Learn more about the subjects available below.

Activating Identities and Futures

Duration: 
Semester
Compulsory: 
Yes

Beginning in 2025, Activating Identities and Futures (AIF) will replace Research Project at Stage 2.   Students who achieve a ‘C’ grade or better in the subject will be awarded 10 SACE credits.  AIF is a compulsory subject and is a requirement for SACE achievement.

Course Description

Activating Identities and Futures is a 10-credit subject at Stage 2. Activating Identities and Futures aims to foster independent learning and the skills of lifelong learning in students. The belief that students have the ability and the will to positively influence their own lives and the world around them is integral to the course. This subject supports students to be more proactive and reflective in their learning and to develop and use a broad set of transferable learning strategies.

Activating Identities and Futures requires students to take greater ownership and agency over their learning as they select, test, and explore relevant strategies and perspectives in the pursuit of a Learning Goal of their choice. They seek feedback on their learning processes, become metacognitive about their thinking, and make informed decisions to enhance their learning.

Course Content

Each student will have a different learning journey that they tailor to their Learning Goal. Approaches, contexts, and strategies will vary to suit the individual student. Students showcase the achievement of their Learning Goal with an Output of Learning. An Output of Learning, for example, could be a plan for future action, a proposal for a service or social enterprise, an oral explanation, a demonstration of a skill, or a completed product such as an artwork, report, academic article, or short video.

Both the Learning Goal and the Output of Learning need to have purpose and value for the student, others, and/or the broader community. Students will develop greater awareness and understanding of their own thought processes, decision making, and organisation in relation to the learning process. These understandings are often enhanced by feedback from peers, mentors, and teachers as coagents, and are critical in the development of metacognition and self-regulation. These skills build upon the capabilities, strategies, and insights developed in Stage 1 Exploring Identities and Futures

Assessment

Stage 2 subjects have a school assessment component and an external assessment component.

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in Stage 2 Activating Identities and Futures:

School assessment

· Assessment Type 1 Portfolio 35%

· Assessment Type 2 Progress Checks 35% External assessment

· Assessment Type 3 Appraisal 30%

Creative Arts

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Students undertake a specialised study within or across one or more Arts disciplines.

Students actively participate in the development and presentation of Creative Arts products. These may take the form of, for example, musicals, plays, concerts, visual art, craft and design works, digital media, film and video, public arts projects, community performances, presentations and installations, and vocal groups or other ensembles.

  • Creative Arts is not precluded by students studying Visual Art and Visual Art Design in Stage 2.
  • In a nutshell, Creative Arts is about learning what practitioners do in their Arts practice. Then students master those skills to achieve polished creative products.
  • It’s driven by learning the craft of making/creating in a way reflective of current contemporary arts practice.
  • Students can work on collaborative Arts products.
  • The written work is very processed based. Students can be highly creative, conceptual and out the box but they don’t have to achieve the same level of synthesis and highly sophisticated understanding to be in the A band as with Visual Arts.
  • Leads directly to Creative Arts tertiary pathways.

ASSESSMENT

School Based Assessment (70%)

  • Assessment Type 1: Product (50%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Inquiry (20%)

External Assessment (30%)

  • Assessment Type 3: Practical Skills (30%)

Not precluded. For students who want a strong Arts pathway. Need to be good independent learners.

Drama - Performing Arts

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Drama is the art of enriching our understanding of human relationships, from the personal to the global. It engages others through the creation of original connections between presenters, audiences, ideas and narratives. Drama asks us to question – as individuals, societies and as a species – not only how and what we do, but also why we choose to think and do things the way we do. In asking these questions and creating dramatic ways of considering these ideas, Drama students develop their unique gifts as creative, informed, wise, productive and inter-personally skilled artists and collaborators.  This course involves a combination of practical and theory (although most theory can be presented in multi modal forms).

Note: Previous experience in Drama is preferable.

  • Group presentation: study of a dramatic innovator and practical application of knowledge via performance in roles such as actor, director, designer. 20%
  • Folio: review live theatre performances and group production report in which, students review and analyse their own involvement in a dramatic performance or presentation. 30%
  • Performance:(external assessment) students participate in a group production either as a performer or in an off stage design role (lighting design, sound design, set design, costume design, make – up design etc). This task requires some out of hours’ rehearsal commitment. 30%
  • Interpretative study: investigate and respond to a dramatic innovator such as Tim Burton or Baz Luhmann etc 20%

Music - Music Explorations

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Students develop their critical and creative thinking, and their aesthetic appreciation of music, through exploring and responding to the music of others, and refining and presenting performances and/or compositions. These performances and/or compositions may include original works and/or presentations or arrangements of existing compositions.

