available to everyone at Le Fevre High School.

Students will leave this course with the ability to communicate in Indonesian on a wide variety of topics which are both relevant and useful to them. Their confidence and ability with speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Indonesian will provide them with intercultural competence and problem-solving skills for the workforce and life.  Their understanding of English will be enhanced through the learning experiences they are provided with.

They will journey further through Indonesia’s culture via the arts, food and many other learning experiences made available to them.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the IBMYP Criteria in the following areas:

  • Comprehending spoken and visual text
  • Comprehending written and visual text
  • Communicating in response to spoken, written and visual text
  • Using language in spoken and written form

 

indo 1jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Mathematics

MATHEMATICS*

In Year 9 Mathematics, students solve problems involving simple interest. They interpret ratio and scale factors in similar figures. Students explain similarity of triangles. They recognise the connections between similarity and the trigonometric ratios. Students compare techniques for collecting data from primary and secondary sources. They make sense of the position of the mean and median in skewed, symmetric and bi-modal displays to describe and interpret data.

Students apply the index laws to numbers and express numbers in scientific notation. They expand binomial expressions. They find the distance between two points on the Cartesian plane and the gradient and midpoint of a line segment. They sketch linear and non-linear relations. Students calculate areas of shapes and the volume and surface area of right prisms and cylinders. They use Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometry to find unknown sides of right-angled triangles. Students calculate relative frequencies to estimate probabilities, list outcomes for two-step experiments and assign probabilities for those outcomes. They construct histograms and back-to-back stem-and-leaf plots.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 9 Mathematics:

  • Pythagoras and Trigonometry
  • Indices
  • Distributive Law
  • Measurement
  • Coordinate Geometry
  • Linear Relationships
  • Statistics
  • Probability
  • Financial Mathematics
  • Similarity

 

ASSESSMENT

Evidence of student achievement will be gathered through tests, investigations and other assessment tasks.

In semester 1 students complete a research task on the surface area to volume ratio of cubes, “squared” cylinders and spheres in order to analyse why cargo ships are so large. There are tests for each topic covered.

In semester 2 collect data from other Year 9s and analyse it using statistical measures. They investigate the chance of certain events occurring. They use coordinate geometry to solve problems around the house. There are tests for each topic covered.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowing and understanding

Criteria B: Investigating patterns

Criteria C: Communicating

Criteria D: Applying mathematics in real-life contexts.

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Physical Education and Specialist Football - Soccer

HEALTHY LIFESTYLES*

The Healthy Lifestyle unit of Physical and Health Education is a compulsory curriculum for one semester for all Year 9 students at Le Fevre High School. Students will continue to build on leisure and social knowledge, understanding of movement skills and take positive action to enhance their own and others’ health, safety and wellbeing. Students will continue a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Year 9 and in Year 10, as well as have the opportunity for further Physical Education experience by selecting an additional elective semester of Physical Education in Years 9 and 10.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. This course will provide students with opportunities to learn about and experience aspects of health and physical activity. The focus is on developing skills and improving performance in games and sports, fundamental movement challenges, tactical learning and spatial awareness as well as a lifelong healthy lifestyle. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Field Invasion Games – Set up play and Defend the goal
  • Court Invasion Games
  • Challenge Games – Kayak
  • Court Divided Games – Defend attack and Set up attack
  • Safety
  • Food and Nutrition
  • Relationships and Sexual Health (Shine Program)

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

This unit of Physical and Health Education is an elective unit for one semester for any Year 9 students wishing to choose to select a second unit of Physical Education at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to further extend the range of sports and activities that students have covered in the compulsory course and will increase student’s knowledge and understanding of movement skills, which will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in Physical Education in Year 11 and Year 12. Students will still be required to complete a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Years 9 to 10 in addition to this elective subject.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. Physical Education elective course will develop and build on knowledge and understanding of human movement including:

  • Data collection in Sport
  • Sports Psychology
  • Group Dynamics
  • Individual Skill Development
  • Volleyball
  • Basketball

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

 

Course
Semester Elective

SPECIALIST FOOTBALL - SOCCER

This unit of Physical and Health Education is an elective unit for one semester for any Year 9 students wishing to choose to select a second unit of Physical Education with a specialist element of Football at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to extend student’s knowledge and understanding of movement skills with relation to Football, which will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in the Football program in Year 11. Students will still be required to complete a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Years 9 and 10 in addition to this elective subject.

 CONTENT

The Specialist Football Program enables students with a passion for soccer to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in all aspects of football including playing, rules, and fitness components and training principles. Students within the program are given the opportunity to receive specialist skills coaching, fitness development and access to quality training facilities. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Skill and Performance development
  • Performance Analysis
  • Fitness
  • Psychology for Football
  • Group Dynamics

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher. There is a $70 (plus GST) course fee for Football in Year 9 for students wanting to represent the school in regular competitions.

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

Science

SCIENCE*

In Year 9 Science, students explain chemical processes and natural radioactivity in terms of atoms and energy transfers and describe examples of important chemical reactions. They describe models of energy transfer and apply these to explain phenomena. They explain global features and events in terms of geological processes and timescales. They analyse how biological systems function and respond to external changes with reference to interdependencies, energy transfers and flows of matter. They describe social and technological factors that have influenced scientific developments and predict how future applications of science and technology may affect people’s lives.

Students design questions that can be investigated using a range of inquiry skills. They design methods that include the control and accurate measurement of variables and systematic collection of data and describe how they considered ethics and safety. They analyse trends in data, identify relationships between variables and reveal inconsistencies in results. They analyse their methods and the quality of their data and explain specific actions to improve the quality of their evidence. They evaluate others’ methods and explanations from a scientific perspective and use appropriate language and representations when communicating their findings and ideas to specific audiences.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 9 Science:

  • Inside the Atom
  • Chemical Change
  • Energy on the Move
  • Ecosystems
  • Responding to the World
  • Movement on the Earth’s Surfaces

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed through a range of tests, assignments and practical reports.

In semester 1, students investigate come from and research and come up with their own opinion whether nuclear power should be used in Australia. Students measure the energy found in different foods. They research a contagious disease and how its spread can be minimised.

In semester 2 students investigate how their reaction times can be affected and how buildings can be better designed in earthquake prone areas. They research how bionic devices can improve the lives of their users and what the ideal car colour for Australia’s climate is.

During Year 9, all students will be given the opportunity to participate in the Kayaking Interdisciplinary Unit as part of their compulsory curriculum. Aspects of Science (Ecosystems) and HPE (Safety) are linked to create an engaging program that investigates the sustainable utilisation of the Port River Barler Inlet Estuary. Students will engage in both theoretical concepts at school and practical kayaking excursions at West Lakes and Garden Island.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowledge and Understanding

Criteria B: Inquiring and Designing

Criteria C: Processing and Evaluating

Criteria D: Reflection on the Impact of Science

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes
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Subject

Additional Electives

INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES - GEOGRAPHY

Students have a choice to study two semesters of Individuals and Societies. The elective component of this course is Geography.

Geography: The course adopts an Inquiry based approach to Environmental Challenges and Geography and Global Well Being.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will complete Source and Data Analyses, Investigative Reports, Imaginative and Analytical Essays, Visual and Oral Presentations.

Course
Semester Elective

INDONESIAN - CONTINUERS

Students wishing to study Stage 1 Indonesian are encouraged to elect to study this pre-SACE option to support them with developing the appropriate skills and knowledge base to best support this pathway. Similar to the compulsory descriptor for Year 10 Indonesian; students can expect to become practical users of Indonesian. They will cover a variety of themes, which at times will be similar to the Year 10 course but with an added focus on themes touched upon in Stage 1 Indonesian. Such themes could include:

  • The Individual (eg sport and recreation, personal world)
  • The Indonesian-speaking Communities (eg visiting Indonesia, religion, gender)
  • The Changing World (eg environment, youth issues)

Through these themes, the students develop a deeper understanding and confidence in their knowledge and expression of Indonesian, preparing them well for Stage 1 and beyond.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the IBMYP Criteria in the following areas:

  • Comprehending spoken and visual text
  • Comprehending written and visual text
  • Communicating in response to spoken, written and visual text
  • Using language in spoken and written form

 

Course
Semester Elective

OUTDOOR EDUCATION

Outdoor Education provides Year 10 students the opportunity to extend their learning outside of the classroom by engaging in a range of learning experiences that challenge the individual. This subject is offered in addition to the Healthy Lifestyles course (one compulsory semester) and Physical Education (elective semester option).

Content

The Year 10 Outdoor Education program is designed to provide students with both individual, group responsibility and resilience in the outdoor setting.  The aims of the course are to develop group dynamics, teamwork, communication, leadership skills and to develop necessary knowledge and understanding around planning adventurous journeys.

Students will participate in the following practical activities:

  • Orienteering (via Kayaking and by foot)
  • First Aid (Full day course)
  • Bush Walking
  • Overnight Camp (2 nights)
  • Bouldering

 

Assessment

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

Special Requirements

Please be mindful, while Le Fevre High School supports the Outdoor Education Program and allocates funding towards its administration, an additional fee of $200.00 is associated with student’s participation, which includes students fully accredited first aid course and camp fees.

Course
Semester Elective

Arts: Art, Dance, Drama, Music

DANCE

By the end of year 10, students will have developed Contemporary and Hip Hop Dance technique and Performance Skills that will provide a foundation for further studies in Dance. The semester long Dance course covers four areas:

Technique: Developing skills in contemporary and hip hop dance styles.

Composition: Students learn skills to create their own dance choreography pieces by exploring movement through a variety of tasks based on themes, ideas and choreographic devices.

Performance: Students have the opportunity to perform at various school and community events, in contemporary, jazz and/or hip hop, as well as ongoing presentations in class.

Appreciation: Students are given research tasks and projects in order to develop their knowledge of dance history and dance in today’s society.

 

ASSESSMENT

Participation in workshops, technique execution, composition tasks, performance or presentation, process journal and written responses using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum

Course
Semester Elective

DRAMA - PERFORMING ARTS

By the end of Year 10, students will have developed a comprehensive understanding of the Stanislavski method of acting and / or a thorough understanding of Australian Drama. Students will undertake a variety of workshop activities and devised small group activities to develop a practical understanding of these specialised focus areas. Students will develop and sustain different roles and characters employing their knowledge of the Stanislavski method. Students will participate in a group production for a public audience and gain a practical understanding of the ‘page to stage’ process. They will have the opportunity to undertake both on stage and off stage roles. Through the production process students will realise the director’s intention in acting, design and development of all production elements. Students will attend and review live theatre and analyse the various stagecraft and performance elements of a theatrical production. Students will deconstruct a scripted text and select scenes for performance. They will collaborate with others to plan, direct, rehearse, refine and evaluate performances.

ASSESSMENT

Workshops, performance, group production, production report, written reviews, reflective journals and written assignments using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum.

Course
Semester Elective

MEDIA ART

Specialise in Digital Art, Illustration and 2D Animation.

Students explore how technology can foster personal expression in art. Students use Photoshop and Illustrator to create artworks exploring and reflecting their world. Work will be based on a range of historical and contemporary styles. Students also develop skills in 2D animation using Flash. Students study the Digital Media industry in relation to illustration, digital art and animation.

ASSESSMENT               

Practical Folios, assignments and homework tasks, use of specialist vocabulary, practical demonstration of skills, self-assessment and evaluation of artworks.

11 art & dm

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

MUSIC - PERFORMING ARTS

In Year 10, students study:

Practical: Students will have the opportunity to interpret, rehearse and perform solo or as an ensemble both to the class and publicly at school assemblies demonstrating technical and expressive practical skills in a range of styles.

Theory and History: Students will identify, analyse and notate music in a variety of different styles with an understanding of the context of society at that time.

Composition: Students will apply their theoretical knowledge to compose their own original pieces writing both melody and harmony. Opportunity will also be given for students to use technology to manipulate sound and make loops and beats.

Process Journal: Students reflect on the development of their musical skills and knowledge in written form.

Advice to students: It is highly advisable that students have their own instrument so they can practice at home. Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

 

ASSESSMENT

Performances, tests and written assignments using IBMYP criteria aligned with the Australian curriculum

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

VISUAL ART

In Year 10, students evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others ideas. They identify influences of other artists on their own artworks. Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks.

ASSESSMENT

Finished Art pieces, written and oral responses that demonstrate a student’s specialized vocabulary, IBMYP Process journal.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

VISUAL ART DESIGN

Specialise in Graphic Design and Digital Imaging.

Students explore how using the design process is a creative and efficient way of creating a graphic product suited to a particular audience. Students use Photoshop to design products. Students also explore graphic design from a historic, cultural and technological context. They analyse and evaluate works of design.

ASSESSMENT

Practical Folios, assignments and homework tasks, use of specialist vocabulary, practical demonstration of skills, self-assessment and evaluation of design works.

Year 10 D& Digital M

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

Design & Technology: Health & Home Economics

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY / METAL

This is a hands on practical based course the promotes the development of Engineering and STEM skills. Practical skill exercises will help develop the knowledge and understanding required to make design solutions to a design brief. The use of composite materials and new technologies will also be explored.

Fabrication skills include gas welding, MIG and Arc welding and the use of hand, power and machine tools.

Machining skills include accurate use of the metal lathe and hand tools.

Planning and organizing a task together with the safe use of tools and equipment are an essential component of the course.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed in the areas of design, practical skills, knowledge and understanding of the social implications of technology.

Course
Semester Elective

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY / TIMBER

The focus of this course is the development of skills and competencies in the use of multiple technologies and materials with a focus on timber. Student will produce solutions to design based practical tasks by following the design cycle process.

Technologies such as 3D printing, electronics, systems and control, laser cutting will be incorporated in this course. A strong emphasis is placed on the safety use of equipment and machinery.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed in the areas of design, practical skills, knowledge and their understanding of the social implications of technology.

Course
Semester Elective

DESIGN: ENTERPRISE EDUCATION

Entrepreneurial Education supports students to develop their Capabilities for work and life in a way that values their input, that caters for their diverse needs and interests and – most importantly – allows them to learn by finding and resolving real world problems worth solving. Students to use entrepreneurial capabilities and the design cycle to create their own small business concept, product and marketing.

Products will be created using the Design and Technology facilities.

Products created could come under the headings of jewellery, home solutions/decor, fashion, textiles, wood, metal or mixed materials.

2 Full Design cycles in the semester. 1 for product design – 1 for branding/marketing.

End of semester showcase/ market afternoon of products to school community.

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY A

Digital Technologies provides students with practical opportunities to use design thinking and to be innovative developers of digital solutions and knowledge. The subject helps students to become innovative creators of digital solutions, effective users of digital systems and critical consumers of information conveyed by digital systems.

Students will complete a range of Programming & Coded Activities with a focus on efficiency of Design & Operations, including: Selection, Iteration (Loops), Functions, etc. This course is designed to adequately prepare students for Senior Secondary Digital Technologies (SACE).

Investigation requirements include ‘The Impact of Computer Programs on Modern Life’ & Issues related to Online usage & presence. Topics for this Course will include:

· Programming Structures – Selection & Iteration

· General-purpose Programming Language – Python

· Pseudo Code – Plain English planning using both Written & Graphical means

· Internet Safety

· Computer Systems & our reliance on them

· Robotics – LEGO Mindstorms

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the ‘Design Cycle’ approach to projects, design, make, evaluate using IB criterion (A,B,C,D)

Course
Semester Elective

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY B

Digital Technologies provides students with practical opportunities to use design thinking and to be innovative developers of digital solutions and knowledge. The subject helps students to become innovative creators of digital solutions, effective users of digital systems and critical consumers of information conveyed by digital systems.

