Learn more about the subjects available below.

Creative Arts

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: Open to all students but it is recommended that students have undertaken Year 10 Design, Digital Media or have an interest in Media Arts.

CONTENT: In Creative Arts students acquire an understanding how to produce arts products using digital media and technology. Students develop skills in communication and investigation of contemporary practitioners and media styles while applying a personal aesthetic. Students use the Creative Arts process to produce completely original pieces of digital art work and media products.

Topics covered in this course may include:

  • Manipulating and creating images in Adobe Photoshop
  • Manipulating and creating moving image and digital content in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed against the Creative Arts SACE performance standards.

Practical assessment: 60%

Completed student practical works

Folio Assessment: 40%

  • Skill acquisition assignment
  • Research and analysis task on media arts careers and pathways.

Visual Design and Creative Arts B

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: This is a second semester option for Visual Art Design students and Creative Arts, Media students. It is expected that students have undertaken Visual Art Design or Creative Arts Media in semester 1.

CONTENT: In this course students will build on skills, knowledge and understanding to produce Media Arts and Design Products/solutions leading to Stage 2 Design or Creative Arts. Students develop skills in communication and investigation of contemporary practitioners and media styles while applying a personal aesthetic to create digital solutions, arts products and advertising. Students use the creative process to produce completely original pieces of digital art, visual design and media products.

Topics covered in this course may include:

  • Manipulating and creating images and designs in Adobe Photoshop
  • Manipulating and creating moving image and digital content in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.
  • Using the design process

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed against the Creative Arts SACE performance standards.

Practical assessment: 60%

Completed student practical works

Folio Assessment: 40%

  • Skill acquisition assignment
  • Research and analysis task on contemporary practitioners, media arts careers and pathways.

Dance

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

In Stage 1 Dance students develop aesthetic and kinesthetic intelligence, using the body as an instrument for the expression and communication of ideas. Through the development of practical movement skills and choreographic and performance skills as an artist and experiencing performance as part of an audience, students explore and celebrate the human condition. They develop an appreciation of dance as an art form as well as a life enrichment opportunity connected to mental and physical wellbeing.

Dance prepares young people for participation in the 21st century by equipping them with transferrable skills, including critical and creative thinking skills, personal and social skills and intercultural understanding. Dance develops individuals who are reflective thinkers who can pose and solve problems and work both independently and collaboratively. The study of Stage 1 Dance establishes a basis for continuing to study Stage 2 Dance and for further education and employment across many fields, including the art and culture industries. It also provides opportunities to develop and pursue lifelong social and recreational activities.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA (3 STRANDS)

In this subject, students are expected to:

  • develop knowledge and understanding of the body, dance skills, dance elements, structural devices, production elements, and safe dance practice (Understanding dance)
  • apply technical and expressive dance skills in performance (Creating Dance)
  • communicate choreographic intent to an audience through composition & performance (Creating dance)
  • reflect on their own creative works as an artist and that of others as an audience (Responding to dance)
  • investigate dance in global contexts (Responding to dance).

Drama - Performing Arts

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In Drama, students engage in learning as authentic dramatic artists. Drama is active and participatory, involving the process of imagining, developing and creating original narratives, viewpoints and artistic products. Previous experience in Drama is preferable but not essential.

The following three areas of dramatic study are undertaken:

Assessment Type 1: Responding to Drama (30 %) Students attend a range of professional theatre experiences at the Adelaide Fringe, Adelaide Festival, State Theatre. They analyse, and reflect on the ideas, techniques, skills, choices, and artistic impact of a professional theatre on them as the audience and on their own individual development as an actor, designer or director.

Assessment Type 2: Company and Performance (40%) This is the performance component of the course and it involves working collaboratively to either devise creative works or develop performance work from established scripts. In creating a dramatic product, you will develop the skills and understandings to realise yourself as authentic artists – in on stage (actor) or off stage (director or designer) roles.

Assessment Type 3: Creative Synthesis; Drama and Technology (30%) Students choose to be either the director or designer of a hypothetical production and explore and experiment with possibilities for how they would use new technologies in their production.

Music - Music Experience

Duration: 
Full Year, Semester
Compulsory: 
No

This Music Experience program is designed for students with emerging musical skills. It provides opportunities for students to develop their musical understanding and skills in creating and responding to music.

Students explore and develop their practical music making skills through performance as a soloist or in an ensemble and are therefore required to continue or resume instrumental or vocal lessons. This course enables students to develop as practising musicians, and to develop in other areas of music in which they have a particular interest.

 Assessment

  • Arrangement/Composition Task
  • Performance Task
  • Responding to Musical Works Task
  • Music Performance Critique

Advice to students: It is highly advisable that students have completed music in Year 10 and that students have their own instrument so they can practice at home. Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

Visual Arts - Art

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

This course focuses on developing the student’s skills in a range of methods and materials. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and analyse works of Australian and International practitioners both past and present and use this as a foundation for their own major work. There is an emphasis on visual thinking and how students communicate their ideas, thought processes and responses throughout their learning.

This subject includes 3 areas of study:

  • Visual Thinking, developing the ability to view, understand, analyse and record ideas and thoughts.
  • Practical Resolution, students resolve, create, make and present finished art works.
  • Visual Art in Context, students learn to understand the historical, cultural and social circumstances which produce art in a community.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at stage 1 is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Assessment type 1: Folio
  • Assessment type 2: Practical
  • Assessment type 3: Visual Study

Visual Art - Design

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Specialise in Graphic Design, Digital Photography and the Digital Media Industry. Completion of Year 10 Design and Digital Media is recommended.

CONTENT

Students work as Designers. Students use software (Photoshop) to complete two major practical designs. They study photography and incorporate their work into a graphic design product. They use the Design Process and record all developmental work in folios. Students study the Digital Media Industry, including researching roles, jobs, and training.

Students gain an understanding of the Digital Media Industry by working with industry mentors.

ASSESSMENT

Practical Folios, assignments and homework tasks, practical demonstration of skills, self-assessment.

Visual Design and Creative Arts B

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: This is a second semester option for Visual Art Design students and Creative Arts, Media students. It is expected that students have undertaken Visual Art Design or Creative Arts Media in semester 1.

CONTENT: In this course students will build on skills, knowledge and understanding to produce Media Arts and Design Products/solutions leading to Stage 2 Design or Creative Arts. Students develop skills in communication and investigation of contemporary practitioners and media styles while applying a personal aesthetic to create digital solutions, arts products and advertising. Students use the creative process to produce completely original pieces of digital art, visual design and media products.

