Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) is a subject that combines History, Geography, Civics and Citizenship and Economics and Business. Each of these subjects is taught throughout the year within their own distinct units.

In Year 8 Students will engage in the following topics:

History: Students will study history from the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern period c.650– 1750 CE. They will explore Medieval Europe (c.590 – 1500 CE), The Polynesian expansion across the Pacific (c.700 – 1756 CE) and The Black Death (14th century plague).

Geography: Students will study two core units of Landforms and Landscapes and Changing Nations. They will investigate the processes that shape landforms and the importance cultural groups put on both landforms and landscapes. Students will also learn about the hazards associated with landscapes. Then in Changing Nations students will investigate the changing human geography of countries and the spatial distribution of populations. Heavy emphasis in these units is placed on geographical skills.

Civics and Citizenship: Students in the unit will explore the responsibilities and the freedoms of citizens and how Australians can actively participate in democracy. Students will also investigate how laws are made and used in Australia. Students will also grapple with the concept of national identity and what it means to be Australian.

Economics and Business: Students will explore the ways markets work within Australia, including the participants in the market system and the way they influence its operation. The focus in year 8 is on national and regional market issues.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the distinct Achievement Standard for each of the subjects represented in the Australian HAAS Curriculum:

Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) is a subject that combines History, Geography, Civics and Citizenship and Economics and Business. Each of these subjects is taught throughout the year within their own distinct units.

In Year 7 Students will engage in the following topics:

History: Students will study history from the time of the earliest human communities to the end of the ancient period, approximately 60 000 BCE – c.650 CE. They will explore the ways we investigate the ancient past, Ancient Egypt as well as touching on Ancient China and Ancient Aboriginal Culture.

Geography: The course adopts an inquiry-based approach to the importance of Water and the place it has in our world as well as the concepts of Place and Liveability. A strong emphasis will be placed on global thinking with local action.

Civics and Citizenship: This course will explore the diversity of Australia, the role of The Constitution and the ways that we safeguard the rights and responsibilities of our people. A strong focus will be placed on action and active engagement in being part of a community.

Economics and Business: This unit will have students explore the concept and value of work, how we can be entrepreneurs and the relationship between customer and producers. A strong focus will be put on practical application of these concepts.

ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed according to the distinct Achievement Standard for each of the subjects represented in the Australian HAAS Curriculum:

The study of Outdoor Education provides students with opportunities to experience personal growth and to develop social skills, self-confidence, initiative, self-reliance, leadership, and collaborative skills. The development of their relationship with natural environments impacts positively on students’ health and wellbeing and fosters a lifelong connection with nature and a commitment to responsible activity in natural environments. In this subject, students will be supported to develop skills in planning and implementing outdoor journeys, demonstrate initiative, self-reliance, leadership, and a sense of responsibility towards others, investigate, critically analyse, and reflect on strategies that achieve sustainable use of natural environments (Aboriginal perspectives) and reflect on the personal, social and environmental outcomes of participation in an outdoor journey.

Students study Outdoor Education topics through three interrelated Focus Areas:

Students are assessed using the SACE Performance Standards. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

Please note, an additional fee of $300.00 (GST free) per student is required for participation in this course, which includes all students’ camp fees and excursions.

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The Specialist Football Program enables students with a passion for soccer to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in all aspects of football including playing, rules, tactics, fitness components and training principles. Students within the program are given the opportunity to receive specialist skills coaching, fitness development and participation in statewide soccer competitions. Topics covered in this course include:

Specialist Football at year 11 is run as a SACE subject of Integrated Learning and students gain 10 SACE credits within each semester studied. The school assessment component for Stage 1 Integrated Learning consists of three assessment types:

Assessment Type 1: Practical Exploration

Assessment Type 2: Connections

Assessment Type 3: Personal Venture

For more information, please click link below:

Workplace Practices at Stage 2 involves the development of knowledge, skills and understanding of the nature, type, and structure of the workplace. Students learn the relationship between work-related issues and practices, the changing nature of work, industrial relations and workplace issues that may be local, national, global, or industry specific. Students can undertake learning in the workplace and reflect on and evaluate their experiences in relation to their capabilities, interests, and aspirations.  The subject may include the undertaking of vocational education and training (VET) as provided under the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF).

CONTENT

Workplace Practices is a 20‑credit subject at Stage 2. The teaching program includes the following areas of study:

Industry and Work Knowledge

Vocational Learning and/or Vocational Education and Training (VET).

 ASSESSMENT

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School-based Assessment

External Assessment                        

At our school students may do Community Studies within the mainstream subject after consultation with the subject teacher. Students do not choose the subject during Course Counselling day. The subject teacher manages the contract or plan.