Students will complete a range of Programming & Coded Activities with a focus on efficiency of Design & Operations, including: Selection, Iteration (Loops), Functions, etc. This course is designed to adequately prepare students for Senior Secondary Digital Technologies (SACE).

Investigation requirements include ‘The Impact of Computer Programs on Modern Life’ & Issues related to Online usage & presence. Topics for this Course will include:

· Programming Structures – Selection & Iteration

· General-purpose Programming Language – Python

· Pseudo Code – Plain English planning using both Written & Graphical means

· Internet Safety

· Computer Systems & our reliance on them

· Robotics – LEGO Mindstorms

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the ‘Design Cycle’ approach to projects, design, make, evaluate using IB criterion (A,B,C,D)

Course
Semester Elective

HOME ECONOMICS – MULTI CULTURAL FOOD

This course focus on developing students’ understanding of the way cultural influences have affected food availability and choices in Australia. It also aims to further improve food preparation skills, recipe adaptation, time management, meal planning and creative presentation of food. Students prepare food and use equipment competently to successfully produce the following:

  • A variety of Indigenous Native food
  • Australian, British, European, Southeast Asian and North African dishes
  • A main course from a country of their choice
  • A variety of breads from around the country
  • Creative Baking

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in each area is based on the Design Cycle using IB Criteria

A: Inquiring and analysing

B: Developing Ideas

C: Creating the solution

D: Evaluating

A major research project on the production, availability and preparation techniques of food of a country of choice. Students self-assess their organisation and management skills as well as the completed food product, they suggest possible changes for improvements of the practical task completed. Students are required to participate in a teacher directed free choice practical and catering exercises as well as in the selection, production, packaging and marketing of baked products.

 

Assessment Types include:

Assessment tasks, investigations, practical work and evaluations

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

English

ENGLISH*

At Year 10, English is designed to prepare students for the study of English at SACE Stage 1. Students will be expected to demonstrate much greater control over language features, to have sensitivity to the needs of audiences and contexts and to be able to analyse demanding issues, themes and cultural values.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will:

  • Listening to spoken texts, examining spoken texts and producing spoken texts
  • Reading and viewing texts
  • Composing written and multimedia texts
  • Associated language activities

 

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Individuals and Societies

INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES*

Students will study 2 terms of History and can study 2 terms of either Justice, Power and Society or EDGE – Environmental Explorations.

History: The course consists of an overview and 3 in-depth studies. Students will study The Modern World and Australia, including World War 2, Rights and Freedoms and Migration.

Justice, Power and Society: The course develops student understandings of our Justice system, our Legal system and our Political system. It challenges students to explore issues of equity and social justice, and calls students to action to address current issues in Australia and beyond.

EDGE-Environmental Explorations: The course adopts an inquiry based approach to Exploring Demographics, Global Well-being and Environmental Challenges. The course takes us from all the way from our local Port (through a variety of excursions) to the world stage. Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will complete Source and Data Analyses, Investigative Reports, Imaginative and Analytical Essays, Visual and Oral Presentations.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the International Baccalaureate Assessment Criteria and will complete Source and Data Analyses, Investigative Reports, Imaginative and Analytical Essays, Visual and Oral Presentations.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Indonesian

LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

By the end of this course, students can expect to become reasonably confident, practical users of Indonesian with an understanding of the way the language works. They will cover a variety of themes with a strong focus on film,travel and celebrations. This course will continue to develop skills in speaking, reading, writing and listening in Indonesian. The year is enhanced by other learning experiences allowing the students to enjoy Indonesia’s rich culture.

This course is designed to prepare the students for Stage 1 Indonesian.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed using the IBMYP Criteria in the following areas:

  • Comprehending spoken and visual text
  • Comprehending written and visual text
  • Communicating in response to spoken, written and visual text
  • Using language in spoken and written form

 

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Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Mathematics

MATHEMATICS*

In Year 10 Mathematics, students recognise the connection between simple and compound interest. They solve problems involving linear equations and inequalities. They make the connections between algebraic and graphical representations of relations. Students solve surface area and volume problems relating to composite solids. They recognise the relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines. Students apply deductive reasoning to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes. They compare data sets by referring to the shapes of the various data displays. They describe bivariate data where the independent variable is time. Students describe statistical relationships between two continuous variables. They evaluate statistical reports.

Students expand binomial expressions and factorise monic quadratic expressions. They find unknown values after substitution into formulas. They perform the four operations with simple algebraic fractions. Students solve simple quadratic equations and pairs of simultaneous equations. They use triangle and angle properties to prove congruence and similarity. Students use trigonometry to calculate unknown angles in right-angled triangles. Students list outcomes for multi-step chance experiments and assign probabilities for these experiments. They calculate quartiles and inter-quartile ranges.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 9 Mathematics:

  • Measurement
  • Probability
  • Statistics
  • Patterns and Algebra
  • Linear and Non-linear relationships
  • Pythagoras and Trigonometry
  • Data Representation and Interpretation
  • Congruence and Similarity

 

ASSESSMENT

Evidence of student achievement will be gathered through tests, investigations and other assessment tasks.

In semester 1, students have a test for each topic. There is a surface area to volume ratio task in Measurement where they investigate why cells that make up living things are so small. In the Probability topic they discover the maths involved in games of chance and how they can increase their chances of winning. In statistics they find correlations between variables of their choosing.

In semester 2 there are also tests for each topic. Additionally, they use their knowledge of Pythagoras and Trigonometry to find the heights of objects around the school and local community. They investigate how interest rates and types of interest can affect their investments and repayments.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowing and understanding

Criteria B: Investigating patterns

Criteria C: Communicating

Criteria D: Applying mathematics in real-life contexts.

Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes

Personal Learning Plan

PERSONAL LEARNING PLAN*

Students will commence the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE) studies in Year 10 by undertaking the Personal Learning Plan, a compulsory subject in the SACE.

The Personal Learning Plan will help students:

  • Identify and research career paths and options
  • Choose appropriate SACE subjects and courses based on plans for future work and study
  • Consider and access subjects and courses available in and beyond school
  • Review strengths and areas students need to work on, including literacy, numeracy and ICT skills
  • Identify goals and plans for improvement
  • Review and adjust plans to achieve goals.

 

The Personal Learning Plan will contribute 10 credits towards the required total of 200 credits in the SACE. As it is a compulsory subject in the SACE, students must achieve a C grade or better.

 CONTENT

The content includes:

  • The SACE Capabilities
  • Specific content.

 

The SACE capabilities are:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and Communication Technology
  • Critical and Creative Thinking
  • Personal and Social
  • Ethical Understanding
  • Intercultural Understanding.

 

Specific Content (suggested topics)

  • Learning Skills
  • Thinking Skills and Techniques
  • Planning and Decision-making Skills
  • Communication
  • Work Skills
  • Social Living and Responsibility
  • Personal Characteristics
  • Interpersonal and Relationship Skills

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based and moderated by the SACE board.

Teachers design a set of assessments that enable students to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and understanding they have developed to meet the learning requirements of the PLP. Teachers use performance standards to decide how well each student has demonstrated his or her learning.

Students provide evidence of their learning through a set of four to five assessments. These may be presented in an integrated format, such as a portfolio and discussion.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Physical Education and Specialist Football - Soccer

HEALTHY LIFESTYLES*

The Healthy Lifestyles unit of Physical and Health Education is a compulsory curriculum for one semester for all Year 10 students at Le Fevre High School. Students will continue to build on their leisure and social knowledge, understanding of movement skills and take positive action to enhance their own and others’ health, safety and wellbeing. Students must complete a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Year 10, and they have the opportunity for further Physical Education experience by selecting an additional elective semester of Physical Education in Years 10.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. This course will provide students with opportunities to learn about and experience aspects of health and physical activity. The focus is on developing skills and improving performance in games and sports, fundamental movement challenges, tactical learning and spatial awareness as well as balancing a healthy lifestyle. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Healthy Lifestyle Improvement – Personal Choice
  • Water Safety – Canoe
  • Striking Sport – Table Tennis
  • Target Sports – Golf and Archery
  • Mental Health
  • Staying Safe: Partying and Drugs
  • Relationships and Sexual Health (Shine Program)

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

This unit of Physical Education is an elective choice for one semester for any Year 10 student wishing to extend their learning through a second unit of Physical Education at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to further extend the range of sports and activities that students have covered in the compulsory course and will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in Physical Education in Year 11 and Year 12. Students will still be required to complete a semester of compulsory Health and Physical Education in Year 10 in addition to this elective subject.

CONTENT

MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. The Physical Education elective course will build on knowledge from compulsory Healthy Lifestyle and develop understanding of human movement including:

  • Energy Systems
  • Fitness Components
  • Inclusive Sports
  • Group Dynamics
  • Flag football
  • Individual Sporting Pursuits

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the MYP assessment criteria and levels of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Planning for Performance
  • Applying and Performing
  • Reflecting and Improving

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher, they will be required to change back into their school uniform at the conclusion of the lesson.

Course
Semester Elective

SPECIALIST FOOTBALL - SOCCER

This unit of Physical and Health Education is an elective unit for one semester for any Year 9 students wishing to choose to select a second unit of Physical Education with a specialist element of Football at Le Fevre High School. The course is designed specifically to extend student’s knowledge and understanding of movement skills with relation to Football, which will provide the foundations of learning to be successful in the Football program in Year 11. The Specialist Football program is designed to be taken as a part of a two year program (Year 10 and Year 11). Students who successfully complete the two year program are awarded with 20 Stage 1 SACE credits.

CONTENT

The Specialist Football Program offers high performance pathway for committed student athletes with a passion for soccer to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in all aspects of football. Students within the program are given the opportunity to receive specialist skills coaching, fitness development and access to high quality training facilities. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Skill and performance development
  • Exercise physiology
  • Coaching course
  • Sideline First Aid and Taping Course
  • Nutrition
  • Goal setting
  • Motivation and Imagery
  • Biomechanics

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria based on the learning requirements for Integrated Learning and the performance standards describing their level of achievement and 10 Stage 1 SACE credits are awarded in each year. Students are assessed on the following:

Skills and Application Tasks:

  • Skill checklists
  • Performance presentation
  • Sports psychology

 

Group Project Tasks:

  • Coaching
  • Performance analysis

 

Analysis Tasks:

  • Exercise physiology
  • Technique analysis

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into their Football uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their teacher. There is a $100 (plus GST) course fee for Football in Year 10 and Year 11 to allow students to complete a Sports Taping course and participate in local competitions.

Course
Semester Elective

Science

SCIENCE*

In Year 10 Science, students analyse how the periodic table organises elements and use it to make predictions about the properties of elements. They explain how chemical reactions are used to produce products and how different factors influence the rate of reactions. They explain the concept of energy conservation and represent energy transfer and transformation within systems. They apply relationships between force, mass and acceleration to predict changes in the motion of objects. Students describe and analyse interactions and cycles within and between Earth’s spheres. They evaluate the evidence for scientific theories that explain the origin of the universe and the diversity of life on Earth. They explain the processes that underpin heredity and evolution. Students analyse how the models and theories they use have developed over time and discuss the factors that prompted their review.

Students develop questions and hypotheses and independently design and improve appropriate methods of investigation, including field work and laboratory experimentation. They explain how they have considered reliability, safety, fairness and ethical actions in their methods and identify where digital technologies can be used to enhance the quality of data. When analysing data, selecting evidence and developing and justifying conclusions, they identify alternative explanations for findings and explain any sources of uncertainty. Students evaluate the validity and reliability of claims made in secondary sources with reference to currently held scientific views, the quality of the methodology and the evidence cited. They construct evidence-based arguments and select appropriate representations and text types to communicate science ideas for specific purposes.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Year 10 Science:

  • Chemistry and the Periodic Table
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Genetics and DNA
  • Evolution
  • Energy Transfers
  • Road Science
  • The Universe

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed through a range of tests, assignments and practical reports.

In the Physics unit, practical activities may include measuring the speed and acceleration of moving objects and the relationship between mass and acceleration. Assignments include interpreting distance/time and speed/time graphs; using appropriate formulas to calculate displacement, velocity, and acceleration; and investigating the application of Newton’s Laws of Motion to the woomera (an Aboriginal spear-throwing device).

In the Chemistry unit, practical activities include testing the conductivity and reactivity of various metals. Assignments involve investigating how the Periodic Table has changed over time as new elements and knowledge has come to light, and how industrial chemicals are made.

In the Biology unit, students investigate the structure of DNA relating to the concept of inheritance, mendelian genetics, variation and frequency of traits, mutations and modern biotechnologies. Students then apply their knowledge of the Genetics topic to the topic of Evolution and further explore theories of evolution, adaptations, natural selection, human impact and intervention.

In the Earth Sciences unit, students investigate interactions between the lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere and how humans can affect these cycles. They research how knowledge of the universe has changed over time and the effects of global warming. They discuss whether the universe will continue to expand forever.

 

Students are assessed against the IB MYP Science assessment criteria:

Criteria A: Knowledge and Understanding

Criteria B: Inquiring and Designing

Criteria C: Processing and Evaluating

Criteria D: Reflection on the Impact of Science

 

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Course
Full Year
Compulsory
Yes
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Subject

Arts: Creative Arts

CREATIVE ARTS

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: Open to all students but it is recommended that students have undertaken Year 10 Design, Digital Media or have an interest in Media Arts.

CONTENT: In Creative Arts students acquire an understanding how to produce arts products using digital media and technology. Students develop skills in communication and investigation of contemporary practitioners and media styles while applying a personal aesthetic. Students use the Creative Arts process to produce completely original pieces of digital art work and media products.

Topics covered in this course may include:

  • Manipulating and creating images in Adobe Photoshop
  • Manipulating and creating moving image and digital content in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.

 

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed against the Creative Arts SACE performance standards.

Practical assessment: 60%

Completed student practical works

Folio Assessment: 40%

  • Skill acquisition assignment
  • Research and analysis task on media arts careers and pathways.

 

Creative Arts Visual presentation

 

Course
Semester Elective

VISUAL DESIGN AND CREATIVE ARTS B

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: This is a second semester option for Visual Art Design students and Creative Arts, Media students. It is expected that students have undertaken Visual Art Design or Creative Arts Media in semester 1.

CONTENT: In this course students will build on skills, knowledge and understanding to produce Media Arts and Design Products/solutions leading to Stage 2 Design or Creative Arts. Students develop skills in communication and investigation of contemporary practitioners and media styles while applying a personal aesthetic to create digital solutions, arts products and advertising. Students use the creative process to produce completely original pieces of digital art, visual design and media products.

Topics covered in this course may include:

  • Manipulating and creating images and designs in Adobe Photoshop
  • Manipulating and creating moving image and digital content in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.
  • Using the design process

 

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed against the Creative Arts SACE performance standards.

Practical assessment: 60%

Completed student practical works

Folio Assessment: 40%

  • Skill acquisition assignment
  • Research and analysis task on contemporary practitioners, media arts careers and pathways.

 

Course
Semester Elective

Arts: Dance

DANCE

In Stage 1 Dance students develop aesthetic and kinesthetic intelligence, using the body as an instrument for the expression and communication of ideas. Through the development of practical movement skills and choreographic and performance skills as an artist and experiencing performance as part of an audience, students explore and celebrate the human condition. They develop an appreciation of dance as an art form as well as a life enrichment opportunity connected to mental and physical wellbeing.