Students experiment with, explore, and manipulate musical elements to learn the art of constructing and deconstructing music. They develop and extend their musical literacy and skills through understanding the structural and stylistic features and conventions of music, expressing their musical ideas, and reflecting on and critiquing their learning in music.

ASSESSMENT

  • three musical literacy tasks
  • one portfolio of explorations
  • one creative connections task.

Advice to students: It is highly advisable that students have completed music in Year 11 and that students have their own instrument so they can practice at home. Instrumental lessons are provided to all music students for a variety of instruments free of charge. These lessons will take place within school hours and are required to support students with the practical component of the course. If a student is already receiving lessons privately, school based instrumental lessons are not necessary.

Visual Arts - Art

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

ASSUMED KNOWLEDGE: It is highly recommended that students have had prior experience in one or more Visual Art/ Design subjects.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students work as Artists, demonstrating their learning through individually chosen learning projects in any genre of Visual Art.

 LEARNING  REQUIREMENTS: In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. conceive, develop, and make work(s) of art or design that reflect individuality and the development and communication of a personal visual aesthetic
  2. demonstrate visual thinking through the development and evaluation of ideas and explorations in technical skills with media, materials, and technologies
  3. apply technical skills in using media, materials, technologies, and processes to solve problems and resolve work(s) of art or design
  4. communicate knowledge and understanding of their own works and the connections between their own and other practitioners’ works of art or design
  5. analyse, interpret, and respond to visual arts in cultural, social, and/or historical contexts
  6. develop inquiry skills to explore visual arts issues, ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and questions.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at stage 2 is both school-based and external. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School based Assessment

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio 30%- a Folio documenting visual learning in support of two resolved final artworks.
  • Assessment Type 2: Practical 40%- two resolved Artworks along with two Practitioner’s Statements.

External Assessment                                             

  • Assessment Type 3: Visual Study 30%- an exploration of, and/or experimentation with, one or more styles, ideas, concepts, media, materials, methods, techniques, technologies, or processes.

Students base their exploration and/or experimentation on critical analysis of the work of other practitioners, individual research, and the development of visual thinking and/or technical skills.

They present the findings of their visual study as well as their conclusions, insights, and personal opinions about aesthetics.

Visual Arts - Design

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

ASSUMED KNOWLEDGE: It is highly recommended that students have had prior experience in one or more Design/ Visual Art subjects.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students work as Designers, demonstrating their learning through individually chosen learning projects from Design areas such as Graphic and Communication design, Product design and Environmental design.

 LEARNING  REQUIREMENTS: In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. conceive, develop, and make work(s) of art or design that reflect individuality and the development and communication of a personal visual aesthetic
  2. demonstrate visual thinking through the development and evaluation of ideas and explorations in technical skills with media, materials, and technologies
  3. apply technical skills in using media, materials, technologies, and processes to solve problems and resolve work(s) of art or design
  4. communicate knowledge and understanding of their own works and the connections between their own and other practitioners’ works of art or design
  5. analyse, interpret, and respond to visual arts in cultural, social, and/or historical contexts
  6. develop inquiry skills to explore visual arts issues, ideas, concepts, processes, techniques, and questions.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at stage 2 is both school-based and external. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School Based Assessment

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio 30%- a Folio documenting visual learning in support of two resolved final design works.
  • Assessment Type 2: Practical 40%- two resolved Design Works along with two Practitioner’s Statements.

External Assessment                                            

  • Assessment Type 3: Visual Study 30%- an exploration of, and/or experimentation with, one or more styles, ideas, concepts, media, materials, methods, techniques, technologies, or processes.

Students base their exploration and/or experimentation on critical analysis of the work of other practitioners, individual research, and the development of visual thinking and/or technical skills.

They present the findings of their visual study as well as their conclusions, insights, and personal opinions about aesthetics.

Food and Hospitality

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In the first semester this subject develops skills in selecting, planning and preparing food for catering events. Students gain an understanding of the processes used in a catering enterprise. The nature and scope of the Food and Hospitality Industry is explored, as is legislation and other factors that impact on the industry. In the second semester students develop an understanding of the processes used in a catering enterprise. Students examine the decision-making, interpersonal, management and group skills desired in the Food and Hospitality Industry. Students are involved in several catering functions. Assessment is based on assignments involving both theoretical and practical components.