Topics covered in this course may include:

  • Manipulating and creating images and designs in Adobe Photoshop
  • Manipulating and creating moving image and digital content in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.
  • Using the design process

ASSESSMENT: Students are assessed against the Creative Arts SACE performance standards.

Practical assessment: 60%

Completed student practical works

Folio Assessment: 40%

  • Skill acquisition assignment
  • Research and analysis task on contemporary practitioners, media arts careers and pathways.

Business Innovation

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

In Stage 1 Business Innovation, students begin to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings to engage in business contexts in the modern world.

In a time when design-led companies outperform other companies, students are immersed in the process of finding and solving customer problems or needs through design thinking and using assumption-based planning tools. Students consider the opportunities and challenges associated with start-up and existing businesses in the modern, connected world. They consider how digital and emerging technologies may present opportunities to enhance business models and analyse the responsibilities and impacts of proposed business models on global and local communities.

This subject would suit students who are interested in starting their own small business.

Learning requirements:

In this subject, students are expected to:

  • explore problems and generate possible solutions to meet customer problems or needs using a customer-focused approach
  • develop and apply financial awareness and decision-making skills using assumption based planning tools
  • respond to and apply business and financial information to develop and communicate business models
  • analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of business models
  • explore and analyse opportunities presented by digital and emerging technologies in business contexts
  • apply communication and collaborative skills in business contexts.

For a semester course, each assessment type should have a weighting of at least 20%.

  • Assessment Type 1: Business Skills – Three business skills tasks, one of which is a business model summary.
  • Assessment Type 2: Business Pitch– One business pitch.

Digital Technology

Duration: 
Full Year, Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Students investigate existing Information Technology Systems to discover their operations, purpose & components. Students create practical, innovative solutions to problems of interest. By extracting, interpreting, and modelling real-world data sets, students identify trends to examine sustainable solutions to problems in, for example, business, industry, the environment and the community. They investigate how potential solutions are influenced by current and projected social, economic, environmental, scientific, and ethical considerations, including relevance, originality, appropriateness, and sustainability.

The learning requirements summarise the knowledge, skills, and understanding that students are expected to develop and demonstrate through their learning in Stage 1 Digital Technologies.

In this subject, students are expected to:

1. apply computational thinking skills to explore problems and possible solutions

2. develop and apply programming skills in creating digital solutions

3. analyse patterns and relationships in data sets and/or algorithms, and draw conclusions

4. develop and apply programdesign skills to create and evaluate digital solutions

5. research and discuss ethical considerations in digital technologies

6. work individually and collaboratively.

SACE ASSESSMENT

Assessment Type 1: Project Skills

Assessment Type 2: Digital Solution

Food and Hospitality

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

In Food and Hospitality, students focus on the dynamic nature of the food and hospitality industry. They develop an understanding of contemporary approaches and issues related to food and hospitality. Students work independently and collaboratively to achieve common goals. They develop skills and safe work practices in the preparation, storage and handling of food, complying with current health and safety legislation. Students investigate and debate contemporary food and hospitality issues and current management practices.
Students examine the factors that influence people’s food choices and the health implications of these choices. They understand the diverse purposes of the hospitality industry in meeting the needs of local people and visitors.

CONTENT
Students study topics within one or more of the following five areas of study:
• Food, the Individual and the Family
• Local and Global Issues in Food and Hospitality
• Trends in Food and Culture
• Food and Safety
• Food and Hospitality Industry

ASSESSMENT
Assessment of Stage 1 is school based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:
• Practical Activity
• Group Activity
• Investigation

For more information, please click link below:

Design & Technologies - Timber Focus

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Students use of a diverse range of manufacturing technologies such as tools, machines, and/or systems to create a product using appropriate materials. Students produce outcomes that demonstrate the knowledge and skills associated with using systems, processes, and materials such as metals, plastics, wood, composites, ceramics and textiles.

Learning requirements: In this subject, students engage in the design and realisation process and are expected to:

  1. review design features, processes, materials, and production techniques and apply creative thinking to the design of a solution
  2. plan and develop design concepts, and communicate potential features of — and solutions
    to — a problem or challenge
  3. apply knowledge and understanding of skills, engineering procedures, and techniques, using technology to realise the solution
  4. evaluate processes used in design development and solution realisation

research and discuss ethical, legal, economic, and/or sustainability issues related to technology, materials selected, processes used, and/or solution design

Design & Technology - Metal Focus

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Students use of a diverse range of manufacturing technologies such as tools, machines, and/or systems to create a product using appropriate materials. Students produce outcomes that demonstrate the knowledge and skills associated with using systems, processes, and materials such as metals, plastics, wood, composites, ceramics and textiles.

Learning requirements: In this subject, students engage in the design and realisation process and are expected to:

  1. review design features, processes, materials, and production techniques and apply creative thinking to the design of a solution
  2. plan and develop design concepts, and communicate potential features of — and solutions
    to — a problem or challenge
  3. apply knowledge and understanding of skills, engineering procedures, and techniques, using technology to realise the solution
  4. evaluate processes used in design development and solution realisation
  5. research and discuss ethical, legal, economic, and/or sustainability issues related to technology, materials selected, processes used, and/or solution design.

English

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
Yes

Stage 1 English is a compulsory subject and students must complete 20 credits or 2 semesters of either Stage 1 English or Stage 1 Essential English. Students who complete 20 credits of either of these subjects at C grade level will meet the Literacy requirements of the SACE. Stage 1 English will focus on all the basic English skills around responding to texts and creating texts. Each semester will also have a special intertextual study that will build students skills in comparing texts. Students critically and creatively engage with a variety of text types including novels, film, media, poetry and drama texts.

Stage 1 English can lead to continued study in any of the Stage 2 English subjects; English Literary Studies, English or Essential English.

Essential English

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
Yes

Essential English is an option for students to complete their literacy requirement as an alternative to English. This subject should not be chosen without consultation with a students Year 10 English Teacher and the English Coordinator as it will only lead to the Stage 2 Essential English course and not the other Stage 2 English classes.

This subject is designed for:

  • Students who are seeking to meet the SACE literacy requirements but are struggling with mainstream English
  • An English language development focus for students who are new arrivals in Australia
  • Students who are planning to pursue a career in a range of trades or vocational pathways. There is an emphasis on practical communication, comprehension, analysis and text creation.