Dance prepares young people for participation in the 21st century by equipping them with transferrable skills, including critical and creative thinking skills, personal and social skills and intercultural understanding. Dance develops individuals who are reflective thinkers who can pose and solve problems and work both independently and collaboratively. The study of Stage 1 Dance establishes a basis for continuing to study Stage 2 Dance and for further education and employment across many fields, including the art and culture industries. It also provides opportunities to develop and pursue lifelong social and recreational activities.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA (3 STRANDS)

In this subject, students are expected to:

  • develop knowledge and understanding of the body, dance skills, dance elements, structural devices, production elements, and safe dance practice (Understanding dance)
  • apply technical and expressive dance skills in performance (Creating Dance)
  • communicate choreographic intent to an audience through composition & performance (Creating dance)
  • reflect on their own creative works as an artist and that of others as an audience (Responding to dance)
  • investigate dance in global contexts (Responding to dance).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dance presentation

Course
Semester Elective

Arts: Drama - Performing Arts

DRAMA - PERFORMING ARTS

In Drama, students engage in learning as authentic dramatic artists. Drama is active and participatory, involving the process of imagining, developing and creating original narratives, viewpoints and artistic products. Previous experience in Drama is preferable but not essential.

The following three areas of dramatic study are undertaken:

Assessment Type 1: Responding to Drama (30 %) Students attend a range of professional theatre experiences at the Adelaide Fringe, Adelaide Festival, State Theatre. They analyse, and reflect on the ideas, techniques, skills, choices, and artistic impact of a professional theatre on them as the audience and on their own individual development as an actor, designer or director.

Assessment Type 2: Company and Performance (40%) This is the performance component of the course and it involves working collaboratively to either devise creative works or develop performance work from established scripts. In creating a dramatic product, you will develop the skills and understandings to realise yourself as authentic artists – in on stage (actor) or off stage (director or designer) roles.

Assessment Type 3: Creative Synthesis; Drama and Technology (30%) Students choose to be either the director or designer of a hypothetical production and explore and experiment with possibilities for how they would use new technologies in their production.

 

 

Drama presentation

Course
Full Year

Arts: Music

MUSIC - MUSIC EXPERIENCE

This Music Experience program is designed for students with emerging musical skills. It provides opportunities for students to develop their musical understanding and skills in creating and responding to music.

Students explore and develop their practical music making skills through performance as a soloist or in an ensemble and are therefore required to continue or resume instrumental or vocal lessons. This course enables students to develop as practising musicians, and to develop in other areas of music in which they have a particular interest.

 Assessment

  • Arrangement/Composition Task
  • Performance Task
  • Responding to Musical Works Task
  • Music Performance Critique

 

Advice to students: It is highly advisable that students have completed music in Year 10 and that students have their own instrument so they can practice at home. Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

 

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Music presentation

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Arts: Visual Arts - Art

VISUAL ARTS - ART

This course focuses on developing the student’s skills in a range of methods and materials. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and analyse works of Australian and International practitioners both past and present and use this as a foundation for their own major work. There is an emphasis on visual thinking and how students communicate their ideas, thought processes and responses throughout their learning.

This subject includes 3 areas of study:

  • Visual Thinking, developing the ability to view, understand, analyse and record ideas and thoughts.
  • Practical Resolution, students resolve, create, make and present finished art works.
  • Visual Art in Context, students learn to understand the historical, cultural and social circumstances which produce art in a community.

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at stage 1 is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Assessment type 1: Folio
  • Assessment type 2: Practical
  • Assessment type 3: Visual Study

 

Visual Art presentation

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Arts: Visual Arts Design

VISUAL ART- DESIGN

Specialise in Graphic Design, Digital Photography and the Digital Media Industry. Completion of Year 10 Design and Digital Media is recommended.

CONTENT

Students work as Designers. Students use software (Photoshop) to complete two major practical designs. They study photography and incorporate their work into a graphic design product. They use the Design Process and record all developmental work in folios. Students study the Digital Media Industry, including researching roles, jobs, and training.

Students gain an understanding of the Digital Media Industry by working with industry mentors.

ASSESSMENT

Practical Folios, assignments and homework tasks, practical demonstration of skills, self-assessment.

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Visual Art- Design presentation

Course
Semester Elective

VISUAL DESIGN AND CREATIVE ARTS B

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: This is a second semester option for Visual Art Design students and Creative Arts, Media students. It is expected that students have undertaken Visual Art Design or Creative Arts Media in semester 1.

CONTENT: In this course students will build on skills, knowledge and understanding to produce Media Arts and Design Products/solutions leading to Stage 2 Design or Creative Arts. Students develop skills in communication and investigation of contemporary practitioners and media styles while applying a personal aesthetic to create digital solutions, arts products and advertising. Students use the creative process to produce completely original pieces of digital art, visual design and media products.

Topics covered in this course may include:

  • Manipulating and creating images and designs in Adobe Photoshop
  • Manipulating and creating moving image and digital content in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.
  • Using the design process

 

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed against the Creative Arts SACE performance standards.

Practical assessment: 60%

Completed student practical works

Folio Assessment: 40%

  • Skill acquisition assignment
  • Research and analysis task on contemporary practitioners, media arts careers and pathways.

 

Course
Semester Elective

Design & Technology: Business Innovation

Business Innovation

In Stage 1 Business Innovation, students begin to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings to engage in business contexts in the modern world.

In a time when design-led companies outperform other companies, students are immersed in the process of finding and solving customer problems or needs through design thinking and using assumption-based planning tools. Students consider the opportunities and challenges associated with start-up and existing businesses in the modern, connected world. They consider how digital and emerging technologies may present opportunities to enhance business models and analyse the responsibilities and impacts of proposed business models on global and local communities.

This subject would suit students who are interested in starting their own small business.

Learning requirements:

In this subject, students are expected to:

  • explore problems and generate possible solutions to meet customer problems or needs using a customer-focused approach
  • develop and apply financial awareness and decision-making skills using assumption based planning tools
  • respond to and apply business and financial information to develop and communicate business models
  • analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of business models
  • explore and analyse opportunities presented by digital and emerging technologies in business contexts
  • apply communication and collaborative skills in business contexts.

 

For a semester course, each assessment type should have a weighting of at least 20%.

  • Assessment Type 1: Business Skills – Three business skills tasks, one of which is a business model summary.
  • Assessment Type 2: Business Pitch– One business pitch.

 

Business Innovation Presentation

Course
Semester Elective

Design & Technology: Digital Technology

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

Students investigate existing Information Technology Systems to discover their operations, purpose & components. Students create practical, innovative solutions to problems of interest. By extracting, interpreting, and modelling real-world data sets, students identify trends to examine sustainable solutions to problems in, for example, business, industry, the environment and the community. They investigate how potential solutions are influenced by current and projected social, economic, environmental, scientific, and ethical considerations, including relevance, originality, appropriateness, and sustainability.

The learning requirements summarise the knowledge, skills, and understanding that students are expected to develop and demonstrate through their learning in Stage 1 Digital Technologies.

In this subject, students are expected to:

1. apply computational thinking skills to explore problems and possible solutions

2. develop and apply programming skills in creating digital solutions

3. analyse patterns and relationships in data sets and/or algorithms, and draw conclusions

4. develop and apply programdesign skills to create and evaluate digital solutions

5. research and discuss ethical considerations in digital technologies

6. work individually and collaboratively.

SACE ASSESSMENT

Assessment Type 1: Project Skills

Assessment Type 2: Digital Solution

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Design & Technology: Food & Hospitality

FOOD AND HOSPITALITY

In Food and Hospitality, students focus on the dynamic nature of the food and hospitality industry. They develop an understanding of contemporary approaches and issues related to food and hospitality. Students work independently and collaboratively to achieve common goals. They develop skills and safe work practices in the preparation, storage and handling of food, complying with current health and safety legislation. Students investigate and debate contemporary food and hospitality issues and current management practices.
Students examine the factors that influence people’s food choices and the health implications of these choices. They understand the diverse purposes of the hospitality industry in meeting the needs of local people and visitors.

CONTENT
Students study topics within one or more of the following five areas of study:
• Food, the Individual and the Family
• Local and Global Issues in Food and Hospitality
• Trends in Food and Culture
• Food and Safety
• Food and Hospitality Industry

ASSESSMENT
Assessment of Stage 1 is school based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:
• Practical Activity
• Group Activity
• Investigation

For more information, please click link below:

LFHS Food and Hospitality subject presentation 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

Design & Technology: Material Solutions

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY - TIMBER FOCUS

Students use of a diverse range of manufacturing technologies such as tools, machines, and/or systems to create a product using appropriate materials. Students produce outcomes that demonstrate the knowledge and skills associated with using systems, processes, and materials such as metals, plastics, wood, composites, ceramics and textiles.

Learning requirements: In this subject, students engage in the design and realisation process and are expected to:

  1. review design features, processes, materials, and production techniques and apply creative thinking to the design of a solution
  2. plan and develop design concepts, and communicate potential features of — and solutions
    to — a problem or challenge
  3. apply knowledge and understanding of skills, engineering procedures, and techniques, using technology to realise the solution
  4. evaluate processes used in design development and solution realisation

research and discuss ethical, legal, economic, and/or sustainability issues related to technology, materials selected, processes used, and/or solution design

 

Material Solutions Presentation

Course
Semester Elective

Design, Technology and Engineering - Material Solutions

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY - METAL FOCUS

Students use of a diverse range of manufacturing technologies such as tools, machines, and/or systems to create a product using appropriate materials. Students produce outcomes that demonstrate the knowledge and skills associated with using systems, processes, and materials such as metals, plastics, wood, composites, ceramics and textiles.

Learning requirements: In this subject, students engage in the design and realisation process and are expected to:

  1. review design features, processes, materials, and production techniques and apply creative thinking to the design of a solution
  2. plan and develop design concepts, and communicate potential features of — and solutions
    to — a problem or challenge
  3. apply knowledge and understanding of skills, engineering procedures, and techniques, using technology to realise the solution
  4. evaluate processes used in design development and solution realisation
  5. research and discuss ethical, legal, economic, and/or sustainability issues related to technology, materials selected, processes used, and/or solution design.

 

Material Solutions Presentation

English (Compulsory): English

ENGLISH*

Stage 1 English is a compulsory subject and students must complete 20 credits or 2 semesters of either Stage 1 English or Stage 1 Essential English. Students who complete 20 credits of either of these subjects at C grade level will meet the Literacy requirements of the SACE. Stage 1 English will focus on all the basic English skills around responding to texts and creating texts. Each semester will also have a special intertextual study that will build students skills in comparing texts. Students critically and creatively engage with a variety of text types including novels, film, media, poetry and drama texts.

Stage 1 English can lead to continued study in any of the Stage 2 English subjects; English Literary Studies, English or Essential English.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

English (Compulsory): Essential English

ESSENTIAL ENGLISH*

Essential English is an option for students to complete their literacy requirement as an alternative to English. This subject should not be chosen without consultation with a students Year 10 English Teacher and the English Coordinator as it will only lead to the Stage 2 Essential English course and not the other Stage 2 English classes.

This subject is designed for:

  • Students who are seeking to meet the SACE literacy requirements but are struggling with mainstream English
  • An English language development focus for students who are new arrivals in Australia
  • Students who are planning to pursue a career in a range of trades or vocational pathways. There is an emphasis on practical communication, comprehension, analysis and text creation.

 

 ASSESSMENT

Assessment will be according to the new SACE subject outline and aligned with the Australian Curriculum.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Health & PE: Child Studies

CHILD STUDIES

 

Child Studies is a SACE subject offered at Le Fevre High School at Stage 1 for full year. Within this course there are opportunities to develop a range of employability skills related to the care and development of children and it is highly linked to careers in Early Childhood.

The course focuses on children and their development from conception to 8 years of age and incorporates practical and theoretical activities, working individually and in groups. Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of young children through individual, collaborative, and practical learning.

They explore concepts such as the development, needs, and rights of children, the value of play, concepts of childhood and families, and the roles of parents and care-givers. Students have opportunities to build their understanding of the range of attitudes, values, and beliefs of people in the wider community in relation to children and child-rearing practices. They also consider the importance of behaviour management, child nutrition, and the health and well-being of children.

In a semester course, students provide evidence of their learning through 4 assessment tasks, which can be either a Practical Activity, Group Activity or Investigation.

  • Assessment Type 1: Practical Activity (50%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Group Activity (30%)
  • Assessment Type 3: Investigation (20%)

 

This course leads into Year 12 study of Stage 2 Child Studies (20 credits).

For more information, please click link below:

 

Child Studies Presentation

Health & PE: Health and Wellbeing

HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Having good health and wellbeing is crucial to quality of life and is a fundamental human right. Even though it is one of the most talked about topics, and is currently trending worldwide, our Health is too often not treated as a priority. Students develop the knowledge, skills and understandings required to explore and understand influences and make decisions regarding health and wellbeing. They consider the role of health and wellbeing in different contexts and explore ways of promoting positive outcomes for individuals, communities and global society.

Students learn strategies to improve their own mental/physical/emotional wellbeing and the community around them (practical and theory lessons). This course leads into Year 12 study of Stage 2 Health and Wellbeing (20 credits).

Health and Wellbeing covers four main concepts, and there are two types of assessments that students undertake, which include:

  • Practical Action (70%)
  • Issue Inquiry (30%)

 

Examples of practical activities could involve students developing exercise programs, exploring mental health benefits of meditation, and creating domestic violence action plans. Examples of the issue inquiry topics include homelessness, obesity, illicit drugs, racism, body image, addiction, and mental health.

There are many areas of interest that Health and Wellbeing explores, and possible career pathways from this course could lead to health services, research, psychology, teaching or sport science.

For more information, please click link below:

LFHS Health & Wellbeing subject presentation 2020

Health & PE: Outdoor Education

OUTDOOR EDUCATION

Year 11 Outdoor Education

This subject is offered in addition to the Physical Education (elective semester option), Outdoor Education gives students the opportunity to extend their learning outside of the classroom by engaging in a range of learning experiences that challenge them.

Content

The Stage 1 Outdoor Education program is designed to provide you with both individual and group responsibility and resilience in the outdoor setting.  The aims of the course are to develop group dynamics, teamwork, communication, leadership skills and to develop necessary knowledge and understanding around planning adventurous journeys.

The course is offered in two semesters, but students can elect to do full year course or select the semester that best suits their interest.

Semester 1 – Bushwalking focus with an aquatics excursion

Semester 2 – Aquatics Focus with Bushwalking excursion

It is recommended that students have already completed the Year 10 Outdoor Education course before doing Year 11 but is not mandatory to go into this course.

Assessment

  • Focus Area 1 – Environment and conservation
  • Focus Area 2 – Planning and management
  • Focus Area 3 – Personal and social growth and development

 

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria on the following:

  • Assessment Task 1 – About Natural Environments – 1600 words. Students explore human interactions with natural environments and the balance between human use, potential risks, and conservation and sustainability of the environment.
  • Assessment Task 2 – Experiences in Natural Environments – 1600 words. Students will understand the requirement of experiences in natural environments. Students plan and undertake outdoor activities as a group and develop team work and practical outdoor skills

 

Special Requirements

Please be mindful, while Le Fevre High School supports the Outdoor Education Program and allocates funding towards its administration, an additional fee of $200.00 is associated with student’s participation, which includes students fully accredited first aid course and camp fees.

Health & PE: Physical Education

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education can be studied as an elective at Stage 1. Physical Education can be taken as either a 1 semester course (10 credits) or for a full year (2 semesters at 10 credits each). Stage 1 aims to continue to build on knowledge, understanding and movement skills developed through years 8-10 and prepare students for further study at year 12 (Stage 2).