ASSESSMENT

School based Assessment:

  • Practical activities (5)                                 50%
  • Group activities (1)                                     20%

External Assessment:

  • Independent Investigation                       30%

For more information, please click link below:

Material Solutions

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

This course is centred around the use of advanced manufacturing concepts, techniques and equipment.

Students will have access to a range of traditional and computer controlled machines, hand held power tools and equipment, 3D printers and a laser cutter to design and produce products. Utilising a broad range of materials students will use machines and manufacturing methods that reflect modern manufacturing processes in contemporary industries.

CONTENT

The course will develop skills in design, problem solving and teamwork with practical work including some traditional timber skilling and projects incorporating the use of contemporary and advanced manufacturing technologies and techniques.

ASSESSMENT

Practical skills in use of machines form a major component of the assessment.

  • Skills and Applications Tasks 20%
  • Product 50%
  • Folio (external assessment) 30%

English

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In English students analyse the interrelationship of author, text and audience with an emphasis on how language and stylistic features shape ideas and perspectives in arrange of contexts. they consider social, cultural, economic, historical and/or political perspectives in texts and their representation of human experience and the world.

Students explore how the purpose of a text is achieved through application of text conventions and stylistic choices to position the reader to respond to ideas and perspectives. Students then create their own imaginative, interpretive, analytical and persuasive texts that may be written, oral and/or multimodal.

This course is designed to be a traditional English course with a significant amount of flexibility in text choice and assignment direction. Students who want a balance of text analysis and text creation should choose this subject.

Students who did Essential English in Stage 1 should not choose this subject and should instead look at Stage 2 Essential English if they wish to study English in year 12.

Note: Only one of the English offerings may be attempted as a standard Stage 2 load.

School Assessment 70%

  • Assessment type 1: Responding to text 30%
  • Assessment type 2: Creating texts and Writer’s Statement 40%

External Assessment

  • Assessment type 3: Comparative Analysis 30%

Essential English

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Essential English is a 20-credit subject at Stage 2. In Essential English students respond to and create texts in and for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and/or workplace contexts.

Students understand and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.

The focus of Essential English is on the practical application of the English language and how language can be explored in real life contexts.
Students who completed Essential English in Stage 1 may choose this subject if they wish to continue with English in Stage 2. However, Students who did English in Stage 1 may also choose this subject as an option.
Note: Only one of the English offerings may be attempted as a standard Stage 2 load.

School assessment (70%)
• Assessment Type 1: Responding to Texts (30%)
• Assessment Type 2: Creating Texts (40%)

External assessment (30%)
• Assessment Type 3: Language Study (30%)

Students provide evidence of their learning through seven assessments, including the external assessment component. Students complete:
• three assessments for responding to texts
• three assessments for creating texts
• one language study.

Child Studies

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Within this course there are opportunities to develop a range of employability skills related to the care and development of children and it is highly linked to careers in Early Childhood.

The course focuses on children and their development from conception to 8 years of age and incorporates practical and theoretical activities, working individually and in groups. Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of young children through individual, collaborative, and practical learning.

They explore concepts such as the development, needs, and rights of children, the value of play, concepts of childhood and families, and the roles of parents and care-givers. Students have opportunities to build their understanding of the range of attitudes, values, and beliefs of people in the wider community in relation to children and child-rearing practices. They also consider the importance of behaviour management, child nutrition, and the health and well-being of children.

There are five areas of study in Stage 2 Child Studies, as listed below:

  • Contemporary and Future Issues
  • Economic and Environmental Influences
  • Political and Legal Influences
  • Sociocultural Influences
  • Technological Influences

For a 20-credit subject, students provide evidence of their learning through seven assessments, including the external assessment component. Students undertake:

  • four practical activities (50%)
  • two group activities (20%)
  • one investigation (30%)

For more information, please click link below:

Health and Wellbeing

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Having good health and wellbeing is crucial to quality of life and is a fundamental human right. Even though it is one of the most talked about topics, and is currently trending worldwide, our Health is too often not treated as a priority. Students develop the knowledge, skills and understandings required to explore and understand influences and make decisions regarding health and wellbeing. They consider the role of health and wellbeing in different contexts and explore ways of promoting positive outcomes for individuals, communities and global society.