Students learn in a community context and interact with teachers, peers, and community members. They decide the focus of their community activity/community application activity, which begins from a point of personal interest, skill, or knowledge.

By setting challenging and achievable goals in their community activity/community application activity, students enhance their knowledge and understanding in a guided and supported learning program. They develop their capacity to work independently and to apply their skills and knowledge in practical ways in their community.

As a non Tertiary Admission Subject (non TAS), Stage 2 Community Studies may contribute to SACE completion but cannot be counted towards an ATAR.

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Physics

The course assumes mathematical abilities commensurate with having done geometry, trigonometry, and mathematical functions in Stage 1. It is also assumed that students have a sound knowledge of both Stage 1 Physics units.

 CONTENT

Areas covered within the Stage 2 course include:

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Physics consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include engineering, renewable energy generation, communications, materials innovation, transport and vehicle safety, medical science, scientific research, and the exploration of the universe.

Although desirable, it is not necessary to have undertaken Stage 1 Naval Engineering to enrol in Advanced Stage 2 Naval Engineering. This full year hands-on STEM course – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – is suitable for students who are interested in Applied Science, Engineering and Technology. In this course, Applied Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics are used to explore and explain current scientific issues in primarily a Maritime environment. Students become aware of the significance of Mathematics and Science to address a range of Engineering challenges. The Science and Mathematics studied also relate to many vocational pathways.

N.B: This subject has an externally assessed component (Personal Endeavour) and therefore can be used towards an ATAR. Worthy of note is the fact that if students do their work properly, it is very easy to get a very high ATAR score in this subject, which could significantly boost their overall ATAR score.

This course centres on personal and group research activities as well as practical exercises of design and construction of models to test theories, by using Mathematics, Science and the latest CNC Laser cutting technology.

CONTENT ( 20 SACE credits )

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to test a remote-controlled working ship model. Students will also have the opportunity, time permitting, to build from A to Z, a full-scale wooden Sailing and Rowing Dingy and test it in a safe location. In the process, they will study the Physics, Science and Engineering Principles relating to Forces, Buoyancy, Displacement, Stability, Aerodynamics, Science of Materials, and Navigation.

Excursions may include if available, visits to the Osborne Shipyards to research Design and Engineering specifications relating to ship building techniques and the Engineering Department of Flinders University at Tonsley Park.

Le Fevre High School, as the Maritime School of South Australia is privileged to have Industry links and contacts, which ensure the direct relevance of this Naval Engineering course. This prepares students for industry pathways which include Tafe courses but also Engineering studies at Flinders University and beyond this, the Australian Maritime College Engineering courses (University of Tasmania), which can open doors for students to get a job in the very lucrative Maritime Industry branches in South Australia and indeed the world.

ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Scale calculations, Archimedes Principle and Displacement Curves – STEM of projectiles, Replenishment at sea from ship to ship, Physics of Ballistics and Woomera/Midla – Applications of Snell’s law in Optics and in the direction of Ocean waves.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of marine technology and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Endeavour – Research: Students produce an essay about a chosen Maritime topic and are invited to reflect on their learning experience. This is an externally assessed task, yielding an ATAR score.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this full year course.

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Chemistry

Good passes in both units of Stage 1 Chemistry are assumed for this course. There is a significant overlap with Stage 2 Biology.

 CONTENT

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Chemistry consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include medical or pharmaceutical research, pharmacy, chemical engineering, food science and technologies materials innovation and scientific research.

In Stage 2 Biology, students continue to develop and extend their understanding of the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments.

Recommended background

20 credits of Stage 1 Biology at a C grade or better. A solid understanding of Stage 1 Biology content is vital.

Content

Stage 2 Biology is a 20-credit subject. The topics at Stage 2 are:

Students study all four topics. The topics can be sequenced and structured to suit individual groups of students.

Assessment

Most assessment at Stage 2 is school based, but moderated by the SACE Board. The external exam is assessed externally.

Students undertake two practical investigations and one investigation with a focus on science as a human endeavour. They complete four skills and applications tasks.

Students undertake an online examination to assess inquiry skills and science understanding from all Stage 2 Biology topics studied. The examination requires students to demonstrate understanding of science as a human endeavour and apply science understanding from all four topics.

The weightings for the 8 assessment tasks is:

Future pathways

Successful completion of Biology at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses where biological content knowledge is assumed or a prerequisite for enrolment.

Careers linked with this course include medical research, veterinary science, food and marine sciences, agriculture, biotechnology, environmental rehabilitation, biosecurity, quarantine, conservation, and ecotourism.

THRIVE • RESPECT • INTEGRITY

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