CONTENT

Through Physical Education, students explore the participation in and performance of human physical activities. It is an experiential subject in which students explore their physical capacities and investigate the factors that influence and improve participation and performance outcomes, which lead to greater movement confidence and competence. An integrated approach to learning in Physical Education supports an Arnoldian1 educational framework that promotes deep learning ‘in, through and about’ physical activity. Physical activities can include sports, theme-based games, fitness and recreational activities. Classes can undertake a learning and assessment program using a single focus approach (e.g. single sport) or can undertake multiple sports, games and/or activities. Topics that are undertaken include:

Focus Area 1: In movement

  • Skill Acquisition
  • Movement concepts and strategies
  • Energy Sources Affecting Performance
  • Effects of training on physical performance

 

Focus Area 2: Through movement

  • Barriers and enablers to participation
  • Social strategies to manipulate equity in participation
  • Personal influences.

 

Focus Area 3: About movement

  • The body’s response to physical activity
  • The effect of training on the body
  • Learning and refining skills

 

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria based on the learning requirements and performance standards describing their level of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

  • Assessment Type 1: Improvement Analysis
  • Assessment Type 2: Physical Activity Investigation

 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher.

For more information, please click link below:

LFHS Physical Education subject presentation 2020

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Humanities: Aboriginal Studies

ABORIGINAL STUDIES

In Aboriginal Studies, students learn from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice. Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities is integral to students developing and extending respectful ways of thinking, communicating, understanding, and acting. Through their learning in this subject, students draw on elements of history, sociology, politics, arts, and literature.

Students acknowledge and extend their understanding of the narratives and accomplishments as told by Aboriginal peoples and reflect on the impact of past events on the present. They develop respect for what narratives and accomplishments mean to different Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Students analyse the historical and contemporary experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and communities. They examine the intergenerational influence and impact of government policies, past and present, on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples and communities today. Students investigate experiences of ongoing resistance and survival and learn about initiatives and accomplishments developed in response to these experiences.

Diversity is at the heart of learning in Aboriginal Studies. Students develop their understanding of the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ identities and experiences, including cultural, political, linguistic, and contextual diversity. They acknowledge and extend their understanding of the diversity and the historical, social, and political importance of Aboriginal cultural expressions, and learn from a wide range of cultural expressions including painting, music, performance, literature, and oral traditions.

Students engage in learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities to develop respect for and awareness of the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities. They develop and extend their respect for, and understanding of cultural protocols, and reflect on the diversity of cultures. They develop respectful ways of thinking, listening, communicating, and acting.

In this subject, ‘Aboriginal peoples’ refers to all Indigenous peoples of Australia.

Students who complete Aboriginal Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Aboriginal Studies, Modern History, Legal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

ASSESSMENT

  • Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey   (3 Tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Creative Presentation. (1 Task)

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

Humanities: Ancient Studies

ANCIENT STUDIES

Students learn about the history, literature, society and culture of ancient civilisations, which may include Asia-Australia, the Americas, Europe and Western Asia, and the classical civilisations of Greece and Rome.

Students will consider the environmental, social, economic, religious, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of societies. They will also then look at their impact on history, the present day and the lessons that can be learnt from these ancient cultures.

This subject has one compulsory topic and five additional topics to choose from.

Compulsory topic

  • Topic 1: Understanding ancient history. 
    • In this topic students will learn about the practicalities of being an ancient historian and the processes and practices of examining the ancient past.

Additional topics

  • Topic 2: Art, architecture, and technology
  • Topic 3: Warfare and conquest
  • Topic 4: Social structures, slavery, and everyday life
  • Topic 5: Beliefs, rituals, and mythology
  • Topic 6: Creative representations.

 

Students who complete Ancient Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Modern History, Aboriginal Studies, Legal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

ASSESSMENT

  • Assessment Type 1: Skills and Applications (3 tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Inquiry (1 task)
Course
Semester Elective

Humanities: Gender Studies

GENDER STUDIES

Stage 1 Gender Studies offers a way of identifying and describing aspects of women’s lives, and critically assessing the institutions and ideas of societies and cultures from a gender perspective. The basic Women’s Studies concepts are gender and identity. These two concepts enable students to understand and analyse femininity and masculinity and the relationship between women’s identity and men’s identity. 

Gender identity is discussed as a broad and dynamic theme with both personal and political implications and can be understood as:

  • a personal and a group experience
  • constructed in social institutions
  • existing in a diversity of contexts
  • a citizenship issue.

This subject challenge the social and cultural constructions of femininity and masculinity that extend beyond biological capacity, and then move beyond these stereotypes to develop strategies for recognising women and women’s experiences as significant and as distinct from men’s experiences. You will also explore women’s historical and, in some contexts, continuing exclusion from the entitlements of citizenship, and the strategies, campaigns, and programs developed to promote inclusion.

 ASSESSMENT

  • at least one text analysis assessment
  • at least one group presentation
  • one issues analysis assessment.

 

Students who complete Gender Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Women’s Studies, Modern History, Legal Studies, Aboriginal Studies and Society & Culture.  

 

Course
Semester Elective

Humanities: Legal Studies

LEGAL STUDIES

Legal Studies explores Australia’s legal heritage and the dynamic nature of the Australian legal system within a global context. Students are provided with an understanding of the structures of the Australian legal system and how that system responds and contributes to social change while acknowledging tradition.

The study of Legal Studies provides insight into law-making and the processes of dispute resolution and the administration of justice. Students investigate legal perspectives on contemporary issues in society. They reflect on, and make informed judgments about, strengths and weaknesses of the Australian legal system. Students consider how, and to what degree, these weaknesses may be remedied.

CONTENT

  • Topic 1: Law and Society

Plus a minimum of two other topics from below:

  • Topic 1:    People, Structures and Processes
  • Topic 2:    Law-making
  • Topic 3:    Justice and Society
  • Topic 4:    Young People and the Law
  • Topic 5:    Victims and the Law
  • Topic 6:    Motorists and the Law
  • Topic 7:    Young Workers and the Law
  • Topic 8:    Relationships and the Law

Alternative topics can also be developed

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Folio
  • Issues Study
  • Presentation

 

Students who complete Legal Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Legal Studies, Modern History, Aboriginal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

 

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Course
Semester Elective

Humanities: Modern History

MODERN HISTORY

In the study of Modern History, at Stage1, students explore changes within the world since 1750, examining developments and movements of significance, the ideas that inspired them, and their short and long term consequences on societies, systems and individuals.

Students explore the impact that these developments and movements had on people’s ideas, perspectives, and circumstances. They investigate ways in which people, groups and institutions challenge structures, social organisations and economic models to transform societies.

Topics that could be covered [2 will be selected]

  • Imperialism
  • Decolonisation
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Social Movements
  • Revolution
  • Elective

 

ASSESSMENT

  • 3 Assignments tasks examining historical skills
  • 1 Independent Historical Study

 

Students who complete Modern History in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Modern History, Legal Studies, Aboriginal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

 

 

Course
Semester Elective

Humanities: Society and Culture

SOCIETY & CULTURE

This subject allows students to explore and analyse the interactions of people, societies, cultures, and environments. Using an interdisciplinary approach, they analyse the structures and systems of contemporary societies and cultures.

The course is always changing, as the world is always changing. In the past students have explored the following:

  • Youth Culture- film study, which looked at the changing nature of youth culture in Australia
  • Investigation of the Port River dolphins and management strategies surrounding them. Included an excursion to Garden Island and heard from a member of the Australasian Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC) Board
  • Group investigation of a global issue

 

Students will develop the following skills in this course:

  • Research
  • Exploring different perspectives
  • Report writing
  • Referencing
  • Conducting surveys and interviews

 

ASSESSMENT

  • at least one sources analysis assessment
  • at least one group activity
  • at least one investigation.

 

Students who complete Society & Culture in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Society & Culture, Modern History, Legal Studies, Aboriginal Studies and Women’s Studies.  

 

Course
Semester Elective

Indonesian

INDONESIAN

(The 10 credit option should not be selected without a discussion with the Language Coordinator) NB: re: eligibility. To ensure student success in this subject a passing grade in Yr. 10 Indonesian is required.

CONTENT

Stage 1 Indonesian consists of three themes each with a number of topics and sub-topics. Themes:

  • The Individual (eg sport and recreation, personal world)
  • The Indonesian-speaking Communities (eg visiting Indonesia, religion, gender)
  • The Changing World (eg environment, youth issues)

Through these themes, the students develop a deeper understanding and confidence in their knowledge and expression of Indonesian, preparing them well for Stage 2 and beyond.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Interaction (both written and oral interaction)
  • Text Production (both written and spoken pieces are produced)
  • Text Analysis (both written and oral texts are checked for comprehension)
  • Investigation (researching then presenting on a topic)

 

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Course
Full Year

Mathematics (Compulsory): Essential Mathematics

ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS*

Essential Mathematics is designed to support students who have Numeracy as an area for development. It focuses on the mathematics of daily life rather than in the context of work or further study. Students who study Essential Mathematics in Stage 1 are unable to study a Mathematics course in Stage 2. Students intending to study Stage 2 General Mathematics should undertake 20 credits of General Mathematics at Stage 1.

Recommended background: Students at IBMYP level 3 or lower in Year 10 Mathematics should consider Essential Mathematics.

A scientific calculator is required.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Essential Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Calculations, Time and Ratio
  • Earning and Spending
  • Geometry
Semester 2

  • Data in Context
  • Measurement
  • Investing

 

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Mathematical Folios (investigations and research tasks)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (topic tests)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Essential Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Osmosis practical report (IF)
  • Cells and Microorganisms topic test (SAT)
  • Keystone Species essay (IF)
  • Ecosystems and Biodiversity topic test (SAT)
Semester 2

  • Disease Spread and Prevention essay (IF)
  • Infectious Disease topic test (SAT)
  • Enzymes practical report (IF)
  • Multicellular Organism topic test (SAT)

 

Stage 1 Essential Mathematics is assessed using two criteria:

Concepts and Techniques

  • This criterion assesses students knowledge and understanding of mathematical information and knowledge, their application of mathematical skills, gathering, representing and interpreting data and using technology to find solutions to practical problems.

 

Reasoning and Communication

  • This criterion assesses students ability to interpret mathematical results, their reasoning when drawing conclusions and ability to consider appropriateness of their solutions, correct use of mathematics notation, representations and information, and their communication of ideas and information.

 

SACE requires all students to achieve a C grade or higher in one semester of any Mathematics course in Stage 1. Students who are successful have the option to choose to select an alternative elective in semester 2 or continue with a second semester of Mathematics. Students who are not successful must study a second semester of Mathematics.

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Mathematics (Compulsory): General Mathematics

GENERAL MATHEMATICS*

General Mathematics is designed for students to develop a broad range of quantitative skills to support them in fields such as business, commerce or the trades. The course introduces students to a personal financial management, the statistical investigation process, and modelling of the real world using lines, networks and matrices.

Recommended background: Students at IBMYP level 4 or higher in Year 10 Mathematics should consider General Mathematics.

A scientific calculator is required.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 General Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Investing and Borrowing
  • Measurement
  • Statistical Investigation
Semester 2

  • Applications of Trigonometry
  • Linear and Exponential Functions
  • Matrices and Networks

 

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Mathematical Folios (investigations and research tasks)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 General Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Measurement topic test (SAT)
  • Investing and Borrowing topic test (SAT)
  • Bank Interest investigation (IF)
  • Statistical investigation (IF)

 

Semester 2

  • Applications of Trigonometry topic test (SAT)
  • Matrices and Network topic test (SAT)
  • Networks investigation (IF)
  • Linear and Exponential Functions topic test (SAT)

Stage 1 General Mathematics is assessed using two criteria:

Concepts and Techniques

    • This criterion assesses students knowledge and understanding of mathematical information and knowledge, their application of mathematical skills, gathering, representing and interpreting data and using technology to find solutions to practical problems.

 

Reasoning and Communication

    • This criterion assesses students ability to interpret mathematical results, their reasoning when drawing conclusions and ability to consider appropriateness of their solutions, correct use of mathematics notation, representations and information, and their communication of ideas and information.

 

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 General Mathematical

Students who intend to study General Mathematics at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods.

SACE requires all students to achieve a C grade or higher in one semester of any Mathematics course in Stage 1. Students who are successful have the option to choose to select an alternative elective in semester 2 or continue with a second semester of Mathematics. Students who are not successful must study a second semester of Mathematics.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Mathematics (Compulsory): Mathematical Methods

MATHEMATICAL METHODS*

Mathematical Methods provides the necessary background for students wishing study tertiary courses with significant mathematical content like Aviation, Architecture, Engineering or the Physical Sciences. Mathematical Methods is the prerequisite subject for all tertiary Engineering courses and many other scientific fields of study (in conjunction with Specialist Mathematics in some cases).

Recommended background: Students at IBMYP level 6 or higher in Year 10 Mathematics or with a future career that requires high level mathematical knowledge should consider Mathematical Methods. A student considering Specialist Mathematics must also study Mathematical Methods.

A Graphics Calculator (ideally CASIO 9860 series) is required. These are available for loan through the school.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Mathematical Methods.

Semester 1

  • Functions and Graphs
  • Polynomials and Quadratics
  • Trigonometry
Semester 2

  • Counting and Statistics
  • Growth and Decay
  • Introduction to Differential Calculus

 

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school- based and subject to moderation.

There are two assessment types:

  • Mathematical Folios (investigations and research tasks)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 General Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Functions and Graphs topic test (SAT)
  • Polynomials topic test (SAT)
  • Polynomials investigation (IF)
  • Trigonometry topic test (SAT)
Semester 2

  • Counting and Statistics topic test (SAT)
  • Growth and Decay topic test (SAT)
  • Introduction to Calculus topic test (SAT)
  • Modelling With Derivatives investigation (IF)

 

Stage 1 Mathematical Methods is assessed using two criteria:

Concepts and Techniques

    • This criterion assesses students knowledge and understanding of mathematical information and knowledge, their application of mathematical skills, gathering, representing and interpreting data and using technology to find solutions to practical problems.

 

Reasoning and Communication

    • This criterion assesses students ability to interpret mathematical results, their reasoning when drawing conclusions and ability to consider appropriateness of their solutions, correct use of mathematics notation, representations and information, and their communication of ideas and information.

 

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Mathematical Methods or Stage 2 General Mathematics

Students who intend to study Mathematics Methods at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods. Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Mathematical Methods as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

SACE requires all students to achieve a C grade or higher in one semester of any Mathematics course in Stage 1. Students who are successful have the option to choose to select an alternative elective in semester 2 or continue with a second semester of Mathematics. Students who are not successful must study a second semester of Mathematics.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Research Project (Compulsory)

RESEARCH PROJECT*

The Research Project is a compulsory subject of the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE). This is a Stage 2 subject, studied in Year 11 at Le Fevre High School. The term ‘research’ is used broadly and may include practical or technical investigations, formal research, or exploratory enquiries. Students choose a topic of interest – it may be linked to a SACE subject or course, or to a workplace or community context. It could be an idea or issue, a technical or practical challenge, an artefact, a problem, or a research question. They work independently and with others to initiate an idea, and to plan and manage a research project. Students learn and apply research processes and the knowledge and skills specific to their research topic. They analyse information and explore ideas to develop their research and record, communicate and evaluate their research outcome. Students will be enrolled in Research Project A or B after consultation with the learning area coordinator.

CONTENT

Capabilities:In their Research Project students must demonstrate one or more capability relevant to their research from the following list: Literacy, Numeracy, ICT capability, creative and critical thinking, personal and social capability, ethical understanding and intercultural understanding. They show how this capability is developed through their research.

Research framework: Students follow the research framework below as a guide in completing the work.