There are many areas of interest that Health and Wellbeing explores, and possible career pathways from this course could lead to health services, research, psychology, teaching or sport science.

Students learn strategies to improve their own mental/physical/emotional wellbeing and the community around them. Health and Wellbeing is a 20-credit subject at Stage 2 that consists of the following concepts:

  • Health literacy
  • Health determinants
  • Social equity
  • Health promotion

For a 20-credit subject, students complete five assessments the external assessment component. Students undertake:

  • Two Initiative Tasks (40%)
  • Two Folio Tasks (30%)
  • One Inquiry (30%)

For more information, please click link below:

OUTDOOR EDUCATION

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

The study of Outdoor Education provides students with opportunities to experience personal growth and to develop social skills, self-confidence, initiative, self-reliance, leadership, and collaborative skills. The development of their relationship with natural environments impacts positively on students’ health and wellbeing and fosters a lifelong connection with nature and a commitment to responsible activity in natural environments. In this subject, students will be supported to develop skills in planning and implementing outdoor journeys, demonstrate initiative, self-reliance, leadership, and a sense of responsibility towards others, investigate, critically analyse, and reflect on strategies that achieve sustainable use of natural environments (Aboriginal perspectives) and reflect on the personal, social and environmental outcomes of participation in an outdoor journey.

Students study Outdoor Education topics through three interrelated Focus Areas:

  • Focus Area 1 – Environment and conservation
  • Focus Area 2 – Planning and management
  • Focus Area 3 – Personal and social growth and development

Students are assessed using the SACE Performance Standards. Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

  • Assessment Type 1: About Natural Environments
  • Assessment Type 2: Experiences in Natural Environments
  • Assessment Type 3: Connections with Natural Environments

Please note, an additional fee of $300.00 (GST free) per student is required for participation in this course, which includes all students’ camp fees and excursions.

For more information, please click link below:

Physical Education

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Through Physical Education, students explore the participation in and performance of human physical activities. It is an experiential subject in which students explore their physical capacities and investigate the factors that influence and improve participation and performance outcomes, which lead to greater movement confidence and competence. An integrated approach to learning in Physical Education supports an Arnoldian1 educational framework that promotes deep learning ‘in, through and about’ physical activity. Physical activities can include sports, theme-based games, fitness and recreational activities. Classes can undertake a learning and assessment program using a single focus approach (e.g. single sport) or can undertake multiple sports, games and/or activities. Topics that are undertaken include:

Focus Area 1: In movement

  • Application of Energy Sources affecting physical performance
  • Application of the effects of training on physical performance
  • How does biomechanics affect physical activity and movement?
  • Practical application of learning theories
  • Psychology of sporting performance
  • Movement concepts and performance

Focus Area 2: Through movement

  • Social psychology
  • Psychology of sporting performance
  • Barriers and enablers to physical activity
  • Social strategies to manipulate equity in participation
  • Personal influences.

Focus Area 3: About movement

  • Energy Sources affecting human performance
  • Physiological factors affecting performance
  • The effects of training on physical performance
  • Technological developments in biomechanics
  • The learning process
  • The learning journey

Students are assessed using the SACE assessment criteria based on the learning requirements and performance standards describing their level of achievement. Students are assessed on the following:

Assessment Type 1: Diagnostics (30%)

Assessment Type 2: Self-Improvement Portfolio (40%)

Assessment Type 3: Group Dynamics Task (30%) external For more information, please click link below:

Legal Studies

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

A study of four topics provides an exploration of the Australian legal system from the local level to its global connections. Students examine the key concepts of parliamentary democracy, constitutional government, and participation. Central to this understanding is the concept that law-making and dispute resolution are social forces that can affect individuals or groups; generate social, economic, or technological change; and cause conflict or inequity within society.
Whilst it is not necessary to complete Legal Studies in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

Topics cover four broad groups:

  • The Australian Legal System
  • Constitutional Government
  • Law-making
  • Justice Systems

ASSESSMENT
School Based Assessment

  • Folio 50%
  • Inquiry 20%

External Assessment

  • Exam 30%

Society and Culture

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In Society & Culture, students gain insight into the significance of factors such as gender, ethnicity, racism, class, and power. Students will learn to critically analyse different viewpoints about people, societies, and issues, and gain a better understanding of the diversity within and across societies.