 ASSESSMENT

Assessment will be according to the new SACE subject outline and aligned with the Australian Curriculum.

Child Studies

Duration: 
Compulsory: 
No

Child Studies is a SACE subject offered at Le Fevre High School at Stage 1 for full year. Within this course there are opportunities to develop a range of employability skills related to the care and development of children and it is highly linked to careers in Early Childhood.

The course focuses on children and their development from conception to 8 years of age and incorporates practical and theoretical activities, working individually and in groups. Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of young children through individual, collaborative, and practical learning.

They explore concepts such as the development, needs, and rights of children, the value of play, concepts of childhood and families, and the roles of parents and care-givers. Students have opportunities to build their understanding of the range of attitudes, values, and beliefs of people in the wider community in relation to children and child-rearing practices. They also consider the importance of behaviour management, child nutrition, and the health and well-being of children.

In a semester course, students provide evidence of their learning through 4 assessment tasks, which can be either a Practical Activity, Group Activity or Investigation.

  • Assessment Type 1: Practical Activity (50%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Group Activity (30%)
  • Assessment Type 3: Investigation (20%)

This course leads into Year 12 study of Stage 2 Child Studies (20 credits).

For more information, please click link below:

Health and Wellbeing

Duration: 
Compulsory: 
No

Having good health and wellbeing is crucial to quality of life and is a fundamental human right. Even though it is one of the most talked about topics, and is currently trending worldwide, our Health is too often not treated as a priority. Students develop the knowledge, skills and understandings required to explore and understand influences and make decisions regarding health and wellbeing. They consider the role of health and wellbeing in different contexts and explore ways of promoting positive outcomes for individuals, communities and global society.

Students learn strategies to improve their own mental/physical/emotional wellbeing and the community around them (practical and theory lessons). This course leads into Year 12 study of Stage 2 Health and Wellbeing (20 credits).

Health and Wellbeing covers four main concepts, and there are two types of assessments that students undertake, which include:

  • Practical Action (70%)
  • Issue Inquiry (30%)

Examples of practical activities could involve students developing exercise programs, exploring mental health benefits of meditation, and creating domestic violence action plans. Examples of the issue inquiry topics include homelessness, obesity, illicit drugs, racism, body image, addiction, and mental health.

There are many areas of interest that Health and Wellbeing explores, and possible career pathways from this course could lead to health services, research, psychology, teaching or sport science.

For more information, please click link below:

Outdoor Education

Duration: 
Compulsory: 
No

Outdoor Education gives students the opportunity to extend their learning outside of the classroom by engaging in a range of learning experiences that challenge them. The Stage 1 Outdoor Education program is designed to provide you with both individual and group responsibility and resilience in the outdoor setting.  The aims of the course are to develop group dynamics, teamwork, communication, leadership skills and to develop necessary knowledge and understanding around planning adventurous journeys.

The course is offered in two semesters, but students can elect to do full year course or select the semester that best suits their interest.

Semester 1 – Bushwalking focus with an aquatics excursion

Semester 2 – Aquatics Focus with Bushwalking excursion

It is recommended that students have already completed the Year 10 Outdoor Education course before doing Year 11 but is not mandatory to go into this course. Three interrelated Focus Areas provide the subject content:

  • Focus Area 1 – Environment and conservation
  • Focus Area 2 – Planning and management
  • Focus Area 3 – Personal and social growth and development

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria on the following:

  • Assessment Task 1 – About Natural Environments – 1600 words. Students explore human interactions with natural environments and the balance between human use, potential risks, and conservation and sustainability of the environment.
  • Assessment Task 2 – Experiences in Natural Environments – 1600 words. Students will understand the requirement of experiences in natural environments. Students plan and undertake outdoor activities as a group and develop team work and practical outdoor skills

Please note, an additional fee of $200.00 (GST free) per semester is required for student’s participation in this course, which includes students’ camp fees and excursions.

For more information, please click link below:

Physical Education

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Through Physical Education, students explore the participation in and performance of human physical activities. It is an experiential subject in which students explore their physical capacities and investigate the factors that influence and improve participation and performance outcomes, which lead to greater movement confidence and competence. An integrated approach to learning in Physical Education supports an educational framework that promotes deep learning ‘in, through and about’ physical activity. Physical activities can include sports, theme-based games, fitness and recreational activities.

Topics that are undertaken include:

Focus Area 1: In movement

  • Skill Acquisition
  • Movement concepts and strategies
  • Energy Sources Affecting Performance
  • Effects of training on physical performance

Focus Area 2: Through movement

  • Barriers and enablers to participation
  • Social strategies to manipulate equity in participation
  • Personal influences.

Focus Area 3: About movement

  • The body’s response to physical activity
  • The effect of training on the body
  • Learning and refining skills

The focus areas provide the narrative for the knowledge, skills and capabilities that students develop. Learning is delivered through an integrated approach in which opportunities are provided for students to undertake and learn through a wide range of authentic physical activities (e.g. sports, theme-based games, laboratories and fitness and recreational activities). Students explore movement concepts and strategies through these activities to promote participation and performance outcomes. The use of technology is integral to the collection of data such as video footage, heart rates, fitness batteries, and game statistics. Students apply their understanding of movement concepts to evaluate the data and reflect on ways in which performance can be achieved.

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria based on the learning requirements and performance standards describing their level of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

Assessment Type 1: Improvement Analysis

Assessment Type 2: Physical Activity Investigation For more information, please click link below:

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

The Specialist Football Program enables students with a passion for soccer to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in all aspects of football including playing, rules, tactics, fitness components and training principles. Students within the program are given the opportunity to receive specialist skills coaching, fitness development and participation in statewide soccer competitions. Topics covered in this course include:

  • Skill and Performance development
  • Performance Analysis
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition for Football
  • Injury Prevention and Management
  • Coaching and Refereeing

Specialist Football at year 11 is run as a SACE subject of Integrated Learning and students gain 10 SACE credits within each semester studied. The school assessment component for Stage 1 Integrated Learning consists of three assessment types:

Assessment Type 1: Practical Exploration

Assessment Type 2: Connections

Assessment Type 3: Personal Venture

For more information, please click link below:

Aboriginal Studies

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

In Aboriginal Studies, students learn from and with Aboriginal peoples, communities, and other sources of Aboriginal voice. Learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities is integral to students developing and extending respectful ways of thinking, communicating, understanding, and acting. Through their learning in this subject, students draw on elements of history, sociology, politics, arts, and literature.