  • Initiating, planning, and managing the research
  • Carrying out the research
  • Communicating the research outcome
  • Evaluating the research.

 

ASSESSMENT

School-based assessment:                                     

  • Folio (preliminary ideas and research proposal, research development, discussion) 30%
  • Research outcome 40%

 

External assessment:

  • Evaluation (including written summary) 30%

 

Course
Semester Elective
Compulsory
Yes

Science: Biology

BIOLOGY

The study of Biology is constructed around inquiry into and application of understanding the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments. By investigating biological systems and their interactions, from the perspectives of energy, control, structure and function, change, and exchange in microscopic cellular structures and processes through to macroscopic ecosystem dynamics, students extend the skills, knowledge, and understanding that enable them to explore and explain everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues, and understand how biological science impacts on their lives, society, and the environment. They apply their understanding of the interconnectedness of biological systems to evaluate the impact of human activity on the natural world.

Recommended background: IBMYP level 5 or higher in the Year 10 Science biological science units.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Biology:

Semester 1

  • Cells and Microorganisms
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics
Semester 2

  • Infectious Disease
  • Multicellular Organisms

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Investigations Folios (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Biology.

Semester 1

  • Osmosis practical report (IF)
  • Cells and Microorganisms topic test (SAT)
  • Keystone Species SHE investigation (IF)
  • Ecosystems and Biodiversity topic test (SAT)
Semester 2

  • Disease Spread and Prevention SHE investigation (IF)
  • Infectious Disease topic test (SAT)
  • Enzymes practical report (IF)
  • Multicellular Organism topic test (SAT)

 

Stage 1 Biology is assessed using two criteria:

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

    • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.

 

Knowledge and Understanding

    • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall Biological information, to use Biological terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

 

Successful completion of this subject leads to Stage 2 Biology

 Students who intend to study Biology at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Biology. Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Biology as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

 

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Science: Chemistry

CHEMISTRY

In their study of Chemistry, students develop and extend their understanding of how the physical world is chemically constructed, the interaction between human activities and the environment, and the use that human beings make of the planet’s resources. They explore examples of how scientific understanding is dynamic and develops with new evidence, which may involve the application of new technologies. Students consider examples of benefits and risks of chemical knowledge to the wider community, along with the capacity of chemical knowledge to inform public debate on social and environmental issues. The study of Chemistry helps students to make informed decisions about interacting with and modifying nature, and explore options such as green or sustainable chemistry, which seeks to reduce the environmental impact of chemical products and processes.

Recommended background: IBMYP level 5 or higher in the Year 10 Science chemical science units.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Chemistry.

  • Materials and their Atoms
  • Combinations of Atoms
  • Acid and Bases
  • Molecules
  • Mixtures and Solutions
  • Redox Reactions

 

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Investigations Folios (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Chemistry.

Semester 1

  • Osmosis practical report (IF)
  • Cells and Microorganisms topic test (SAT)
  • Keystone Species essay (IF)
  • Ecosystems and Biodiversity topic test (SAT)

 

Semester 2

  • Disease Spread and Prevention essay (IF)
  • Infectious Disease topic test (SAT)
  • Enzymes practical report (IF)
  • Multicellular Organism topic test (SAT)

 

Stage 1 Chemistry is assessed using two criteria:

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

    • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.

 

Knowledge and Understanding

    • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall chemical information, to use chemical terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

 

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Chemistry

Students who intend to study Chemistry at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Chemistry. Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Chemistry as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Science: Forensic Science

SCIENTIFIC STUDIES - FORENSIC SCIENCE

Scientific Studies develops students knowledge of scientific principles and concepts, the ability to use that knowledge to identify questions, issues, opportunities and challenges, and the capacity to acquire new knowledge through their own investigations. They develop the skills and abilities to explain scientific phenomena, and to draw evidence-based conclusions from the investigation of science-related issues. In this way, students develop scientific knowledge and skills to support them in their future career pathways, including those that are science-related, and everyday life in a world shaped by science and technology.

 Recommended background: IBMYP level 5 or higher in the Year 10 Science.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Forensic Science.

  • Introduction to Forensics
  • Physical Evidence
  • Hair and Fibres
  • Fingerprints
  • Blood and DNA
  • Blood Spatter

 

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Inquiry Folios (Science as a Human Endeavour investigation and Science Inquiry Skills tasks)
  • Collaborative Inquiry (Investigation Design and Evaluation)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in Forensic Science.

  • Analysis and evaluation of the forensic techniques used in a real life crime (IF)
  • Investigation on the forensic techniques used in television shows (IF)
  • Collaborative inquiry on fingerprinting techniques (CI)
  • A SHE investigation on a topic of the students choice (IF)

 

Stage 1 Scientific Studies- Forensic Science is assessed using two criteria:

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

    • This criterion assesses students’ ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.

 

Knowledge and Understanding

    • This criterion assesses students’ ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall scientific information, to use scientific terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

 

Students who intend to study Biology at Stage 2 may benefit from selecting this subject, though this is not compulsory.

Course
Semester Elective

Science: Naval Engineering - Integrated Learning

NAVAL ENGINEERING - INTEGRATED LEARNING

This hands-on STEM course (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) split in Semester 1 and Semester 2, is suitable for students who are interested in Applied Science, Engineering and Technology. In this course, Applied Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics are used to explore and explain current scientific issues in primarily a Maritime environment. Through these two Semesters, students become aware of the significance of Mathematics and Science to address a range of Engineering challenges. The Science and Mathematics studied also relate to many vocational pathways.

This course centres on personal and group research activities as well as practical exercises of design, construction and use of models to test theories, by using Mathematics, Science and CNC Laser cutting technology.

Although it is possible to choose only one semester, this choice will give students only 10 SACE credits/points. To get the full complement of 20 SACE Credits (10+10), and if students intend to choose Advanced Naval Engineering at a Stage 2 Level (year 12), it is highly recommended that students choose to do semester 1 and 2 (full year) at Stage 1 (year 11) level to get the full knowledge of the Curriculum in preparation for Advanced Naval Engineering at a Stage 2 level.

CONTENT ( 10 + 10 SACE credits )

Semester 1 ( 10 SACE Credits )

  • Density – Mass, Volume and applications of Density
  • Archimedes Principle applied to Submarines and Submersible structures
  • Displacement and waterlines
  • The STEM of Marine Propellers (Cavitation) and of Aviation propellers, Aircraft, Helicopters and Drones. Students will learn how to fly a helicopter (Huey) in a VR (Virtual Reality) environment by using DCS software and a VR headset.
  • STEM and Cultural Study of Boomerangs
  • Current Applications of Submarine Technology
  • Future designs for Deep Sea exploration

 

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to study Submarines, Buoyancy, Density, Strobe lights and Synchronicity, Rotational and Linear Speeds of Propellers, Boomerangs (students make their own), Rotors, Helicopters and Drones.

 ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Density, Archimedes Principle and Buoyancy in Submarines – STEM of propellers and Boomerangs, cavitation, helicopters and drones.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of submarine technology relating to the course and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Venture – Research: Students produce an essay about a chosen topic and are invited to reflect on their learning experience.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this course.

  • Practical Inquiries 40 %
  • Connections Task – Group Activity 30 %
  • Personal Venture 30 %

 

Semester 2 ( 10 SACE Credits )

  • Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic principles
  • Theory of lift and drag applied to wings and sails
  • Surface to mass ratio of aircraft and its influence on the gliding ratio of planes
  • Hydrodynamics principles applied to hydrofoil technology
  • Application to control surfaces found in submarines and aircrafts. Students will learn how to fly an F/A 18 Super Hornet fighter plane in a VR (Virtual Reality) environment by using DCS software and a VR headset.
  • Physics of sail boats: Hull Stability and Aerodynamics in sails
  • Past, Current and Future Techniques used to harness the wind to propel marine vessels
  • Aerodynamics and stability of land yachts applied to building a full-scale land yacht.

 

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to study the Physics of Sail boats, Aircraft and Wing physics, as well as  Foil riding powered and sailing vessels. Students will also have the opportunity to design and build gliders to test their knowledge of Aerodynamics as well as testing remote land-yacht models. Time permitting, student will also design and build a full-scale land-yacht and test it on the basketball court to illustrate sail navigation principles. In the process, they will study the Physics Principles of Forces, Pulleys and Winch technology.

ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Aerodynamic principles applied to glider design, Hydrodynamic principles applied to hydrofoil technology, wing surface to mass ratio relating to aircraft performance, Physics of Control Surfaces applied to VR F/A 18 flying, multiplication of forces and pulley technology. Land-yachts Technology.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of Sail/Aviation Technology and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Venture – Research:  Students produce an essay about a chosen topic relating to the course and are invited to reflect on their learning experience.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this course.

  • Practical Inquiries 40 %
  • Connections Task – Group Activity 30 %
  • Personal Venture 30 %

 

 

 

naval 2 naval naval 3

Naval Engineering 3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year

Science: Physics

PHYSICS

The study of Physics is constructed around using qualitative and quantitative models, laws, and theories to better understand matter, forces, energy, and the interaction among them. Physics seeks to explain natural phenomena, from the subatomic world to the macro cosmos, and to make predictions about them. The models, laws, and theories in physics are based on evidence obtained from observations, measurements, and active experimentation over thousands of years. In Physics, students integrate and apply a range of understanding, inquiry, and scientific thinking skills that encourage and inspire them to contribute their own solutions to current and future problems and challenges. Students also pursue scientific pathways, for example, in engineering, renewable energy generation, communications, materials innovation, transport and vehicle safety, medical science, scientific research, and the exploration of the universe.

Recommended background: IBMYP level 5 or higher in the Year 10 Science physical science units.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Physics:

Semester 1

  • Linear Motion and Forces
  • Electric Circuits
  • Heat

 

Semester 2

  • Energy and Momentum
  • Waves
  • Nuclear Models and Radioactivity

 

Assessment           

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Investigations Folio (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (topic tests)

 

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Physics.

Semester 1

  • Parachute design investigation (IF)
  • Linear Motion and Forces topic test (SAT)
  • Importance of Space Flight SHE investigation (IF)
  • Rocket Science presentation (SAT)

 

Semester 2

  • Disease Spread and Prevention essay (IF)
  • Infectious Disease topic test (SAT)
  • Enzymes practical report (IF)
  • Multicellular Organism topic test (SAT)

 

Stage 1 Physics is assessed using two criteria:

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

    • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.

 

Knowledge and Understanding

    • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall physics-related information, to use physics terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

 

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Physics

Students who intend to study Physics at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Physics. Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Physics as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

 

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

VET - Engineering Pathways Program

Certificate 2 Engineering Pathways

South Australia is the national centre of naval shipbuilding and submarine sustainment, and the confirmed location for Australia’s next generation Future Submarines and Future Frigates. This course aims to provide students with skills and competencies required in Engineering Trades that will be in high demand. Students will learn skills that are applicable to a range of engineering trades, as well as required theory. Oxy/Acetylene and MMA welding techniques are used. Projects, design work and testing are integral components of the course. Students will be supported by local industry partnerships for visits and workplace learning.

This course may lead to an Engineering Trades, Fabrication, Mechanical Fitter, Automotive, Diesel, Ship Building, Plumbing or Electrical Apprenticeship. It may also lead to Diploma or Advanced Diploma in Engineering or Bachelor Degree in Engineering. The maritime content will highlight the history of both the school and the region in providing a highly skilled workforce for the maritime and allied industries.

Students can then progress to studying a Certificate 3 Engineering as a part school based apprenticeship, gaining recognition towards their SACE. For more information on school based apprenticeships please visit https://www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/school-based-apprenticeships

VET - Hospitality Pathways Program

Certificate 2 Kitchen Operations

This qualification reflects the role of individuals working in kitchens who use a defined and limited range of food preparation and cookery skills to prepare food and menu items. They are involved in mainly routine and repetitive tasks and work under direct supervision. This qualification does not provide the skills required by commercial cooks, which are covered in SIT30816 Certificate III in Commercial Cookery.

This qualification provides a pathway to work in kitchen operations in organisations such as restaurants, hotels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops; and institutions such as aged care facilities, hospitals, prisons, and schools.

Possible job titles include:

  •          breakfast cook
  •          catering assistant
  •          fast food cook
  •          sandwich hand
  •          takeaway cook

 

Students can then progress to studying a Certificate 3 Kitchen Operations as a part of their year 12 studies and/or move into a school based apprenticeship. For more information on school based apprenticeships please visit https://www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/school-based-apprenticeships

VET- Maritime Pathways Program

Certificate 2 Maritime Industries

This is an entry level course that will provide students with maritime skills and knowledge to enable them to be immediately employable as Deck Hands as well as giving them significant credit in a Coxswain course. This will be able to be completed once students have gained sufficient documented time at sea.

This qualification will assist students to fast track their maritime career in either marine engineering or as a deck officer. The units of competency completed during this course will gain credit toward a Coxswain qualification. This can be completed when students reach the age of 18 and have spent sufficient time at sea.

Workplace Practices

WORKPLACE PRACTICES

Workplace Practices at Stage 1 allows learners to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of industry and work.  Students develop and apply relevant work skills, identify, and investigate processes and issues related to work, industry, and the workplace.  They may work independently or with others and review, reflect and report on their experiences, abilities, interests, and aspirations in relation to planning for work and future pathways.

Students who select to do a VET Flexible Industry Pathway course will automatically be enrolled in this course to support their vocational learning and identified career pathway.

Content

Workplace Practices is a 10‑credit subject at Stage 1. It has three areas of study:

Industry and Work Knowledge, Vocational learning and/or VET

Industry and Work Knowledge

Students develop knowledge and understanding of the nature, type, and structure of the workplace. Specific areas include the changing nature of work; industrial relations and legislation; safe and sustainable workplace practices; technical and industry-related skills; and issues in industry and workplace contexts.

For a 10‑credit subject, students undertake two or more topics.

Vocational Learning

Vocational learning is general learning that has a vocational perspective. It includes any formal learning in a work-related context outside Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) qualifications. Students undertake learning in the workplace to develop and reflect on their capabilities, interests, and aspirations and to reflect on the knowledge, skills, and attributes valued in the workplace.

Vocational Education and Training (VET)

VET includes any ‘training and assessment delivered by a registered training organisation which meets the requirements specified in national industry/enterprise Training Packages or in accredited courses’ (training.gov.au).

 

ASSESSMENT

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School-based Assessment

  • Folio 40%
  • Performance 40%
  • Reflection 20%

 

Course
Semester Elective
Print

Subject

Art: Drama - Performing Arts

DRAMA - PERFORMING ARTS

Drama is the art of enriching our understanding of human relationships, from the personal to the global. It engages others through the creation of original connections between presenters, audiences, ideas and narratives. Drama asks us to question – as individuals, societies and as a species – not only how and what we do, but also why we choose to think and do things the way we do. In asking these questions and creating dramatic ways of considering these ideas, Drama students develop their unique gifts as creative, informed, wise, productive and inter-personally skilled artists and collaborators.  This course involves a combination of practical and theory (although most theory can be presented in multi modal forms).

Note: Previous experience in Drama is preferable.

  • Group presentation: study of a dramatic innovator and practical application of knowledge via performance in roles such as actor, director, designer. 20%
  • Folio: review live theatre performances and group production report in which, students review and analyse their own involvement in a dramatic performance or presentation. 30%
  • Performance:(external assessment) students participate in a group production either as a performer or in an off stage design role (lighting design, sound design, set design, costume design, make – up design etc). This task requires some out of hours’ rehearsal commitment. 30%
  • Interpretative study: investigate and respond to a dramatic innovator such as Tim Burton or Baz Luhmann etc 20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drama Presentation

Course
Full Year

Arts: Creative Arts

Creative Arts

Students undertake a specialised study within or across one or more Arts disciplines.