Students learn about the ways in which societies constantly change and are affected by social, political, historical, environmental, economic, and cultural factors.

Students develop the skills and experience to understand how individual and group involvement can influence change, and to consider the consequences of a range of possible social actions. They learn to challenge their own thinking and develop skills in presenting opinions supported by evidence.

Topics cover three broad groups:
• Culture e.g. The Material World
• Contemporary Challenges e.g. People & the Environment
• Global Issues e.g. A question of rights.

Although completing Society & Culture in Stage 1 is not required for taking this subject in Stage 2, it is beneficial. Most Stage 1 Humanities subjects will provide a solid skill foundation for this subject.

ASSESSMENT

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in
Stage 2 Society & Culture:

School-based assessment

  • Folio 50%
  • Interaction 20%

External Assessment

  • Investigation 30%

Womens Studies

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Women’s Studies will interest and inspire both female and male students. It offers students an opportunity to explore the construction of gender, of femininity and masculinity within different cultures and to consider how this affects the position of women within society. The approach adopted in Women’s Studies is interdisciplinary so students can explore areas as diverse as History, Media and Film, Literature, Religion, Legal Studies, Politics, Art and Health.

Students use their understanding of gender identity (femininity/masculinity), gender relations (gender stereotypes, public/private distinction), and identity as difference (identity politics) to work through four to six of the following key issues:

  • Issue 1: Representations of Women in Cultural Texts
  • Issue 2: Women and Work
  • Issue 3: Family Life and Caring
  • Issue 4: Health and Well-being
  • Issue 5: Women and the Law
  • Issue 6: Women’s Struggles, Achievements, and Empowerment
  • Issue 7: Women, Culture, and Society
  • Issue 8: Lifestyle and Choice
  • Issue 9: Communication and Technology
  • Issue 10: Development and Globalisation
  • Issue 11: Negotiated Issue.

Whilst it is not necessary to complete Gender Studies in Stage 1 to do this subject in Stage 2 it is advantageous. Note: that most of the humanities subjects in Stage 1 will give you a reasonable skill foundation to do this subject.

 ASSESSMENT

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in
Stage 2 Women’s Studies:

School Based Assessment (70%)

  • Assessment Type 1: Text Analysis (20% – 1-2 tasks)
  • Assessment Type 2: Essay (20% – 1 task)
  • Assessment Type 3: Folio (30% – 3 tasks)

External Assessment (30%)

  • Assessment Type 4: Issues Analysis (30% – 1 task)

Indonesian

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

This course is available to students who have passed and completed 20 credits of stage 1 Indonesian.

CONTENT

Stage 2 Indonesian continues the study of the following three themes each with a number of topics and sub-topics:

  • The individual (eg sport and recreation, personal world)
  • The Indonesian-speaking Communities (eg visiting Indonesia, religion, gender)
  • The changing world (eg environment, youth issues)

Through these themes, course work and an in-depth study, the students develop a deeper understanding and confidence in their knowledge and expression of Indonesian.

ASSESSMENT

There are 3 major components:

  • Exam 30%
  • Folio 50%
  • In-depth Study 20%

The folio mark is based on 3-5 main assessment tasks

Mathematics - General Mathematics

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In Stage 2 General Mathematics, students continue to develop and extend their understanding of mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem solving. A problem-based approach is integral to the development of mathematical models and the associated key concepts in the topics. Topics cover a diverse range of applications of mathematics, including personal financial management, the statistical investigation process, modelling using linear and non-linear functions, and discrete modelling using networks and matrices. Successful completion of General Mathematics at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses requiring a non-specialised background in mathematics and for careers in the more technical trades.

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

20 credits of Stage 1 General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods at a C grade or better. A solid understanding of Stage 1 General Mathematics content is vital.

CONTENT

Stage 2 Physics is a 20-credit subject. The topics for Stage 2 Physics are:

  • Modelling With Linear Relationships
  • Modelling With Matrices
  • Statistical Models
  • Financial Models
  • Discrete Models

Students study all five topics. The topics can be sequenced and structured to suit individual groups of students.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment at Stage 2 is school based, but moderated by the SACE Board.

Students undertake two mathematical investigations and five skills and applications tasks.

Students undertake an online examination to assess mathematical understanding from Topics 3, 4 and 5. The examination requires students to demonstrate knowledge, routine skills and applications, analysis and interpretation. Students provide explanations and arguments, and use correct mathematical notation, terminology, and representations throughout the examination.