Students acknowledge and extend their understanding of the narratives and accomplishments as told by Aboriginal peoples and reflect on the impact of past events on the present. They develop respect for what narratives and accomplishments mean to different Aboriginal peoples and communities.

Students analyse the historical and contemporary experiences that are of significance to Aboriginal peoples and communities. They examine the intergenerational influence and impact of government policies, past and present, on the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal peoples and communities today. Students investigate experiences of ongoing resistance and survival and learn about initiatives and accomplishments developed in response to these experiences.

Diversity is at the heart of learning in Aboriginal Studies. Students develop their understanding of the diversity of Aboriginal peoples’ identities and experiences, including cultural, political, linguistic, and contextual diversity. They acknowledge and extend their understanding of the diversity and the historical, social, and political importance of Aboriginal cultural expressions, and learn from a wide range of cultural expressions including painting, music, performance, literature, and oral traditions.

Students engage in learning from and with Aboriginal peoples and communities to develop respect for and awareness of the diversity of the experiences of Aboriginal peoples and communities. They develop and extend their respect for, and understanding of cultural protocols, and reflect on the diversity of cultures. They develop respectful ways of thinking, listening, communicating, and acting.

In this subject, ‘Aboriginal peoples’ refers to all Indigenous peoples of Australia.

Students who complete Aboriginal Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Aboriginal Studies, Modern History, Legal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

ASSESSMENT

  • Assessment Type 1: Learning Journey   (3 Tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Creative Presentation. (1 Task)

Ancient Studies

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Students learn about the history, literature, society and culture of ancient civilisations, which may include Asia-Australia, the Americas, Europe and Western Asia, and the classical civilisations of Greece and Rome.

Students will consider the environmental, social, economic, religious, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of societies. They will also then look at their impact on history, the present day and the lessons that can be learnt from these ancient cultures.

This subject has one compulsory topic and five additional topics to choose from.

Compulsory topic

  • Topic 1: Understanding ancient history.
    • In this topic students will learn about the practicalities of being an ancient historian and the processes and practices of examining the ancient past.

Additional topics

  • Topic 2: Art, architecture, and technology
  • Topic 3: Warfare and conquest
  • Topic 4: Social structures, slavery, and everyday life
  • Topic 5: Beliefs, rituals, and mythology
  • Topic 6: Creative representations.

Students who complete Ancient Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Modern History, Aboriginal Studies, Legal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

ASSESSMENT

  • Assessment Type 1: Skills and Applications (3 tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Inquiry (1 task)

Gender Studies

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Stage 1 Gender Studies offers a way of identifying and describing aspects of women’s lives, and critically assessing the institutions and ideas of societies and cultures from a gender perspective. The basic Women’s Studies concepts are gender and identity. These two concepts enable students to understand and analyse femininity and masculinity and the relationship between women’s identity and men’s identity. 

Gender identity is discussed as a broad and dynamic theme with both personal and political implications and can be understood as:

  • a personal and a group experience
  • constructed in social institutions
  • existing in a diversity of contexts
  • a citizenship issue.

This subject challenge the social and cultural constructions of femininity and masculinity that extend beyond biological capacity, and then move beyond these stereotypes to develop strategies for recognising women and women’s experiences as significant and as distinct from men’s experiences. You will also explore women’s historical and, in some contexts, continuing exclusion from the entitlements of citizenship, and the strategies, campaigns, and programs developed to promote inclusion.

 ASSESSMENT

  • at least one text analysis assessment
  • at least one group presentation
  • one issues analysis assessment.

Students who complete Gender Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Women’s Studies, Modern History, Legal Studies, Aboriginal Studies and Society & Culture.  

Legal Studies

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Legal Studies explores Australia’s legal heritage and the dynamic nature of the Australian legal system within a global context. Students are provided with an understanding of the structures of the Australian legal system and how that system responds and contributes to social change while acknowledging tradition.

The study of Legal Studies provides insight into law-making and the processes of dispute resolution and the administration of justice. Students investigate legal perspectives on contemporary issues in society. They reflect on, and make informed judgments about, strengths and weaknesses of the Australian legal system. Students consider how, and to what degree, these weaknesses may be remedied.

CONTENT

  • Topic 1: Law and Society

Plus a minimum of two other topics from below:

  • Topic 1:    People, Structures and Processes
  • Topic 2:    Law-making
  • Topic 3:    Justice and Society
  • Topic 4:    Young People and the Law
  • Topic 5:    Victims and the Law
  • Topic 6:    Motorists and the Law
  • Topic 7:    Young Workers and the Law
  • Topic 8:    Relationships and the Law

Alternative topics can also be developed

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Folio
  • Issues Study
  • Presentation

Students who complete Legal Studies in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Legal Studies, Modern History, Aboriginal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies.  

Modern History

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

In the study of Modern History, at Stage1, students explore changes within the world since 1750, examining developments and movements of significance, the ideas that inspired them, and their short and long term consequences on societies, systems and individuals.

Students explore the impact that these developments and movements had on people’s ideas, perspectives, and circumstances. They investigate ways in which people, groups and institutions challenge structures, social organisations and economic models to transform societies.

Topics that could be covered [2 will be selected]

  • Imperialism
  • Decolonisation
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Social Movements
  • Revolution
  • Elective

ASSESSMENT

  • 3 Assignments tasks examining historical skills
  • 1 Independent Historical Study

Students who complete Modern History in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Modern History, Legal Studies, Aboriginal Studies, Society & Culture and Women’s Studies. 

Society & Culture

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

This subject allows students to explore and analyse the interactions of people, societies, cultures, and environments. Using an interdisciplinary approach, they analyse the structures and systems of contemporary societies and cultures.

The course is always changing, as the world is always changing. In the past students have explored the following:

  • Youth Culture- film study, which looked at the changing nature of youth culture in Australia
  • Investigation of the Port River dolphins and management strategies surrounding them. Included an excursion to Garden Island and heard from a member of the Australasian Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC) Board
  • Group investigation of a global issue

Students will develop the following skills in this course:

  • Research
  • Exploring different perspectives
  • Report writing
  • Referencing
  • Conducting surveys and interviews

ASSESSMENT

  • at least one sources analysis assessment
  • at least one group activity
  • at least one investigation.

Students who complete Society & Culture in Stage 1 will develop skills that can lead them to study any of the Humanities subjects in Stage 2 such as: Society & Culture, Modern History, Legal Studies, Aboriginal Studies and Women’s Studies.  