Students actively participate in the development and presentation of Creative Arts products. These may take the form of, for example, musicals, plays, concerts, visual art, craft and design works, digital media, film and video, public arts projects, community performances, presentations and installations, and vocal groups or other ensembles.

  • Creative Arts is not precluded by students studying Visual Art and Visual Art Design in Stage 2.
  • In a nutshell, Creative Arts is about learning what practitioners do in their Arts practice. Then students master those skills to achieve polished creative products.
  • It’s driven by learning the craft of making/creating in a way reflective of current contemporary arts practice.
  • Students can work on collaborative Arts products.
  • The written work is very processed based. Students can be highly creative, conceptual and out the box but they don’t have to achieve the same level of synthesis and highly sophisticated understanding to be in the A band as with Visual Arts.
  • Leads directly to Creative Arts tertiary pathways.

 

ASSESSMENT

School Based Assessment (70%)

  • Assessment Type 1: Product (50%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Inquiry (20%)

 

External Assessment (30%)

  • Assessment Type 3: Practical Skills (30%)

Not precluded. For students who want a strong Arts pathway. Need to be good independent learners.

Creative Arts Presentation

Course
Full Year

Arts: Music - Music Explorations

MUSIC- MUSIC EXPLORATIONS

Students develop their critical and creative thinking, and their aesthetic appreciation of music, through exploring and responding to the music of others, and refining and presenting performances and/or compositions. These performances and/or compositions may include original works and/or presentations or arrangements of existing compositions.

Students experiment with, explore, and manipulate musical elements to learn the art of constructing and deconstructing music. They develop and extend their musical literacy and skills through understanding the structural and stylistic features and conventions of music, expressing their musical ideas, and reflecting on and critiquing their learning in music.

ASSESSMENT

  • three musical literacy tasks
  • one portfolio of explorations
  • one creative connections task.

 

Advice to students: It is highly advisable that students have completed music in Year 11 and that students have their own instrument so they can practice at home. Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

Music Presentation

Course
Full Year

Arts: Visual Arts - Art

VISUAL ARTS - ART

ASSUMED KNOWLEDGE: It is highly recommended that students have had prior experience in one or more Visual Art/ Design subjects.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students work as Artists, demonstrating their learning through individually chosen learning projects in any genre of Visual Art.

 LEARNING  REQUIREMENTS: In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. conceive, develop, and make work(s) of art or design that reflect individuality and the development and communication of a personal visual aesthetic
  2. demonstrate visual thinking through the development and evaluation of ideas and explorations in technical skills with media, materials, and technologies
  3. apply technical skills in using media, materials, technologies, and processes to solve problems and resolve work(s) of art or design
  4. communicate knowledge and understanding of their own works and the connections between their own and other practitioners’ works of art or design
  5. analyse, interpret, and respond to visual arts in cultural, social, and/or historical contexts
  6. develop inquiry skills to explore visual arts issues, ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and questions.

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at stage 2 is both school-based and external. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School based Assessment

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio 30%- a Folio documenting visual learning in support of two resolved final artworks.
  • Assessment Type 2: Practical 40%- two resolved Artworks along with two Practitioner’s Statements.

 

External Assessment                                             

  • Assessment Type 3: Visual Study 30%- an exploration of, and/or experimentation with, one or more styles, ideas, concepts, media, materials, methods, techniques, technologies, or processes.

Students base their exploration and/or experimentation on critical analysis of the work of other practitioners, individual research, and the development of visual thinking and/or technical skills.

They present the findings of their visual study as well as their conclusions, insights, and personal opinions about aesthetics.

Visual Art Presentation

 

Course
Full Year

Arts: Visual Arts - Design

VISUAL ARTS - DESIGN

ASSUMED KNOWLEDGE: It is highly recommended that students have had prior experience in one or more Design/ Visual Art subjects.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students work as Designers, demonstrating their learning through individually chosen learning projects from Design areas such as Graphic and Communication design, Product design and Environmental design.

 LEARNING  REQUIREMENTS: In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. conceive, develop, and make work(s) of art or design that reflect individuality and the development and communication of a personal visual aesthetic
  2. demonstrate visual thinking through the development and evaluation of ideas and explorations in technical skills with media, materials, and technologies
  3. apply technical skills in using media, materials, technologies, and processes to solve problems and resolve work(s) of art or design
  4. communicate knowledge and understanding of their own works and the connections between their own and other practitioners’ works of art or design
  5. analyse, interpret, and respond to visual arts in cultural, social, and/or historical contexts
  6. develop inquiry skills to explore visual arts issues, ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and questions.

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at stage 2 is both school-based and external. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based Assessment

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio 30%- a Folio documenting visual learning in support of two resolved final design works.
  • Assessment Type 2: Practical 40%- two resolved Design Works along with two Practitioner’s Statements.

 

External Assessment                                            

  • Assessment Type 3: Visual Study 30%- an exploration of, and/or experimentation with, one or more styles, ideas, concepts, media, materials, methods, techniques, technologies, or processes.

Students base their exploration and/or experimentation on critical analysis of the work of other practitioners, individual research, and the development of visual thinking and/or technical skills.

They present the findings of their visual study as well as their conclusions, insights, and personal opinions about aesthetics.

Design Presentation

Course
Full Year

Design & Technology: Food & Hospitality

FOOD AND HOSPITALITY

In the first semester this subject develops skills in selecting, planning and preparing food for catering events. Students gain an understanding of the processes used in a catering enterprise. The nature and scope of the Food and Hospitality Industry is explored, as is legislation and other factors that impact on the industry. In the second semester students develop an understanding of the processes used in a catering enterprise. Students examine the decision-making, interpersonal, management and group skills desired in the Food and Hospitality Industry. Students are involved in several catering functions. Assessment is based on assignments involving both theoretical and practical components.

ASSESSMENT

School based Assessment:

  • Practical activities (5)                                 50%
  • Group activities (1)                                     20%

 

External Assessment:

  • Independent Investigation                       30%

 

For more information, please click link below:

LFHS Food and Hospitality subject presentation 

food

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year

Design & Technology: Material Solutions

MATERIAL SOLUTIONS

This course is centred around the use of advanced manufacturing concepts, techniques and equipment.

Students will have access to a range of traditional and computer controlled machines, hand held power tools and equipment, 3D printers and a laser cutter to design and produce products. Utilising a broad range of materials students will use machines and manufacturing methods that reflect modern manufacturing processes in contemporary industries.

CONTENT

The course will develop skills in design, problem solving and teamwork with practical work including some traditional timber skilling and projects incorporating the use of contemporary and advanced manufacturing technologies and techniques.

ASSESSMENT

Practical skills in use of machines form a major component of the assessment.

  • Skills and Applications Tasks 20%
  • Product 50%
  • Folio (external assessment) 30%

 

Material Solutions Presentation

Course
Full Year

English: English

ENGLISH

In English students analyse the interrelationship of author, text and audience with an emphasis on how language and stylistic features shape ideas and perspectives in arrange of contexts. they consider social, cultural, economic, historical and/or political perspectives in texts and their representation of human experience and the world.

Students explore how the purpose of a text is achieved through application of text conventions and stylistic choices to position the reader to respond to ideas and perspectives. Students then create their own imaginative, interpretive, analytical and persuasive texts that may be written, oral and/or multimodal.

This course is designed to be a traditional English course with a significant amount of flexibility in text choice and assignment direction. Students who want a balance of text analysis and text creation should choose this subject.

Students who did Essential English in Stage 1 should not choose this subject and should instead look at Stage 2 Essential English if they wish to study English in year 12.

Note: Only one of the English offerings may be attempted as a standard Stage 2 load.

School Assessment 70%

  • Assessment type 1: Responding to text 30%
  • Assessment type 2: Creating texts and Writer’s Statement 40%

 

External Assessment

  • Assessment type 3: Comparative Analysis 30%

 

Course
Full Year

English: English Literary Studies

ENGLISH LITERARY STUDIES

Stage 2 English Literary Studies focuses on the skills and strategies of critical thinking needed to interpret texts. Through shared and individual study of texts, students encounter different opinions about texts, have opportunities to exchange and develop ideas, find evidence to support a personal view, learn to construct logical and convincing arguments, and consider a range of critical interpretations of texts.
English Literary Studies focuses on ways in which literary texts represent culture and identity, and on the dynamic relationship between authors, texts, audiences and contexts. Students develop an understanding of the power of language to represent ideas, events, and people in particular ways and of how texts challenge or support cultural perceptions.
By focusing on the creativity and craft of the authors, students develop strategies to enhance their own skills in creating texts and put into practice the techniques they have observed.
Note: Only one of the English offerings may be attempted as a standard Stage 2 load.

School Based Assessment
• Assessment type 1: Responding to texts 50%
• Assessment type 2: Creating texts 20%

External Assessment
• Assessment type 3: Text study 30%

The external assessment is divided into 2 sections, part A and part B.
• Part A: Comparative text study – Individual study submitted electronically 15%
• Part B: Critical reading – 90 minute exam 15%

 

Course
Full Year

Essential English

ESSENTIAL ENGLISH

Essential English is a 20-credit subject at Stage 2. In Essential English students respond to and create texts in and for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and/or workplace contexts.

Students understand and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.

Essential English is a 20-credit subject at Stage 2. In Essential English students respond to and create texts in and for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and/or workplace contexts.
Students understand and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.
The focus of Essential English is on the practical application of the English language and how language can be explored in real life contexts.
Students who completed Essential English in Stage 1 may choose this subject if they wish to continue with English in Stage 2. However, Students who did English in Stage 1 may also choose this subject as an option.
Note: Only one of the English offerings may be attempted as a standard Stage 2 load.

School assessment (70%)
• Assessment Type 1: Responding to Texts (30%)
• Assessment Type 2: Creating Texts (40%)

External assessment (30%)
• Assessment Type 3: Language Study (30%)

Students provide evidence of their learning through seven assessments, including the external assessment component. Students complete:
• three assessments for responding to texts
• three assessments for creating texts
• one language study.

Course
Full Year

Health & PE: Child Studies

CHILD STUDIES

Child Studies is a SACE subject currently offered at Le Fevre High School for full year. Within this course there are opportunities to develop a range of employability skills related to the care and development of children and it is highly linked to careers in Early Childhood.

The course focuses on children and their development from conception to 8 years of age and incorporates practical and theoretical activities, working individually and in groups. Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of young children through individual, collaborative, and practical learning.

They explore concepts such as the development, needs, and rights of children, the value of play, concepts of childhood and families, and the roles of parents and care-givers. Students have opportunities to build their understanding of the range of attitudes, values, and beliefs of people in the wider community in relation to children and child-rearing practices. They also consider the importance of behaviour management, child nutrition, and the health and well-being of children.

There are five areas of study in Stage 2 Child Studies, as listed below:

  • Contemporary and Future Issues
  • Economic and Environmental Influences
  • Political and Legal Influences
  • Sociocultural Influences
  • Technological Influences

 

For a 20-credit subject, students provide evidence of their learning through seven assessments, including the external assessment component. Students undertake:

  • four practical activities (50%)
  • two group activities (20%)
  • one investigation (30%)

 

Child Studies Presentation

Course
Full Year

Health & PE: Health and Wellbeing

HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Health and Wellbeing is a SACE subject currently running at Le Fevre High School at Stage 1, and will be offered as a Stage 2 subject next year. Having good health and wellbeing is crucial to quality of life and is a fundamental human right. Even though it is one of the most talked about topics, and is currently trending worldwide, our Health is too often not treated as a priority. Students develop the knowledge, skills and understandings required to explore and understand influences and make decisions regarding health and wellbeing. They consider the role of health and wellbeing in different contexts and explore ways of promoting positive outcomes for individuals, communities and global society.

There are many areas of interest that Health and Wellbeing explores, and possible career pathways from this course could lead to health services, research, psychology, teaching or sport science.

Students learn strategies to improve their own mental/physical/emotional wellbeing and the community around them. Health and Wellbeing is a 20-credit subject at Stage 2 that consists of the following concepts:

  • Health literacy
  • Health determinants
  • Social equity
  • Health promotion

 

For a 20-credit subject, students complete five assessments the external assessment component. Students undertake:

  • Two Initiative Tasks (40%)
  • Two Folio Tasks (30%)
  • One Inquiry (30%)

 

 Health & Wellbeing Presentation

Course
Full Year

Health & PE: Physical Education

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education can be studied as an elective at Stage 2.

CONTENT:

Through Physical Education, students explore the participation in and performance of human physical activities. It is an experiential subject in which students explore their physical capacities and investigate the factors that influence and improve participation and performance outcomes, which lead to greater movement confidence and competence. An integrated approach to learning in Physical Education supports an Arnoldian1 educational framework that promotes deep learning ‘in, through and about’ physical activity. Physical activities can include sports, theme-based games, fitness and recreational activities. Classes can undertake a learning and assessment program using a single focus approach (e.g. single sport) or can undertake multiple sports, games and/or activities. Topics that are undertaken include:

Focus Area 1: In movement

  • Application of Energy Sources affecting physical performance
  • Application of the effects of training on physical performance
  • How does biomechanics affect physical activity and movement?
  • Practical application of learning theories
  • Psychology of sporting performance
  • Movement concepts and performance

 

Focus Area 2: Through movement

  • Social psychology
  • Psychology of sporting performance
  • Barriers and enablers to physical activity
  • Social strategies to manipulate equity in participation
  • Personal influences.

 

Focus Area 3: About movement

  • Energy Sources affecting human performance
  • Physiological factors affecting performance
  • The effects of training on physical performance
  • Technological developments in biomechanics
  • The learning process
  • The learning journey

 

ASSESSMENT:

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria based on the learning requirements and performance standards describing their level of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

School Assessment

  • Assessment Type 1: Diagnostics (30%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Improvement Analysis (40%)

 

External Assessment

  • Assessment Type 3: Group Dynamics Task (30%) external

For more information, please click link below:

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS:

It is expected that students change into the PE uniform for all practical lessons and wear appropriate footwear, as directed by their PE teacher.

For more information, please click link below:

Physical Education Presentation

Course
Full Year

Humanities: Aboriginal Studies

ABORIGINAL STUDIES

In Aboriginal Studies, students learn from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice. Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities is integral to students developing and extending respectful ways of thinking, communicating, understanding, and acting. Through their learning in this subject, students draw on elements of history, sociology, politics, arts, and literature. Students acknowledge and extend their understanding of the narratives and accomplishments as told by Aboriginal peoples, and reflect on the impact of past events on the present and the future. They develop respect for what narratives and accomplishments mean to different Aboriginal peoples and communities.
Students analyse the historical and contemporary experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and communities. They examine the intergenerational influence and impact of government policies, past and present, on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples and communities today. Students investigate experiences of ongoing resistance and survival, and learn about initiatives and accomplishments developed in response to these experiences.
Diversity is at the heart of learning in Aboriginal Studies. Students develop their understanding of the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ identities and experiences, including cultural, political, linguistic, and contextual diversity. They acknowledge and extend their understanding of the diversity and the historical, social, and political importance of Aboriginal cultural expressions, and learn from a wide range of cultural expressions including painting, music, performance, literature, and oral traditions.
Students engage in learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities to develop respect for and awareness of the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities. They develop and extend their respect for and understanding of cultural protocols, and reflect on the diversity of cultures. They develop respectful ways of thinking, listening, communicating, and acting, and the skills that will enable them to take action to promote social justice.
In this subject, ‘Aboriginal peoples’ refers to all Indigenous peoples of Australia.