The weightings for the 8 assessment tasks is:

  • Investigations Folio (mathematical investigations) 30%
  • Skill and Applications Tasks 40%
  • External Examination 30%

FUTURE PATHWAYS

Successful completion of General Mathematics at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses requiring a non-specialised background in mathematics or a prerequisite for enrolment.

Careers linked with this course include accounting, architecture, commerce, economics, nursing, science, agricultural science, agri-business, business management, aviation, construction management, information technology, building trades, building design, amongst many others.

Mathematics - Mathematical Methods

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In Stage 2 Mathematical Methods, students continue to develop and extend their understanding of mathematical skills and techniques that enable them to explore, describe, and explain aspects of the world around them in a mathematical way. It places mathematics in relevant contexts and deals with relevant phenomena from the students’ common experiences, as well as from scientific, professional, and social contexts. Students develop sophisticated understanding of calculus and statistics. By using functions and their derivatives and integrals, and by mathematically modelling physical processes, students develop a deep understanding of the physical world through a sound knowledge of relationships involving rates of change. Students use statistics to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation.

A Graphics Calculator (ideally CASIO fx-CG50 AU) is required. These are available for purchase from a local retailer, or a lesser but compatible model can be loaned through the school.

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND

20 credits of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods at a C grade or better. A solid understanding of Stage 1 Mathematical Methods content is vital.

CONTENT

Stage 2 Mathematical Methods is a 20-credit subject. The topics at Stage 2 are:

  • Topic 1: Further Differentiation and Applications
  • Topic 2: Discrete Random Variables
  • Topic 3: Integral Calculus
  • Topic 4: Logarithmic Functions
  • Topic 5: Continuous Random Variables
  • Topic 6: Sampling and Confidence Intervals

Students study all six topics. The topics can be sequenced and structured to suit individual groups of students.

ASSESSMENT

Most assessment at Stage 2 is school based, but moderated by the SACE Board. The external exam is assessed externally.

Students complete one mathematical investigation and six skills and applications tasks.

Students undertake an online examination to assess mathematical understanding from all Stage 2 Mathematical Methods topics studied. The examination requires students to demonstrate knowledge, routine skills and applications, analysis and interpretation. Students provide explanations and arguments, and use correct mathematical notation, terminology, and representations throughout the examination.

The weightings for the 8 assessment tasks is:

  • Investigations Folio (mathematical investigation) 20%
  • Skill and Applications Tasks 50%
  • External Examination 30%

FUTURE PATHWAYS

Successful completion of Mathematical Methods at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses requiring a specialised background in mathematics or a prerequisite for enrolment.

Mathematical Methods provides the foundation for further study in mathematics, economics, computer sciences, and the sciences. It prepares students for courses and careers that may involve the use of statistics, such as health or social sciences.

When studied together with Specialist Mathematics, this subject can be a pathway to engineering, physical science, and laser physics

Mathematics - Specialist Mathematics

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In Specialist Mathematics, students continue to develop and extend their mathematical knowledge, skills, and understanding, and are provided opportunities to use rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs and using mathematical models. It includes the study of functions and calculus.

A student studying Specialist Mathematics must also study Mathematical Methods.

A Graphics Calculator (ideally CASIO fx-CG50 AU) is required. These are available for purchase from a local retailer, or a lesser but compatible model can be loaned through the school.

Recommended background

20 credits of Stage 1 Specialist Mathematics and Mathematical Methods at a C grade or better. A solid understanding of Stage 1 Specialist Mathematics and Mathematical Methods content is vital.

Content

The following topics provide the framework for learning in Stage 2 Mathematical Specialist:

  • Mathematical Induction
  • Complex Numbers
  • Functions and Sketching Graphs
  • Vectors In Three Dimensions
  • Integration Techniques and Applications
  • Rates Of Change and Differential Equations

Assessment

Most assessment at Stage 2 is school based, but moderated by the SACE Board. The external exam is assessed externally.

Students complete one mathematical investigation and six skills and applications tasks.

Students undertake an online examination to assess mathematical understanding from all Stage 2 Specialist Mathematics topics studied. The examination requires students to demonstrate knowledge, routine skills and applications, analysis and interpretation. Students provide explanations and arguments, and use correct mathematical notation, terminology, and representations throughout the examination.