Indonesian

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

(The 10 credit option should not be selected without a discussion with the Language Coordinator) NB: re: eligibility. To ensure student success in this subject a passing grade in Yr. 10 Indonesian is required.

CONTENT

Stage 1 Indonesian consists of three themes each with a number of topics and sub-topics. Themes:

  • The Individual (eg sport and recreation, personal world)
  • The Indonesian-speaking Communities (eg visiting Indonesia, religion, gender)
  • The Changing World (eg environment, youth issues)

Through these themes, the students develop a deeper understanding and confidence in their knowledge and expression of Indonesian, preparing them well for Stage 2 and beyond.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school-based. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Interaction (both written and oral interaction)
  • Text Production (both written and spoken pieces are produced)
  • Text Analysis (both written and oral texts are checked for comprehension)
  • Investigation (researching then presenting on a topic)

Essential Mathematics

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
Yes

Essential Mathematics is designed for a range of students, including those who are seeking to meet the SACE numeracy requirement, and students who are planning to pursue a career in a range of trades or vocational pathways. There is an emphasis on extending students' mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem-solving in everyday and workplace contexts, in flexible and resourceful ways.

Students who study Essential Mathematics in Stage 1 are unable to study a Mathematics course in Stage 2. Students intending to study Stage 2 General Mathematics must undertake 20 credits of General Mathematics at Stage 1.

Recommended background

Students in Stage 1 study one of three levels of Mathematics. A students Year 10 results and teachers recommendation should be considered when deciding which level to select.

A student working below standard (a D or E grade) in Year 10 Mathematics should select Essential Mathematics. Students working at standard (a C grade) may select General Mathematics or Essential Mathematics. Students working above standard (an A or B grade) can select General Mathematics, though should select Mathematical Methods if they have career aspirations that requires high level Mathematical knowledge.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Essential Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Calculations, Time and Ratio
  • Earning and Spending
  • Geometry

Semester 2

  • Data in Context
  • Measurement
  • Investing

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Mathematical Folios (investigations and research tasks)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Essential Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Calculations, Time and Ratio assignment (SAT)
  • Geometry and Construction assignment (SAT)
  • Ratio and Scale investigation (IF)
  • Financial Mathematics investigation (IF)

Semester 2

  • Data in Context topic test (SAT)
  • Data in Context investigation (IF)
  • Measurement investigation (IF)
  • Investing topic test (SAT)

Stage 1 Essential Mathematics is assessed using two criteria:

  • Concepts and Techniques
    • This criterion assesses students knowledge and understanding of mathematical information and knowledge, their application of mathematical skills, gathering, representing and interpreting data and using technology to find solutions to practical problems.
  • Reasoning and Communication
    • This criterion assesses students ability to interpret mathematical results, their reasoning when drawing conclusions and ability to consider appropriateness of their solutions, correct use of mathematics notation, representations and information, and their communication of ideas and information.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: students receiving their SACE Numeracy credits. There are no Mathematics courses available at Stage 2 for students who study Essential Mathematics in Stage 1.

SACE requires all students to achieve a C grade or higher in one semester of any Mathematics course in Stage 1. Students who are successful have the option to choose to select an alternative elective in semester 2 or continue with a second semester of Mathematics. Students who are not successful must study a second semester of Mathematics

General Mathematics

Duration: 
Full Year, Semester
Compulsory: 
Yes

General Mathematics is designed for students to develop a broad range of quantitative skills to support them in fields such as business, commerce or the trades. The course introduces students to a personal financial management, the statistical investigation process, and modelling of the real world using lines, networks and matrices.

Recommended background

Students in Stage 1 study one of three levels of Mathematics. A students Year 10 results and teachers recommendation should be considered when deciding which level to select.

A student working below standard (a D or E grade) in Year 10 Mathematics should select Essential Mathematics. Students working at standard (a C grade) may select General Mathematics or Essential Mathematics. Students working above standard (an A or B grade) can select General Mathematics, though should select Mathematical Methods if they have career aspirations that requires high level Mathematical knowledge.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 General Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Investing and Borrowing
  • Measurement
  • Statistical Investigation

Semester 2

  • Applications of Trigonometry
  • Linear and Exponential Functions
  • Matrices and Networks

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Mathematical Folios (investigations and research tasks)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 General Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Measurement topic test (SAT)
  • Investing and Borrowing topic test (SAT)
  • Bank Interest investigation (IF)
  • Statistical investigation (IF)

Semester 2

  • Applications of Trigonometry topic test (SAT)
  • Matrices and Network topic test (SAT)
  • Networks investigation (IF)
  • Linear and Exponential Functions topic test (SAT)

Stage 1 General Mathematics is assessed using two criteria:

  • Concepts and Techniques
    • This criterion assesses students knowledge and understanding of mathematical information and knowledge, their application of mathematical skills, gathering, representing and interpreting data and using technology to find solutions to practical problems.
  • Reasoning and Communication
    • This criterion assesses students ability to interpret mathematical results, their reasoning when drawing conclusions and ability to consider appropriateness of their solutions, correct use of mathematics notation, representations and information, and their communication of ideas and information.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 General Mathematics

Students who intend to study General Mathematics at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods.

SACE requires all students to achieve a C grade or higher in one semester of any Mathematics course in Stage 1. Students who are successful have the option to choose to select an alternative elective in semester 2 or continue with a second semester of Mathematics. Students who are not successful must study a second semester of Mathematics.

Mathematical Methods

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
Yes

Mathematical Methods provides the necessary background for students wishing study tertiary courses with significant mathematical content like Aviation, Architecture, Engineering or the Physical Sciences.

A student studying Specialist Mathematics must also select Mathematical Methods.

A Graphics Calculator (ideally CASIO 9860 series) is required. These are available for loan through the school.

Recommended background

Students in Stage 1 study one of three levels of Mathematics. A students Year 10 results and teachers recommendation should be considered when deciding which level to select.

A student working below standard (a D or E grade) in Year 10 Mathematics should select Essential Mathematics. Students working at standard (a C grade) may select General Mathematics or Essential Mathematics. Students working above standard (an A or B grade) can select General Mathematics, though should select Mathematical Methods if they have career aspirations that requires high level Mathematical knowledge.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Mathematical Methods.

Semester 1

  • Functions and Graphs
  • Polynomials and Quadratics
  • Trigonometry

Semester 2

  • Counting and Statistics
  • Growth and Decay
  • Introduction to Differential Calculus

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school- based and subject to moderation.