Whilst it is not necessary to complete Aboriginal Studies in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

ASSESSMENT
The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies.

School assessment (70%)
• Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey (40%)
• Assessment Type 2: Social Action (30%)

External assessment (30%)
• Assessment Type 3: Acknowledgment (30%).

Students provide evidence of their learning through five assessments, including the external assessment component. Students complete
• three responses in the learning journey
• one social action
• one acknowledgment.

Course
Full Year

Humanities: Legal Studies

LEGAL STUDIES

A study of four topics provides an exploration of the Australian legal system from the local level to its global connections. Students examine the key concepts of parliamentary democracy, constitutional government, and participation. Central to this understanding is the concept that law-making and dispute resolution are social forces that can affect individuals or groups; generate social, economic, or technological change; and cause conflict or inequity within society.
Whilst it is not necessary to complete Legal Studies in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

Topics cover four broad groups:
• The Australian Legal System
• Constitutional Government
• Law-making
• Justice Systems

ASSESSMENT
School Based Assessment
• Folio 50%
• Inquiry 20%

External Assessment
• Exam 30%

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Course
Full Year

Humanities: Modern History

MODERN HISTORY

In the study of Modern History at Stage 2, students investigate the growth of modern nations at a time of rapid global change. They engage in a study of one nation, and of interactions between or among nations. They explore relationships among nations and groups, examine some significant and distinctive features of the world since 1945, and consider their impact on the contemporary world.

Students study one topic from ‘Modern nations’ and one topic from ‘The world since 1945’, selected from the following list of topics:

Modern nations The world since 1945
Topic 1: Australia (1901–56) Topic 7: The changing world order (1945– )
Topic 2: United States of America (1914–45) Topic 8: Australia’s relationship with Asia and the South Pacific Region (1945– )
Topic 3: Germany (1918–48) Topic 9: National self-determination in South-East Asia (1945– )
Topic 4: The Soviet Union and Russia (1945–c.2004) Topic 10: The struggle for peace in the Middle East (1945– )
Topic 5: Indonesia (1942–2005) Topic 11: Challenges to peace and security (1945– )
Topic 6: China (1949–c.2012) Topic 12: The United Nations and establishment of a global perspective (1945–)

 

Whilst it is not necessary to complete Modern History or Ancient Studies in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

  ASSESSMENT

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in Stage 2 Modern History:

School assessment (70%)

  • Assessment Type 1: Historical Skills (50% – 5 tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Historical Study (20% – 1 task)

 

External assessment (30%)

  • Assessment Type 3: Examination (30%)

 

Course
Full Year

Humanities: Society and Culture

SOCIETY AND CULTURE

The social inquiry approach to learning forms the core of the study of Society and Culture. Students develop skills in various approaches to, and methods of, investigating and analysing contemporary social issues. Students are encouraged to ask their own questions, explore possible sources of information, to develop solutions and carry out appropriate social action. It is possible for students to negotiate particular topics of study that are relevant to their own positions and practices.

Topics cover three broad groups:
• Culture e.g. Cultural Diversity
• Contemporary Challenges e.g. Social Ethics
• Global Issues e.g. a question of rights.

Whilst it is not necessary to complete Society & Culture in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

ASSESSMENT

School-based assessment
• Folio 50%
• Interaction 20%

External Assessment
• Investigation 30%

 

Course
Full Year

Humanities: Womens Studies

WOMEN’S STUDIES

Women’s Studies will interest and inspire both female and male students. It offers students an opportunity to explore the construction of gender, of femininity and masculinity within different cultures and to consider how this affects the position of women within society. The approach adopted in Women’s Studies is interdisciplinary so students can explore areas as diverse as History, Media and Film, Literature, Religion, Legal Studies, Politics, Art and Health.

Students use their understanding of gender identity (femininity/masculinity), gender relations (gender stereotypes, public/private distinction), and identity as difference (identity politics) to work through four to six of the following key issues:

  • Issue 1: Representations of Women in Cultural Texts
  • Issue 2: Women and Work
  • Issue 3: Family Life and Caring
  • Issue 4: Health and Well-being
  • Issue 5: Women and the Law
  • Issue 6: Women’s Struggles, Achievements, and Empowerment
  • Issue 7: Women, Culture, and Society
  • Issue 8: Lifestyle and Choice
  • Issue 9: Communication and Technology
  • Issue 10: Development and Globalisation
  • Issue 11: Negotiated Issue.

 

Whilst it is not necessary to complete Gender Studies in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

 ASSESSMENT

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in
Stage 2 Women’s Studies:

School Based Assessment (70%)

  • Assessment Type 1: Text Analysis (20% – 1-2 tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Essay (20% – 1 task)
  • Assessment Type 3: Folio (30% – 3 tasks)

 

External Assessment (30%)

  • Assessment Type 4: Issues Analysis (30% – 1 task)

 

 

Course
Full Year

Indonesian

INDONESIAN

This course is available to students who have passed and completed 20 credits of stage 1 Indonesian.

CONTENT

Stage 2 Indonesian continues the study of the following three themes each with a number of topics and sub-topics:

  • The individual (eg sport and recreation, personal world)
  • The Indonesian-speaking Communities (eg visiting Indonesia, religion, gender)
  • The changing world (eg environment, youth issues)

Through these themes, course work and an in-depth study, the students develop a deeper understanding and confidence in their knowledge and expression of Indonesian.

ASSESSMENT

There are 3 major components:

  • Exam 30%
  • Folio 50%
  • In-depth Study 20%

The folio mark is based on 3-5 main assessment tasks

 

 

 

 

 

Course
Full Year

Mathematics: General Maths

MATHEMATICS - GENERAL MATHEMATICS

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:

A C grade or better in Stage 1 General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods.

General Mathematics extends students’ mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem solving. A problem-based approach is integral to the development of mathematical models and the associated key concepts in the topics. Topics cover a diverse range of applications of mathematics, including personal financial management, the statistical investigation process, modelling using linear and non-linear functions, and discrete modelling using networks and matrices. Successful completion of General Mathematics at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses requiring a non-specialised background in mathematics and for careers in the more technical trades.

 CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 2 General Mathematics:

  • Modelling with Linear Relationships
  • Modelling with Matrices (may be replaced with an Open Topic)
  • Statistical Models
  • Financial Models
  • Discrete Models

 

ASSESSMENT

  • Investigations Folio (two Mathematical Investigations: 30%)
  • Skill and Applications Tasks (five SATs: 40%)
  • External Examination (2 hours, covering topics 3,4, and 5: 30%)

 

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance in courses such as Accounting, Architecture, Commerce, Economics, Nursing, Science, Agricultural Science, Agri-business, Business Management, Aviation, Construction Management, Information Technology, Building Trades, Building Design, etc

 

Course
Full Year

Mathematics: Mathematical Methods

MATHEMATICS - MATHEMATICAL METHODS

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:

A C grade or better in Stage 1 Mathematical Methods.

Mathematical Methods focuses on developing sophisticated understanding of calculus and statistics. By using functions and their derivatives and integrals, and by mathematically modelling physical processes, students develop a deep understanding of the physical world through a sound knowledge of relationships involving rates of change. Students use statistics to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation. Mathematical Methods provides the foundation for further study in mathematics, economics, computer sciences, and the sciences. It prepares students for courses and careers that may involve the use of statistics, such as health or social sciences. When studied together with Specialist Mathematics, this subject can be a pathway to engineering, physical science, and laser physics

 CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 2 Mathematical Methods:

  • Further Differentiation and Applications
  • Discrete Random Variables
  • Integral Calculus
  • Logarithmic Functions
  • Continuous Random Variables and the Normal Distribution
  • Sampling and Confidence Intervals

 

ASSESSMENT

  • Mathematical Investigation (20%)
  • Skill and Applications Tasks (six SATs: 50%)
  • External Examination (3 hours: 30%)

 

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance.

 

Course
Full Year

Mathematics: Specialist Mathematics

MATHEMATICS - SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:

A C grade or better in 10 or 20 credits of Stage 1 Specialist Mathematics.

Specialist Mathematics draws on and deepens students’ mathematical knowledge, skills, and understanding, and provides opportunities for students to develop their skills in using rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs, and using mathematical models. It includes the study of functions and calculus. The subject leads to study in a range of tertiary courses such as mathematical sciences, engineering, computer science, and physical sciences. Students envisaging careers in related fields will benefit from studying this subject.

 CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 2 Mathematical Specialist:

  • Mathematical Induction
  • Complex Numbers
  • Functions and Sketching Graphs
  • Vectors in Three Dimensions
  • Integration Techniques and Applications
  • Rates of Change and Differential Equations.

 

ASSESSMENT

  • Mathematical Investigation (20%)
  • Skill and Applications Tasks (six SATs: 50%)
  • External Examination (3 hours: 30%)

 

FUTURE PATHWAYS

The subject leads to study in a range of tertiary courses such as mathematical sciences, engineering, computer science, and physical sciences. Students envisaging careers in related fields will benefit from studying this subject.

 

 

Course
Full Year

Science: Biology

BIOLOGY

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Biology

Students complete one Science as a Human Endeavour (SHE) Investigation report. Students research a contemporary example of how science interacts with society. Students select and explore a recent discovery, innovation, issue, or advance linked to one of the topics in Stage 2 Biology, analyse and synthesise information from different sources to explain the science relevant to the focus of their investigation, show its connections to science as a human endeavour, and develop a conclusion relevant to their research.

Students undertake two practical investigations, one investigation with a focus on Science as a Human Endeavour (SHE). The focus of the SHE practical investigation is determined by individual students with guidance from the classroom teacher.

Students undertake skills and applications tasks (SATs) for each topic in the form of topic tests, completed under supervision.

Students undertake an external examination to assess inquiry skills and science understanding from all Stage 2 Biology topics studied. The examination requires students to demonstrate understanding of science as a human endeavour and apply science understanding from all four topics.

Students need to be aware that some knowledge of chemistry is assumed.

There are 4 themes covered in this full year course. They are:

  • DNA and Proteins
  • Cells as the Basis of Life
  • Homeostasis
  • Evolution

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Biology consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

  • Examination (30%): 130 minutes, assessed externally – online examination
  • Investigations Folio (30%): Consists of a Science as a Human Endeavour investigation report and two practical investigations
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (40%): Consists of 4 topic tests, one for each topic studied

 

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include medical research, veterinary science, food and marine sciences, agriculture, biotechnology, environmental rehabilitation, biosecurity, quarantine, conservation, and ecotourism.

 

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Course
Full Year

Science: Chemistry

CHEMISTRY

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Chemistry

Good passes in both units of Stage 1 Chemistry are assumed for this course. There is a significant overlap with Stage 2 Biology.

 CONTENT

  • Monitoring the Environment
  • Managing Chemical Processes
  • Organic and Biological Chemistry
  • Managing Resources

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Chemistry consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

  • Examination 30%
  • Investigations Folio 30%
  • Skills and Applications Tasks 40%

 

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include medical or pharmaceutical research, pharmacy, chemical engineering, food science and technologies materials innovation and scientific research.

 

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Course
Full Year

Science: Naval Engineering (Advanced) Integrated Learning

NAVAL ENGINEERING (ADVANCED) INTEGRATED LEARNING

Although desirable, it is not necessary to have undertaken Stage 1 Naval Engineering to enrol in Advanced Stage 2 Naval Engineering. This full year hands-on STEM course – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – is suitable for students who are interested in Applied Science, Engineering and Technology. In this course, Applied Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics are used to explore and explain current scientific issues in primarily a Maritime environment. Students become aware of the significance of Mathematics and Science to address a range of Engineering challenges. The Science and Mathematics studied also relate to many vocational pathways.

N.B: This subject has an externally assessed component (Personal Endeavour) and therefore can be used towards an ATAR. Worthy of note is the fact that if students do their work properly, it is very easy to get a very high ATAR score in this subject, which could significantly boost their overall ATAR score.

This course centres on personal and group research activities as well as practical exercises of design and construction of models to test theories, by using Mathematics, Science and the latest CNC Laser cutting technology.

CONTENT ( 20 SACE credits )

  • Relationship between shape and function of hulls
  • Scale Calculations of the volumes of hulls. Simpson’s Method. Displacement and Displacement curves
  • Archimedes Principle applied to ship and floating structures
  • Study of Stability and Stability curves
  • Study of traditional and modern building materials and their applications in engineering designs
  • The STEM of RAS (Replenishment at Sea) and ballistics applied to the flight trajectory of projectiles in the Earth’s gravitational field.
  • STEM and Cultural Study of Woomeras and Spears ( Spear Throwers are called Midla in Kaurna )
  • Mathematics and Science of Optics. SNELL’s law: Effect on the path of Electromagnetic and Oceanic Waves
  • Elements of Electronics: Speed regulator for electric motors, Remote control technology and control systems
  • Current Applications of Electromagnetic spectrum and radio waves. Applications in Radar, GPS and Navigation Technologies
  • Sea vessels future developments – Sea exploration

 

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to test a remote-controlled working ship model. Students will also have the opportunity, time permitting, to build from A to Z, a full-scale wooden Sailing and Rowing Dingy and test it in a safe location. In the process, they will study the Physics, Science and Engineering Principles relating to Forces, Buoyancy, Displacement, Stability, Aerodynamics, Science of Materials, and Navigation.

Excursions may include if available, visits to the Osborne Shipyards to research Design and Engineering specifications relating to ship building techniques and the Engineering Department of Flinders University at Tonsley Park.

Le Fevre High School, as the Maritime School of South Australia is privileged to have Industry links and contacts, which ensure the direct relevance of this Naval Engineering course. This prepares students for industry pathways which include Tafe courses but also Engineering studies at Flinders University and beyond this, the Australian Maritime College Engineering courses (University of Tasmania), which can open doors for students to get a job in the very lucrative Maritime Industry branches in South Australia and indeed the world.

ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Scale calculations, Archimedes Principle and Displacement Curves – STEM of projectiles, Replenishment at sea from ship to ship, Physics of Ballistics and Woomera/Midla – Applications of Snell’s law in Optics and in the direction of Ocean waves.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of marine technology and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Endeavour – Research: Students produce an essay about a chosen Maritime topic and are invited to reflect on their learning experience. This is an externally assessed task, yielding an ATAR score.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this full year course.

  • Practical Inquiries 40 %
  • Connections Task – Group Activity 30 %
  • Personal Endeavour (Externally assessed – ATAR) 30 %

 

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Course
Full Year

Science: Physics

PHYSICS

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Physics

The course assumes mathematical abilities commensurate with having done geometry, trigonometry, and mathematical functions in Stage 1. It is also assumed that students have a sound knowledge of both Stage 1 Physics units.

 CONTENT

Areas covered within the Stage 2 course include:

  • Motion and Relativity
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Light and Atoms

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Physics consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

  • Examination (30%)
  • Investigations Folio (30%)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (40%)

 

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include engineering, renewable energy generation, communications, materials innovation, transport and vehicle safety, medical science, scientific research, and the exploration of the universe.

 

 

Course
Full Year

Stage 2 Non Tertiary Admission Subjects

COMMUNITY STUDIES A & B

At our school students may do Community Studies within the mainstream subject after consultation with the subject teacher. Students do not choose the subject during Course Counselling day. The subject teacher manages the contract or plan.

Students learn in a community context and interact with teachers, peers, and community members. They decide the focus of their community activity/community application activity, which begins from a point of personal interest, skill, or knowledge.