The weightings for the 8 assessment tasks is:

  • Investigations Folio (mathematical investigation) 20%
  • Skill and Applications Tasks 50%
  • External Examination 30%

Future pathways

Successful completion of Specialist Mathematics at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses where specialised mathematical knowledge is assumed or a prerequisite for enrolment.

Specialist Mathematics can be a pathway to mathematical sciences, engineering, and physical sciences.

Students envisaging careers in related fields will benefit from studying this subject.

Biology

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

In Stage 2 Biology, students continue to develop and extend their understanding of the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments.

Recommended background

20 credits of Stage 1 Biology at a C grade or better. A solid understanding of Stage 1 Biology content is required.

Content

Stage 2 Biology is a 20-credit subject. The topics at Stage 2 are:

  • Topic 1: DNA and Proteins
  • Topic 2: Cells As The Basis Of Life
  • Topic 3: Homeostasis
  • Topic 4: Evolution

Students study all four topics. The topics will be sequenced and structured to suit individual groups of students.

Assessment

Most assessment at Stage 2 is school based, but moderated by the SACE Board. The external exam is assessed externally.(30% of grade).

Students undertake two practical investigations and one investigation with a focus on science as a human endeavour. They complete four skills and applications tasks.

Students undertake an online examination to assess inquiry skills and science understanding from all Stage 2 Biology topics studied. The examination requires students to demonstrate understanding of science as a human endeavour and apply science understanding from all four topics.

The weightings for the 8 assessment tasks is:

  • Examination (30%)
  • Investigations Folio (30%)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (40%)

Future pathways

Successful completion of Biology at Stage 2 prepares students for entry to tertiary courses where biological content knowledge is assumed or a prerequisite for enrolment.

Careers linked with this course include medical research, veterinary science, food and marine sciences, agriculture, biotechnology, environmental rehabilitation, biosecurity, quarantine, conservation, and ecotourism.

Chemistry

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Chemistry

A good understanding of stage 1 chemistry is assumed knowledge for this course.

 CONTENT

  • Monitoring the Environment
  • Managing Chemical Processes
  • Organic and Biological Chemistry
  • Managing Resources

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Chemistry consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

  • Examination 30%
  • Investigations Folio 30%
  • Skills and Applications Tasks 40%

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include medical or pharmaceutical research, pharmacy, chemical engineering, food science and technologies materials innovation and scientific research.

Naval Engineering (Advanced) Integrated Learning

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Although desirable, it is not necessary to have undertaken Stage 1 Naval Engineering to enrol in Advanced Stage 2 Naval Engineering. This full year hands-on STEM course – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – is suitable for students who are interested in Applied Science, Engineering and Technology. In this course, Applied Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics are used to explore and explain current scientific issues in primarily a Maritime environment. Students become aware of the significance of Mathematics and Science to address a range of Engineering challenges. The Science and Mathematics studied also relate to many vocational pathways.

N.B: This subject has an externally assessed component (Personal Endeavour) and therefore can be used towards an ATAR. Worthy of note is the fact that if students do their work properly, it is very easy to get a very high ATAR score in this subject, which could significantly boost their overall ATAR score.

This course centres on personal and group research activities as well as practical exercises of design and construction of models to test theories, by using Mathematics, Science and the latest CNC Laser cutting technology.

CONTENT ( 20 SACE credits )

  • Relationship between shape and function of hulls
  • Scale Calculations of the volumes of hulls. Simpson’s Method. Displacement and Displacement curves
  • Archimedes Principle applied to ship and floating structures
  • Study of Stability and Stability curves
  • Study of traditional and modern building materials and their applications in engineering designs
  • The STEM of RAS (Replenishment at Sea) and ballistics applied to the flight trajectory of projectiles in the Earth’s gravitational field.
  • STEM and Cultural Study of Woomeras and Spears ( Spear Throwers are called Midla in Kaurna )
  • Mathematics and Science of Optics. SNELL’s law: Effect on the path of Electromagnetic and Oceanic Waves
  • Elements of Electronics: Speed regulator for electric motors, Remote control technology and control systems
  • Current Applications of Electromagnetic spectrum and radio waves. Applications in Radar, GPS and Navigation Technologies
  • Sea vessels future developments – Sea exploration

Engineering Activities: The exploration of Engineering Principles is used in conjunction with Mathematics, Physics and Science to test a remote-controlled working ship model. Students will also have the opportunity, time permitting, to build from A to Z, a full-scale wooden Sailing and Rowing Dingy and test it in a safe location. In the process, they will study the Physics, Science and Engineering Principles relating to Forces, Buoyancy, Displacement, Stability, Aerodynamics, Science of Materials, and Navigation.