There are two assessment types:

  • Mathematical Folios (investigations and research tasks)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 General Mathematics.

Semester 1

  • Functions and Graphs topic test (SAT)
  • Polynomials topic test (SAT)
  • Polynomials investigation (IF)
  • Trigonometry topic test (SAT)

Semester 2

  • Counting and Statistics topic test (SAT)
  • Growth and Decay topic test (SAT)
  • Introduction to Calculus topic test (SAT)
  • Modelling With Derivatives investigation (IF)

Stage 1 Mathematical Methods is assessed using two criteria:

  • Concepts and Techniques
    • This criterion assesses students knowledge and understanding of mathematical information and knowledge, their application of mathematical skills, gathering, representing and interpreting data and using technology to find solutions to practical problems.
  • Reasoning and Communication
    • This criterion assesses students ability to interpret mathematical results, their reasoning when drawing conclusions and ability to consider appropriateness of their solutions, correct use of mathematics notation, representations and information, and their communication of ideas and information.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Mathematical Methods or Stage 2 General Mathematics

Students who intend to study Mathematics Methods at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods. Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Mathematical Methods as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

SACE requires all students to achieve a C grade or higher in one semester of any Mathematics course in Stage 1. Students who are successful have the option to choose to select an alternative elective in semester 2 or continue with a second semester of Mathematics. Students who are not successful must study a second semester of Mathematics.

Research Project

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
Yes

The Research Project is a compulsory subject of the South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE). This is a Stage 2 subject, studied in Year 11 at Le Fevre High School. The term ‘research’ is used broadly and may include practical or technical investigations, formal research, or exploratory enquiries. Students choose a topic of interest – it may be linked to a SACE subject or course, or to a workplace or community context. It could be an idea or issue, a technical or practical challenge, an artefact, a problem, or a research question. They work independently and with others to initiate an idea, and to plan and manage a research project. Students learn and apply research processes and the knowledge and skills specific to their research topic. They analyse information and explore ideas to develop their research and record, communicate and evaluate their research outcome. Students will be enrolled in Research Project A or B after consultation with the learning area coordinator.

CONTENT

Capabilities:In their Research Project students must demonstrate one or more capability relevant to their research from the following list: Literacy, Numeracy, ICT capability, creative and critical thinking, personal and social capability, ethical understanding and intercultural understanding. They show how this capability is developed through their research.

Research framework: Students follow the research framework below as a guide in completing the work.

  • Initiating, planning, and managing the research
  • Carrying out the research
  • Communicating the research outcome
  • Evaluating the research.

ASSESSMENT

School-based assessment:                                     

  • Folio (preliminary ideas and research proposal, research development, discussion) 30%
  • Research outcome 40%

External assessment:

  • Evaluation (including written summary) 30%

Biology

Duration: 
Full Year, Semester
Compulsory: 
No

The study of Biology is constructed around inquiry into and application of understanding the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments. By investigating biological systems and their interactions, from the perspectives of energy, control, structure and function, change, and exchange in microscopic cellular structures and processes through to macroscopic ecosystem dynamics, students extend the skills, knowledge, and understanding that enable them to explore and explain everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues, and understand how biological science impacts on their lives, society, and the environment. They apply their understanding of the interconnectedness of biological systems to evaluate the impact of human activity on the natural world.

Recommended background: IBMYP level 5 or higher in the Year 10 Science biological science units.

CONTENT

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Biology:

Semester 1

Cells and Microorganisms
Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics

Semester 2

Infectious Disease
Multicellular Organisms

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Investigations Folios (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Biology.

Semester 1

Osmosis practical report (IF)

The study of Biology is constructed around inquiry into and application of understanding the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments. By investigating biological systems and their interactions, from the perspectives of energy, control, structure and function, change, and exchange in microscopic cellular structures and processes through to macroscopic ecosystem dynamics, students extend the skills, knowledge, and understanding that enable them to explore and explain everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues, and understand how biological science impacts on their lives, society, and the environment. They apply their understanding of the interconnectedness of biological systems to evaluate the impact of human activity on the natural world.

Recommended background

Working at or above standard (a C grade or better) in the Year 10 Science Biology units.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Biology:

Semester 1

  • Cells and Microorganisms
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics

Semester 2

  • Infectious Disease
  • Multicellular Organisms

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Investigations Folios (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Biology.

Semester 1

  • Osmosis practical report (IF)
  • Cells and Microorganisms topic test (SAT)
  • Keystone Species SHE investigation (IF)
  • Ecosystems and Biodiversity topic test (SAT)

Semester 2

  • Disease Spread and Prevention SHE investigation (IF)
  • Infectious Disease topic test (SAT)
  • Enzymes practical report (IF)
  • Multicellular Organism topic test (SAT)

Stage 1 Biology is assessed using two criteria:

  • Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation
    • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.
  • Knowledge and Application
    • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall Biological information, to use Biological terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Biology

Students who intend to study Biology at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Biology with a C grade or better.

Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Biology as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.


Cells and Microorganisms topic test (SAT)
Keystone Species SHE investigation (IF)
Ecosystems and Biodiversity topic test (SAT)

Semester 2

Disease Spread and Prevention SHE investigation (IF)
Infectious Disease topic test (SAT)
Enzymes practical report (IF)
Multicellular Organism topic test (SAT)

Stage 1 Biology is assessed using two criteria:

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

  • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.

Knowledge and Understanding

  • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall Biological information, to use Biological terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

Successful completion of this subject leads to Stage 2 Biology

 Students who intend to study Biology at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Biology. Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Biology as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

Chemistry

Duration: 
Full Year, Semester
Compulsory: 
No

In their study of Chemistry, students develop and extend their understanding of how the physical world is chemically constructed, the interaction between human activities and the environment, and the use that human beings make of the planet’s resources. They explore examples of how scientific understanding is dynamic and develops with new evidence, which may involve the application of new technologies. Students consider examples of benefits and risks of chemical knowledge to the wider community, along with the capacity of chemical knowledge to inform public debate on social and environmental issues. The study of Chemistry helps students to make informed decisions about interacting with and modifying nature, and explore options such as green or sustainable chemistry, which seeks to reduce the environmental impact of chemical products and processes.

Recommended background

Working at or above standard (a C grade or better) in the Year 10 Science Chemistry units. Strong mathematical skills are expected.

Content
The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Chemistry.