By setting challenging and achievable goals in their community activity/community application activity, students enhance their knowledge and understanding in a guided and supported learning program. They develop their capacity to work independently and to apply their skills and knowledge in practical ways in their community.

As a non Tertiary Admission Subject (non TAS), Stage 2 Community Studies may contribute to SACE completion but cannot be counted towards an ATAR.

Course
Full Year and Semester Elective

Workplace Practices

WORKPLACE PRACTICES

Workplace Practices at Stage 2 involves the development of knowledge, skills and understanding of the nature, type, and structure of the workplace. Students learn the relationship between work-related issues and practices, the changing nature of work, industrial relations and workplace issues that may be local, national, global, or industry specific. Students can undertake learning in the workplace and reflect on and evaluate their experiences in relation to their capabilities, interests, and aspirations.  The subject may include the undertaking of vocational education and training (VET) as provided under the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF).

CONTENT

Workplace Practices is a 20‑credit subject at Stage 2. The teaching program includes the following areas of study:

Industry and Work Knowledge

  • Topic 1: Work in Australian Society
  • Topic 2: The Changing Nature of Work
  • Topic 3: Industrial Relations
  • Topic 4: Finding Employment
  • Topic 5: Negotiated Topic.

 

Vocational Learning and/or Vocational Education and Training (VET).

 ASSESSMENT

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School-based Assessment

  • Folio 25%
  • Performance 25%
  • Reflection 20%

 

External Assessment                        

  • Investigation 30%

 

 

Course
Full Year
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Subject

SAASTA

SAASTA PATHWAYS PROGRAM

SAASTA ACE Aboriginal Careers Exploration Program – Year 10 students

The Aboriginal Career Exploration ‘ACE’ program is available to Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander students in year 10.  This course offers 20 SACE Credits. Students in the ACE program participate in several components of the Secondary SAASTA program including the Aboriginal Power Cup.

The ACE program runs for a year, is designed to support Aboriginal students to be successful on their pathway to becoming ‘work ready’ and provides opportunities to learn directly from employers about work and identify skills that are valued in the workplace.

Through participation in industry/employer immersion, work readiness training, and VET skills clusters, students will participate in culturally responsive experiences which provide a stronger understanding of pathways through vocational training and towards employment and/or further education.

The ACE Program consists of the following components

  • 1 line of lessons per week to complete essential tasks and content
  • 6 half day career development workshops
  • 2 half-day workshops each term, delivered by Workabout Centre staff including an Aboriginal perspective across work readiness and employability activities, e.g. resumes, interviews, body language, perception from employers, rights and responsibilities in the workplace, essential identification, and career exploration.

 

By the end of the course, students present a completed folio of evidence including career match activities, industry targeted resume and cover letter, response to job advertisements and questions, Career Action Plan Career Expo attendance and Industry immersion activities.

 

The South Australian Aboriginal Secondary Training Academy (SAASTA) -Year 11 and 12 students

The Le Fevre South Australian Aboriginal Secondary Training Academy (SAASTA) is a cluster academy with Findon High School and Seaton High School.  The Academy runs once a week for a day in our Tirkanthi Kuu Room (Learning place in Kaurna language) and includes a variety of valuable cultural and learning experiences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

The SAASTA program runs for the entire year and is divided into two focus semesters, the ‘Aboriginal Power Cup’, focusing on Aboriginal culture and various aspects of AFL and the ‘SAASTA Shield’, which could focus on any variety of any two sports. Through the SAASTA Academy, students gain access to a variety of invaluable experiences including learning and performing a cultural dance on Adelaide Oval, designing and wearing a personalised guernsey for the Aboriginal Power Cup and cultural workshops with AFL players.

The SAASTA secondary program is open to year 11 and 12 students and offers 20 SACE Credits.

 

SAASTA Specialist Academies

SAASTA offers a variety of specialist academies to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander secondary students via individual application.  Students with a special interest in particular focus areas are encouraged to apply.  These academies are run over the entire year and are held at a variety of host sites including St Clair Recreation Centre and the University of SA.

Entrance to these academies occurs through an application and trial process which is scheduled during term 4 of each year. Participation in these academies allows students to develop their skills in their chosen field with the assistance of specialised teachers and coaches.

Specialist SAASTA Academies include:

  • The Aboriginal Basketball Academy (ABA) – St Clair Recreation Centre
  • The Aboriginal Netball Academy (ANA) – Netball SA
  • The Women’s Aboriginal AFL Academy (WAAA) – Port Adelaide Football Club
  • Aboriginal STEM Academy (ASA) – The University of Adelaide

 

Our SAASTA staff will inform students as to when the SAASTA specialist academy application process is open.

From the SAASTA information guide

“SAASTA offers young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander South Australians a range of highly engaging learning and personal development opportunities. SAASTA builds on the education offered in our schools, giving students opportunities for ongoing personal growth and cultural experience.

SAASTA provides Aboriginal school students with a unique sporting and educational program. Our academies work with school leaders and local communities across South Australia to provide students with the skills, opportunities and confidence to dream, believe and achieve in the areas of sport, education, employment, healthy living and connection with their culture.

SAASTA is available to both male and female students in years 10, 11 and 12 who are studying the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE).

Enrolment is open to any Aboriginal student who is committed and passionate about pursuing success in education and building a strong foundation for their future. Every academy student is encouraged to aim high and to raise the bar of expectation they place on themselves and their peers, particularly in the areas of attendance, participation, educational performance and behaviour. Because of this approach academy students are widely considered as role models for their schools, families and communities”.

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Subject

Special Features and Programs

LE FEVRE LIGHTNING ‘KARNDO’ ICE HOCKEY TEAM

The Ice Factor program is about creating an opportunity for students to be involved in a team sport and to learn ice hockey skills as well as life skills. In being a part of a team, students learn to communicate, respect themselves and each other and learn to work as a team.

To date, the students have been involved with selecting a jersey design, creating a logo and selecting a team name. The students came up with the name ‘Le Fevre Lightning – Karndo’. To be able to use the Kaurna word for lightning – Karndo -we requested and received permission from the Kaurna Warra Pintyandi (KYP) group. The majority of students involved with the program agreed it was an important acknowledgement of the Kaurna people.

Le Fevre is the tenth school to be involved with the program. Currently the team is a combination of Year 8, 9, 10 and 11 students. Once a week the students participate in skill work and practice on the ice and team meetings. At the end of the term all ten schools compete in a tournament at the Ice Arena.

Course
Full Year

SPECIALIST FOOTBALL - SOCCER

For further information, please refer to the subject descriptors in each year level.

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Subject

VET AT LE FEVRE HIGH SCHOOL

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (VET)

CERTIFICATE I IN HOSPITALITY – HOSPITALITY PATHWAYS PROGRAM

This qualification reflects the role of individuals who participate in a range of routine and predictable hospitality work activities. They work under close supervision and are given clear directions to complete tasks.

This qualification provides a pathway to work in various hospitality settings, such as restaurants, hotels, motels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops.

Possible job titles include:

  • bar useful
  • food runner
  • glass runner
  • housekeeping assistant
  • kitchen steward
  • kitchen useful.

 

This course is a preparatory course for students who would like to go on and do the Certificate II in Kitchen Operations Course in year 11.

An additional fee of $100 is required for students to participate in this course.

Course Code – SIT10216 Certificate I in Hospitality 

BSBWOR203 Work Effectively with Others

SITXCCS001 Provide customer information and assistance

SITXWHS001 Participate in Safe Work Practices

SITHCCC002 Prepare and present simple dishes

SITHCCC003 Prepare and present sandwiches

SITXFSA001 Use Hygienic practices for food safety

 

CERTIFICATE II IN KITCHEN OPERATIONS

RTO: CEG Training Partnerships – Adelaide Institute of Hospitality

HOST ORGANISATION: Henley High School

LENGTH: 1 year

DESCRIPTION: This qualification reflects the role of individuals working in kitchens who use a defined and limited range of food preparation and cookery skills to prepare food and menu items. They are involved in mainly routine and repetitive tasks and work under direct supervision. This qualification does not provide the skills required by commercial cooks, which are covered in SIT30816 Certificate III in Commercial Cookery.

This qualification provides a pathway to work in kitchen operations in organisations such as restaurants, hotels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops; and institutions such as aged care facilities, hospitals, prisons, and schools.

Possible job titles include:

  • breakfast cook
  • catering assistant
  • fast food cook
  • sandwich hand
  • takeaway cook

 

PATHWAYS: This qualification provides a pathway to work in kitchen operations in organisations such as restaurants, hotels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops; and institutions such as aged care facilities, hospitals, prisons, and schools.

Students can progress to studying a Certificate 3 Kitchen Operations as a part of their year 12 studies and/or move into a school based apprenticeship. For more information on school based apprenticeships please visit https://www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/school-based-apprenticeships

PREREQUISITES: Nil

DELIVERY LOCATION: Adelaide Institute of Hospitality 192 Pirie St Adelaide Henley High School Cudmore Tce HENLEY BEACH SA 5022

DATES AND TIMES: 1 day per school calendar week, 9am until 4pm.

COMMENCEMENT DATE: Week 1, Term 1 2023.

WORK PLACEMENT: 70 hours.

SACE DETAILS: SACE Stage 1 (Year 11), 55 SACE credits.

QUALIFICATION: Cert II in Kitchen Operations (National code SIT20416).

COMPETENCIES:

BSBWOR203 – Work Effectively with Others (15 nominal hours)

SITHCCCO001 – Use Food Preparation Equipment (25 nominal hours)

SITHCCC005 – Produce Dishes Using Basic Methods of Cookery (45 nominal hours)

SITHCCC011 – Use Cookery Skills Effectively (50 nominal hours)

SITHKOPO01 – Clean Kitchen Premises and Equipment (13 nominal hours)

SITXFSAO01 – Use Hygienic Practices for Food Safety (15 nominal hours)

SITXWHS0O01 – Participate in Safe Work Practices (12 nominal hours)

SITXINVO02 – Maintain the Quality of Perishable Items (10 nominal hours)

SITHCCCO006 – Prepare Appetisers and Salads (25 nominal hours)

SITHCCCO007 – Prepare Stocks Soups and Sauces (35 nominal hours)

SITHCCCO008 – Prepare Vegetables, Fruit, Egg and Farinaceous Dishes (45 nominal hours)

SITHASCO01 – Prepare Dishes Using Basic Methods of Asian Cookery (90 nominal hours)

SITHCCC018 – Prepare Food to Meet Special Dietary Requirements (75 nominal hours)

FEES: $220 per student.

NUMBER OF STUDENTS: Minimum 10 – Maximum 15

SELECTION PROCESS: VETRO, Students need to be on a proven Hospitality Pathway, Interview with the school.

CONTACT: VET Co-ordinator Ben Jones P: 8449 7004 E: ben.jones211@schools.sa.edu.au

 

 

CERTIFICATE II IN ENGINEERING PATHWAYS

RTO: PEER VEET Plumbing, Electrical, Electronic and Refrigeration Vocational Education Employment & Training

HOST ORGANISATION: Le Fevre High School

LENGTH: 1 year

DESCRIPTION: Students will gain a wide range of skills and knowledge across engineering tasks, with a focus on practical activities using common workplace tools.

PATHWAYS: The skills you learn in this course will give you an entry point to a career in an engineering-related workplace.

PREREQUISITES: To complete this course and get started in an engineering-related career, you should have a good understanding of both English and General Mathematics.

DELIVERY LOCATION: 1042 Port Rd, Albert Park SA 5014

DATES AND TIMES: To be held 1 day a week from 8.00am-4.00pm on either a Wednesday or Friday, which day has yet to be confirmed.

COMMENCEMENT DATE: Week 1, Term 1 2022.

WORK PLACEMENT: To be advised.

SACE DETAILS: SACE Stage 1 (Year 11), 55 SACE credits.

QUALIFICATION: Cert II in Engineering Pathway (National code MEM20413).

COMPETENCIES:

MEM13014A – Apply principles of occupational health & safety in the work environment (10 nominal hours)

MSAENV272B – Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices (30 nominal hours)

MEMPE005A – Develop a career plan for the engineering & manufacturing industry (20 nominal hours)

MEMPE006A – Undertake a basic engineering project (80 nominal hours)

MEM16006A – Organise & communicate information (20 nominal hours)

MEM18001C – Use hand tools (20 nominal hours)

MEM18002B – Use power tools/hand held operations (20 nominal hours)

MEMPE002A – Use electric welding machines (40 nominal hours)

MEMPE003A – Use oxy-acetylene and soldering equipment (40 nominal hours) MEMPE004A – Use fabrication equipment (40 nominal hours)

MEMPE007A – Pull apart and re-assemble engineering mechanisms (30 nominal hours)

MSAPMSUP106A – Work in a team (30 nominal hours)

FEES: $300.00. Students will be required to purchase steel capped boots and long pants. NO polyester blends are allowed.

NUMBER OF STUDENTS: Minimum 10 – Maximum 14

SELECTION PROCESS: LLN test and interview.

CONTACT: VET Co-ordinator Ben Jones – Ph: 8449 7004 E: ben.jones211@schools.sa.edu.au

CERTIFICATE II IN MARITIME OPERATIONS

RTO: Australian Maritime and Fisheries Academy

HOST ORGANISATION: Le Fevre High School

LENGTH: 1 year

DESCRIPTION: This is an entry level course that will provide students with maritime skills and knowledge to enable them to be immediately employable as Deck Hands as well as giving them significant credit in a Coxswain course. This will be able to be completed once students have gained sufficient documented time at sea.

PATHWAYS: This qualification will assist students to fast track their maritime career in either marine engineering or as a deck officer. The units of competency completed during this course will gain credit toward a Coxswain qualification. This can be completed when students reach the age of 18 and have spent sufficient time at sea.

PREREQUISITES: Students must be 16 years of age before course commences.

DELIVERY LOCATION: Australian Maritime and Fisheries Academy

DATES AND TIMES: 5 days in the last week of terms 1, 2 and 3 from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm each day.  This course may also include a sea voyage.

COMMENCEMENT DATE: Week 11, Term 1 2022.

WORK PLACEMENT: To be advised.

SACE DETAILS: SACE Stage 1 (Year 11), 60 SACE credits.

QUALIFICATION: Certificate II in Maritime Operations (Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal)

COMPETENCIES:

HLTAID003 – Provide first Aid

MARB027 – Perform basic servicing and maintenance of main propulsion unit and auxiliary systems

MARC037 – Operate inboard and outboard motors

MARC038 – Operate main propulsion unit and auxiliary systems

MARF027 – Apply basic survival skills in the event of vessel abandonment

MARF028 – Follow procedures to minimise and fight fires on board a vessel

MARF029 – Meet work health and safety requirements

MARF030 – Survive at sea using survival craft

MARH013 – Plan and navigate a passage for a vessel up to 12 metres

MARI003 – Comply with regulations to ensure safe operation of a vessel up to 12 metres

MARJ006 – Follow environmental work practices

MARK007 – Handle a vessel up to 12 metres

MARN008 – Apply seamanship skills aboard a vessel up to 12 metres

FEES: $95.00

SELECTION PROCESS: LLN test and interview.

CONTACT: Maritime Leader Liam Narcys – Ph: 8449 7004 E: liam.narcys802@schools.sa.edu.au

Additional VET Opportunities in 2023

In addition to the courses and subjects outlined in this handbook, students can access a broad range of opportunities in Vocational Education and Training offered at other schools through the Western Adelaide Regional VET Programs and private RTO’s in consultation with the VET coordinator. Students remain enrolled at their Home School, and attend the Host School or RTO for their chosen VET program. For more information please visit www.wats.sa.edu.au and discuss with the VET Coordinator.