Excursions may include if available, visits to the Osborne Shipyards to research Design and Engineering specifications relating to ship building techniques and the Engineering Department of Flinders University at Tonsley Park.

Le Fevre High School, as the Maritime School of South Australia is privileged to have Industry links and contacts, which ensure the direct relevance of this Naval Engineering course. This prepares students for industry pathways which include Tafe courses but also Engineering studies at Flinders University and beyond this, the Australian Maritime College Engineering courses (University of Tasmania), which can open doors for students to get a job in the very lucrative Maritime Industry branches in South Australia and indeed the world.

ASSESSMENT

Practicals Inquiries: Scale calculations, Archimedes Principle and Displacement Curves – STEM of projectiles, Replenishment at sea from ship to ship, Physics of Ballistics and Woomera/Midla – Applications of Snell’s law in Optics and in the direction of Ocean waves.

Connections task – Group activity: Students research an aspect of marine technology and present their findings to the rest of the class as a group presentation where they showcase evidence of communication skills needed in Industries.

Personal Endeavour – Research: Students produce an essay about a chosen Maritime topic and are invited to reflect on their learning experience. This is an externally assessed task, yielding an ATAR score.

There is no examination required to successfully complete this full year course.

  • Practical Inquiries 40 %
  • Connections Task – Group Activity 30 %
  • Personal Endeavour (Externally assessed – ATAR) 30 %

Physics

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND: C grade or higher in Stage 1 Physics

The course assumes mathematical abilities commensurate with having done geometry, trigonometry, and mathematical functions in Stage 1. It is also assumed that students have a sound knowledge of both Stage 1 Physics units.

 CONTENT

Areas covered within the Stage 2 course include:

  • Motion and Relativity
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Light and Atoms

ASSESSMENT

Assessment in Stage 2 Physics consists of the following components, weighted as shown:

  • Examination (30%)
  • Investigations Folio (40%)
  • Skills and Applications Tasks (30%)

FUTURE PATHWAYS

This subject can be used for University and TAFE entrance. Careers linked with this course include engineering, renewable energy generation, communications, materials innovation, transport and vehicle safety, medical science, scientific research, and the exploration of the universe.

Community Studies A & B

Duration: 
Semester, Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

At our school students may do Community Studies within the mainstream subject after consultation with the subject teacher. Students do not choose the subject during Course Counselling day. The subject teacher manages the contract or plan.

Students learn in a community context and interact with teachers, peers, and community members. They decide the focus of their community activity/community application activity, which begins from a point of personal interest, skill, or knowledge.

By setting challenging and achievable goals in their community activity/community application activity, students enhance their knowledge and understanding in a guided and supported learning program. They develop their capacity to work independently and to apply their skills and knowledge in practical ways in their community.

As a non Tertiary Admission Subject (non TAS), Stage 2 Community Studies may contribute to SACE completion but cannot be counted towards an ATAR.

Workplace Practices

Duration: 
Full Year
Compulsory: 
No

Workplace Practices at Stage 2 involves the development of knowledge, skills and understanding of the nature, type, and structure of the workplace. Students learn the relationship between work-related issues and practices, the changing nature of work, industrial relations and workplace issues that may be local, national, global, or industry specific. Students can undertake learning in the workplace and reflect on and evaluate their experiences in relation to their capabilities, interests, and aspirations.  The subject may include the undertaking of vocational education and training (VET) as provided under the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF).

CONTENT

Workplace Practices is a 20‑credit subject at Stage 2. The teaching program includes the following areas of study:

Industry and Work Knowledge

  • Topic 1: Work in Australian Society
  • Topic 2: The Changing Nature of Work
  • Topic 3: Industrial Relations
  • Topic 4: Finding Employment
  • Topic 5: Negotiated Topic.

Vocational Learning and/or Vocational Education and Training (VET).

 ASSESSMENT

Students demonstrate evidence of their learning through the following assessment types:

School-based Assessment

  • Folio 25%
  • Performance 25%
  • Reflection 20%

External Assessment                        

  • Investigation 30%

THRIVE • RESPECT • INTEGRITY

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