Semester 1

  • Materials and their Atoms
  • Combinations of Atoms
  • Acid and Bases

Semester 2

  • Molecules
  • Mixtures and Solutions
  • Redox Reaction

Assessment
Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Investigations Folios (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Application Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Chemistry.

Semester 1

  • Acid rain practical report (IF)
  • Fundamentals of Chemistry test (SAT)
  • Uses of nanotechnology SHE investigation (IF)
  • Interactions of molecules test (SAT)

Semester 2

  • Uses of polymers SHE investigation (IF)
  • Qualitative Chemistry test (SAT)
  • Thermochemistry practical report (IF)
  • Redox reactions test (SAT)

Stage 1 Chemistry is assessed using two criteria:

  • Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation
    • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.
  • Knowledge and Application
    • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall chemical information, to use chemical terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Chemistry

Students who intend to study Chemistry at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Chemistry with a C grade or better.

Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Chemistry as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

Forensic Science

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Scientific Studies develops students knowledge of scientific principles and concepts related to Forensic Science, the ability to use that knowledge to identify questions, issues, opportunities and challenges, and the capacity to acquire new knowledge through their own investigations. They develop the skills and abilities to explain scientific phenomena, and to draw evidence-based conclusions from the investigation of science-related issues. In this way, students develop scientific knowledge and skills to support them in their future career pathways, including those that are science-related, and everyday life in a world shaped by science and technology.

Recommended background

Scientific Studies is an excellent choice for students who have enjoyed their science courses in high school but do not intend to specialise in a specific Science subject at the SACE level.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Forensic Science.

  • Introduction to Forensics
  • Physical Evidence
  • Hair and Fibres
  • Fingerprints
  • Forensic Anthropology
  • Blood and other sources of DNA
  • Blood Splatter

Assessment

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

There are two assessment types:

  • Inquiry Folios (Science as a Human Endeavour investigation and Science Inquiry Skills tasks)
  • Collaborative Inquiry (Investigation Design and Evaluation)

Four assessment pieces are completed in Forensic Science.

  • A SHE investigation on a topic of the students choice (IF)
  • A case study on the forensic techniques used in a real-life crime (IF)
  • A practical report (IF)
  • Forensic Anthropology collaborative investigation (CI)

Stage 1 Scientific Studies- Forensic Science is assessed using two criteria:

  • Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation
    • This criterion assesses students’ ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.
  • Knowledge and Application
    • This criterion assesses students’ ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall scientific information, to use scientific terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: an improved understanding of some Biology content which may be beneficial. Students who intend to study Biology at Stage 2 may benefit from selecting this subject alongside a full year of Stage 1 Biology, though Forensic Science is not compulsory.

Naval Engineering - Integrated Learning

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

This hands-on STEM course (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) split in Semester 1 and Semester 2, is suitable for students who are interested in Applied Science, Engineering and Technology. In this course, Applied Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics are used to explore and explain current scientific issues in primarily a Maritime environment. Through these two Semesters, students become aware of the significance of Mathematics and Science to address a range of Engineering challenges. The Science and Mathematics studied also relate to many vocational pathways.

This course centres on personal and group research activities as well as practical exercises of design, construction and use of models to test theories, by using Mathematics, Science and CNC Laser cutting technology.

Although it is possible to choose only one semester, this choice will give students only 10 SACE credits/points. To get the full complement of 20 SACE Credits (10+10), and if students intend to choose Advanced Naval Engineering at a Stage 2 Level (year 12), it is highly recommended that students choose to do semester 1 and 2 (full year) at Stage 1 (year 11) level to get the full knowledge of the Curriculum in preparation for Advanced Naval Engineering at a Stage 2 level.

CONTENT ( 10 + 10 SACE credits )

Semester 1 ( 10 SACE Credits )

  • Density – Mass, Volume and applications of Density
  • Archimedes Principle applied to Submarines and Submersible structures
  • Displacement and waterlines
  • The STEM of Marine Propellers (Cavitation) and of Aviation propellers, Aircraft, Helicopters and Drones. Students will learn how to fly a helicopter (Huey) in a VR (Virtual Reality) environment by using DCS software and a VR headset.
  • STEM and Cultural Study of Boomerangs
  • Current Applications of Submarine Technology
  • Future designs for Deep Sea exploration

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to study Submarines, Buoyancy, Density, Strobe lights and Synchronicity, Rotational and Linear Speeds of Propellers, Boomerangs (students make their own), Rotors, Helicopters and Drones.

 ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Density, Archimedes Principle and Buoyancy in Submarines – STEM of propellers and Boomerangs, cavitation, helicopters and drones.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of submarine technology relating to the course and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Venture – Research: Students produce an essay about a chosen topic and are invited to reflect on their learning experience.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this course.

  • Practical Inquiries 40 %
  • Connections Task – Group Activity 30 %
  • Personal Venture 30 %

Semester 2 ( 10 SACE Credits )

  • Aerodynamic and Hydrodynamic principles
  • Theory of lift and drag applied to wings and sails
  • Surface to mass ratio of aircraft and its influence on the gliding ratio of planes
  • Hydrodynamics principles applied to hydrofoil technology
  • Application to control surfaces found in submarines and aircrafts. Students will learn how to fly an F/A 18 Super Hornet fighter plane in a VR (Virtual Reality) environment by using DCS software and a VR headset.
  • Physics of sail boats: Hull Stability and Aerodynamics in sails
  • Past, Current and Future Techniques used to harness the wind to propel marine vessels
  • Aerodynamics and stability of land yachts applied to building a full-scale land yacht.

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to study the Physics of Sail boats, Aircraft and Wing physics, as well as  Foil riding powered and sailing vessels. Students will also have the opportunity to design and build gliders to test their knowledge of Aerodynamics as well as testing remote land-yacht models. Time permitting, student will also design and build a full-scale land-yacht and test it on the basketball court to illustrate sail navigation principles. In the process, they will study the Physics Principles of Forces, Pulleys and Winch technology.

ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Aerodynamic principles applied to glider design, Hydrodynamic principles applied to hydrofoil technology, wing surface to mass ratio relating to aircraft performance, Physics of Control Surfaces applied to VR F/A 18 flying, multiplication of forces and pulley technology. Land-yachts Technology.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of Sail/Aviation Technology and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Venture – Research:  Students produce an essay about a chosen topic relating to the course and are invited to reflect on their learning experience.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this course.

  • Practical Inquiries 40 %
  • Connections Task – Group Activity 30 %
  • Personal Venture 30 %

Physics

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

The study of Physics is constructed around using qualitative and quantitative models, laws, and theories to better understand matter, forces, energy, and the interaction among them. Physics seeks to explain natural phenomena, from the subatomic world to the macro cosmos, and to make predictions about them. The models, laws, and theories in physics are based on evidence obtained from observations, measurements, and active experimentation over thousands of years. In Physics, students integrate and apply a range of understanding, inquiry, and scientific thinking skills that encourage and inspire them to contribute their own solutions to current and future problems and challenges. Students also pursue scientific pathways, for example, in engineering, renewable energy generation, communications, materials innovation, transport and vehicle safety, medical science, scientific research, and the exploration of the universe.

Recommended background

Working at or above standard (a C grade or better) in the Year 10 Science Physic units.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 1 Physics:

Semester 1

  • Linear Motion and Forces
  • Energy and Momentum
  • Heat

Semester 2

  • Electricity
  • Waves
  • Nuclear Models and Radioactivity

Assessment           

Assessment at Stage 1 is school based.

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Investigations Folio (practical investigations and Science as a Human Endeavour investigations)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (topic tests)

Four assessment pieces are completed in each semester of Stage 1 Physics.

Semester 1

  • Parachute design investigation (IF)
  • Linear Motion and Forces topic test (SAT)
  • Importance of Space Flight SHE investigation (IF)
  • Rocket Science presentation (SAT)

Semester 2

  • Radiotracers SHE investigation (IF)
  • Medical Imaging topic test (SAT)
  • Energy practical report (IF)
  • Medical Physics topic test (SAT)

Stage 1 Physics is assessed using two criteria:

  • Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation
    • This criterion assesses students ability to research relevant information, to deconstruct problems, design investigations, test hypotheses, identify variables, consider possible risks, create tables and graphs, analyse data and evaluate results.
  • Knowledge and Application
    • This criterion assesses students ability to understand science as a human endeavour, to recall physics-related information, to use physics terminology and use their knowledge in unfamiliar situations.

A Course Overview, outlining the specific criteria assessed for each task, can be provided upon request.

Successful completion of this subject leads to: Stage 2 Physics

Students who intend to study Physics at Stage 2: must complete 20 credits of Stage 1 Physics.

Students should investigate whether tertiary study requires Stage 2 Physics as a prerequisite or assumed knowledge.

Certificate 2 Engineering Pathways

Duration: 
Compulsory: 
No

South Australia is the national centre of naval shipbuilding and submarine sustainment, and the confirmed location for Australia’s next generation Future Submarines and Future Frigates. This course aims to provide students with skills and competencies required in Engineering Trades that will be in high demand. Students will learn skills that are applicable to a range of engineering trades, as well as required theory. Oxy/Acetylene and MMA welding techniques are used. Projects, design work and testing are integral components of the course. Students will be supported by local industry partnerships for visits and workplace learning.

This course may lead to an Engineering Trades, Fabrication, Mechanical Fitter, Automotive, Diesel, Ship Building, Plumbing or Electrical Apprenticeship. It may also lead to Diploma or Advanced Diploma in Engineering or Bachelor Degree in Engineering. The maritime content will highlight the history of both the school and the region in providing a highly skilled workforce for the maritime and allied industries.

Students can then progress to studying a Certificate 3 Engineering as a part school based apprenticeship, gaining recognition towards their SACE. For more information on school based apprenticeships please visit https://www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/school-based-apprenticeships

Certificate 2 Kitchen Operations

Duration: 
Compulsory: 
No

This qualification reflects the role of individuals working in kitchens who use a defined and limited range of food preparation and cookery skills to prepare food and menu items. They are involved in mainly routine and repetitive tasks and work under direct supervision. This qualification does not provide the skills required by commercial cooks, which are covered in SIT30816 Certificate III in Commercial Cookery.

This qualification provides a pathway to work in kitchen operations in organisations such as restaurants, hotels, catering operations, clubs, pubs, cafés, and coffee shops; and institutions such as aged care facilities, hospitals, prisons, and schools.

Possible job titles include:

  •          breakfast cook
  •          catering assistant
  •          fast food cook
  •          sandwich hand
  •          takeaway cook

Students can then progress to studying a Certificate 3 Kitchen Operations as a part of their year 12 studies and/or move into a school based apprenticeship. For more information on school based apprenticeships please visit https://www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/school-based-apprenticeships

Certificate 2 Maritime Industries

Duration: 
Compulsory: 
No

This is an entry level course that will provide students with maritime skills and knowledge to enable them to be immediately employable as Deck Hands as well as giving them significant credit in a Coxswain course. This will be able to be completed once students have gained sufficient documented time at sea.

This qualification will assist students to fast track their maritime career in either marine engineering or as a deck officer. The units of competency completed during this course will gain credit toward a Coxswain qualification. This can be completed when students reach the age of 18 and have spent sufficient time at sea.

Workplace Practices

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
No

Workplace Practices at Stage 1 allows learners to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of industry and work.  Students develop and apply relevant work skills, identify, and investigate processes and issues related to work, industry, and the workplace.  They may work independently or with others and review, reflect and report on their experiences, abilities, interests, and aspirations in relation to planning for work and future pathways.

Students who select to do a VET Flexible Industry Pathway course will automatically be enrolled in this course to support their vocational learning and identified career pathway.

Content

Workplace Practices is a 10 credit subject at Stage 1. It has three areas of study:

Industry and Work Knowledge, Vocational learning and/or VET

Industry and Work Knowledge

Students develop knowledge and understanding of the nature, type, and structure of the workplace. Specific areas include the changing nature of work; industrial relations and legislation; safe and sustainable workplace practices; technical and industry-related skills; and issues in industry and workplace contexts.

For a 10‑credit subject, students undertake two or more topics.

Vocational Learning

Vocational learning is general learning that has a vocational perspective. It includes any formal learning in a work-related context outside Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) qualifications. Students undertake learning in the workplace to develop and reflect on their capabilities, interests, and aspirations and to reflect on the knowledge, skills, and attributes valued in the workplace.

Vocational Education and Training (VET)

VET includes any ‘training and assessment delivered by a registered training organisation which meets the requirements specified in national industry/enterprise Training Packages or in accredited courses’ (training.gov.au).

ASSESSMENT

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School-based Assessment

  • Folio 40%
  • Performance 40%
  • Reflection 20%

THRIVE • RESPECT • INTEGRITY

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